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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet.
    Andraspråksinlärning och förstaspråksutveckling i en andraspråkskontext2012In: Flerspråkighet – en forskningsöversikt / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Monica Axelsson, Inger Lindberg, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2012, 153-246 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Helen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The British hedgerow in Sweden: Dealing with spatial differences and reader differences related to the author-reader relationship and culture-specific referents aided by a translation-oriented text analysis model2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education: Disciplinary Literacy and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.2011In: Dynamic content and language collaboration in higher education: theory, research, and reflections / [ed] Jacobs, C., Cape Town: Cape Peninsula University of Technology , 2011, 57-65 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    The relationship between teaching language and student learning in Swedish university physics2011In: Language and learning in the international university: From English uniformity to diversity and hybridity / [ed] B. Preisler, I. Klitgård & A. Fabricius, Multilingual Matters, 2011, 3-18 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Uppsala University.
    Fredlund, Tobias
    Uppsala University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    On the Disciplinary Affordances of Semiotic Resources2014In: Book of Abstracts: The First Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics (IACS-2014), September 25-27, 2014, 2014, 54-55 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 70’s Gibson (1979) introduced the concept of affordance. Initially framed around the needs of an organism in its environment, over the years the term has been appropriated and debated at length by a number of researchers in various fields. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when they are perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al. (2001) have claimed that different modes have different specialized affordances. Then, building on this idea, Airey and Linder (2009) suggested that there is a critical constellation of modes that students need to achieve fluency in before they can experience a concept in an appropriate disciplinary manner. Later, Airey (2009) nuanced this claim, shifting the focus from the modes themselves to a critical constellation of semiotic resources, thus acknowledging that different semiotic resources within a mode often have different affordances (e.g. two or more diagrams may form the critical constellation).

    In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical tool for use in education. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the discernment of one individual, it refers to the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by those functions that the resource is expected to fulfil by the disciplinary community. Disciplinary affordances have thus been negotiated and developed within the discipline over time. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or discerned becomes moot. Rather, from an educational perspective the issue is whether the meaning that a semiotic resource affords to an individual matches the disciplinary affordance assigned by the community. The power of the term for educational work is that learning can now be framed as coming to discern the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

    In this paper we will briefly discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

  • 6.
    Alklid, Jonathan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Twitch, a Breath of Fresh Air?: An Analysis of Sexism on Twitch.tv2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of sexism is arguably an important topic in modern society in several aspects of life. With the introduction of the Internet and communication over the Internet, additional potential sources of sexism have emerged. While there appears to have been a significant number of studies regarding sexism in cyberspace, Twitch.tv is a relatively new platform and seems yet to be properly explored. Therefore, while being limited in size, the present study aims to provide an introduction to Twitch.tv by performing a limited investigation of the extent of sexist behaviour and ideas expressed by users on the site, particularly against female streamers. To accomplish this, 30,000 lines of chat messages from six different chatrooms, three belonging to women and the remaining three to men, were examined for sexist behaviour, based on a variety of parameters such as differences in language complexity and instances of sexist remarks. The results suggested that several varieties of sexism existed on Twitch, and was directed at both men and women, where women seemed to be more heavily affected than men. The conclusion of the study is that Twitch does not seem to be a breath of fresh air in cyberspace as it appears to embody numerous sexist ideas. However, the author notes that Twitch could serve as a potentially useful source of data for future gender studies online.

  • 7.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Conceptions of Personal Learning Environments Among EFL Teachers at Upper Secondary Level in Sweden2013In: 20 Years of EUROCALL: Learning from thePast, Looking to the Future. Proceedings of the 2013 EUROCALL Conference, Évora, Portugal, 2013, 7-13 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, virtual learning environments (VLEs) or course management systems (CMSs) have become commonplace in European higher education as well as making inroads into primary and secondary schools. VLEs such as Moodle, Blackboard and It's Learning offer educational institutions standardized packages in the form of a range of administrative, pedagogical and communicative tools. Teachers of English as a foreign language at secondary and tertiary levels are certainly no exceptions to this trend, employing VLEs as learning platforms to support a variety of ITC-based learning activities and tasks. VLEs have however attracted criticism from some quarters in that they may be seen merely as virtual embodiments of the classroom with all the restrictions which the 'physical' classroom has traditionally entailed (Weller 2007). Furthermore it has been argued that VLEs have failed to embrace the full advantages of Web 2.0 technologies or acknowledge trends towards informal learning afforded by social media etc. The response to this criticism has been the envisioning of Personal Learning Environments or PLEs which utilise the plethora of free, often collaborative online resources and tools now available to learners. This paper explores the conceptualisation of PLEs and their advantages / disadvantages vis-à-vis VLEs among upper secondary school teachers of English in Sweden on the basis of pedagogical principles put forward as part of the Open University's SocialLearn and OpenLearn matrices (Conole 2008). It is suggested that the mapping of the core frameworks of thinking and reflection, experience and activity, conversation and interaction and evidence and demonstration to a set of learning principles can provide the basis for the evaluation of PLEs as envisioned by teachers and learners.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Att läsa och förstå: En studie av förstaspråks- och andraspråkselevers resultat på nationella provets läsförståelse för årskurs 92011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den här undersökningen är att unersöka och analysera förstaspråks- och andraspråkselevers resultat på nationella provets läsförståelsedel i svenska och svenska som andraspråk för att se om det finns några skillnader och/eller likheter i deras läsförståelse och om de i så fall kan kopplas till forskningen om genrekunskapens och ordförrådets betydelse för läsförståelsen.

        I min undersökning använder jag mig av tjugo elevers läsförståelseprov från nationella provet 2010. Jag har rättat proven och analyserat både elevernas svar samt texterna och de tillhörande frågorna utifrån en analysmodell där jag undersöker och analyserar de genrer och ord som används.

        Andraspråkseleverna klarar av provet sämre än vad förstaspråkseleverna gör men man ser tydliga skillnader beroende på vilka genrer det gäller och även förstaspråkseleverna visar att de har problem med de mer abstrakta och kognitivt krävande uppgifterna. Min undersökning har visat att både genrekunskap, ordkunskap och kännedom om innehållet i en text är viktigt för hur bra man lyckas med läsförståelsen.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Jens
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Metaphor in writing: A study on metaphor usage in the online sports sections of two British newspapers2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to investigate the use of metaphors in the sports section of two British newspapers; a broadsheet, The Telegraph, and a tabloid, The Mirror, and locate whether there are any differences between them in terms of metaphor usage. To accomplish this, a total number of twenty sports articles written by four different journalists – two from each newspaper – were analyzed for both conventional and novel metaphors. In order to properly locate and identify metaphors, a method known as MIP (Metaphor Identification Procedure) was used in coordination with the Macmillan Online Dictionary as well as the Oxford English Dictionary in order to deduce the conventionality of the investigated metaphors. The yielded results then showed that both newspapers were very similar in their use of both conventional and novel metaphors, with The Telegraph journalists being slightly more inclined to use novel metaphorical expressions than their colleagues from The Mirror.

  • 10.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Gordon, Moragh
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Fairman, Tony
    An Electronic Corpus of Letters of Artisans and the Labouring Poor (England, c. 1750‐1835): Compilation Principles and Coding Conventions2014In: Recent Advances in Corpus Linguistics: Developing and Exploiting Corpora / [ed] Lieven Vandelanotte, Kristin Davidse, Caroline Gentens, Ditte Kimps, Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2014, 9-29 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Beganovic, Armin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Justifying Operation Iraqi Freedom - A Study of Moral Metaphors in Political Statements2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the way George W. Bush used moral metaphors to intensify the language in his statements on Operation Iraqi Freedom. Three moral metaphors are presented within two different models that are applied on the data.

    The collected material for the metaphors is constituted of cognitive linguistic books from prominent linguists, such as George Lakoff, Alan Cruse and William Croft, and the data is collected from the official White House website. The scientific method used in this study has been qualitative text analysis where the hermeneutic approach has been an essential part of it.

    The main question: In what way did George W. Bush use moral metaphors in his statements to justify Operation Iraqi Freedom?, resulted in use of moral metaphors that sermons people’s moral values, depict Saddam Hussein’s characteristics as immoral, activate people’s moral priorities to help the Iraqi people, and addresses both conservatives and liberals in America.

    The conclusion of my study is that President Bush deliberately intensified the language in his statements through moral metaphors to justify Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Keywords: Cognitive Linguistics, Metaphor, Figurative Language, Operation Iraqi Freedom, War on Terror, George W. Bush, Saddam Hussein, USA, Iraq, Qualitative Text Analysis, Hermeneutics.

  • 12.
    Bengtsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Gender equality in the subject of English in Swedish schools2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The National Agency for Education (Skolverket) and The Swedish National Curriculum have stated that equality between female and male students is important. The present study investigates students in the subject English in Swedish upper secondary school and municipal school for adult education from the perspective of gender dominance in English conversation with a teacher present, with the focus on turn-taking. Two separate observations were made in three classes in adult education and two classes in upper secondary school. The research questions of this investigation are; which gender dominates the on-going conversation in English with a teacher present, how the turns were allocated, given or taken, and if the gender patterns differ between a municipal school for adults and an upper secondary school. The potential impact of the teacher’s sex on the patterns of domination is also taken into consideration. Female dominance as well as male dominance is revealed in the result of the investigated classes’ gender patterns. The results also reveal that the teacher’s sex could have an impact on the patterns of domination.

  • 13.
    Bentzen, Kristine
    et al.
    University of Tromsø, Norway.
    Anderssen, Merete
    University of Tromsø, Norway.
    Waldmann, Christian
    Umeå University.
    Object shift in spoken Mainland Scandinavian2013In: 25th Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics : Reykjavík, May 13-15, 2013: Workshop 5 : Information Structure in Scandinavian Language, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Object Shift (OS) has been studied extensively across the Scandinavian languages (Holmberg 1986, 1999, Vikner 2006). Traditionally, OS is assumed to apply to all weak pronominal objects in Danish, Norwegian and Swedish. However, based on written corpora, Andréasson (2008, 2009, 2010) shows that while OS is obligatory with weak pronominal objects in Danish, these elements may marginally remain in situ in Swedish (cf. also Josefsson 2010 for similar Swedish results based on grammaticality judgments). In an elicited production study, Anderssen et al. (2012) find that Norwegian speakers consistently shift such objects, (1). Moreover, Andréasson also shows that not all weak pronominal objects behave the same way. While pronouns with nominal referents typically undergo OS, weak pronoun det ‘it’ referring to a clause or VP may remain in situ in Swedish. In contrast, in Danish also this latter type usually shifts. Anderssen & Bentzen (2012) argue that det with non-individuated (clausal/VP/type DP) referents generally remains in situ in Norwegian, (2).

    In this study, we investigate OS in spontaneous speech of adults in large Danish, Norwegian and Swedish child language corpora (Plunkett 1985, 1986; Simonsen 1990, Anderssen 2006; and Plunkett & Strömqvist 1992, Strömqvist et al. 1993, respectively).

    Our corpus data display both similarities and differences with the patterns reported above. Concerning non-contrastive weak pronominal objects with a nominal referent, our data show a similar pattern to that of previous studies. In Danish and Norwegian, these objects occur in a shifted position 80-90%, while in Swedish the majority of such objects remain in situ (57%). With respect to det ‘it’ with a non-individuated referent, our spoken data are quite different from those reported in Andréasson. While she found that these elements relatively frequently undergo OS in Swedish, we see a strong tendency for non-individuated det to remain unshifted (found in shifted position less than 3% in both Swedish and Norwegian). Moreover, for Danish, Andréasson reports that non-individuated det practically never remains in situ, while in our Danish data, such elements remain in situ as much as 86% of the time.

    Despite these discrepancies, our investigation confirms the picture regarding OS that has emerged in recent years (Andréasson 2008, 2009, 2010, Mikkelsen 2010, Josefsson 2010, Anderssen & Bentzen 2012), namely that OS is not a uniform phenomenon. There is much variation both depending on type of pronoun (and its referent), and across the Mainland Scandinavian languages. To account for some of the variation, Andréasson links OS to accessibility and cognitive status of the pronominal object. Similarly, Anderssen & Bentzen argue that Norwegian OS is clause-internal topicalization of familiar topical objects with an individuated referent, while this position is generally unavailable to pronouns with a non- individuated referent. Since OS clearly depends on information structure, the discrepancies between our data and those of Andréasson may be due to the different types of corpora studied (spoken vs. written discourse).

    Against this backdrop, we investigate the various factors influencing the position of pronominal objects across spoken Danish, Norwegian and Swedish.

    Examples:

    (1) A: Så    du  husetNEUT?       B: Ja,  jeg likte  detNEUT ikke.

              saw you house.the              yes I     liked it          not

              ‘Did you see the house?’     ‘Yes, I didn’t like it.’

    (2) A: Spiste du  noe  frukt?        B: Nei, jeg gjorde {*detVP} ikke {detVP}.

              ate     you any fruit.MASC        no   I    did          it.NEUT  not    it.NEUT

             ‘Did you eat any fruit?’            ‘No, I didn’t.’              (det = ‘eat any fruit’)

    References

    Anderssen, Merete & Kristine Bentzen. 2012. ‘Norwegian Object Shift as IP-internal topicalization,’ Nordlyd 39.1: The Grammar of Objects, 1-23.

    Anderssen, Merete, Kristine Bentzen & Yulia Rodina. 2012. ‘Topicality and complexity in the acquisition of Norwegian Object Shift,’ Language Acquisition 19.1: 39-72.

    Anderssen, Merete. 2006. The Acquisition of Compositional Definiteness. PhD dissertation, University of Tromsø.

    Andréasson, Maia. 2008. ‘Not all objects are born alike — accessibility as a key to pronominal object shift in Swedish and Danish,’ in Miriam Butt and Tracy Halloway King (eds), Proceedings of the LFG08 Conference, CSLI Publications, Stanford, 26-45.

    Andréasson, Maia. 2009. ‘Pronominal object shift — not just a matter of shifting or not,’ Working Papers in Scandinavian Syntax 84, 1-20.

    Andréasson, Maia. 2010. ‘Object shift or object placement in general,’ in Miriam Butt and Tracy Halloway King (eds), Proceedings of the LFG10 Conference, CSLI Publications, Stanford, 26-42.

    Holmberg, Anders. 1986. Word order and syntactic features in the Scandinavian languages and English. Doctoral dissertation, University of Stockholm.

    Holmberg, Anders. 1999. Remarks on Holmberg’s Generalization,’ Studia Linguistica 53.1: 1- 39.

    Josefsson, Gunlög. 2010. ‘Object Shift and optionality: An intricate interplay between syntax, prosody and information structure,’ Working Papers in Scandinavian Syntax 86, 1-24.

    Mikkelsen, Line. 2011. ‘On prosody and focus in Object Shift,’ Syntax 14.3, 230-264.

    Plunkett, Kim & Sven Strömqvist. 1992. ‘The acquisition of Scandinavian languages,’ in Dan I. Slobin (ed), The crosslinguistic study of language acquisition, Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, 457-556.

    Plunkett, Kim. 1985. Preliminary approaches to language development. Århus: Århus University Press.

    Plunkett, Kim. 1986. Learning strategies in two Danish children’s language development. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 27, 64–73.

    Simonsen, Hanne Gram. 1990. Barns fonologi: system og variasjon hos tre norske og et samoisk barn. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Oslo, Oslo.

    Strömqvist, Sven, Ulla Richthoff & Anders-Börje Andersson. 1993. ‘Strömqvist’s and Richthoff’s corpora: a guide to longitudinal data from four Swedish children,’ Gothenburg Papers in Theoretical Linguistics 66.

    Vikner, Sten. 2006. ‘Object Shift,’ in Martin Everaert and Henk van Riemsdijk (eds.), The Blackwell companion to syntax, Vol III, Blackwell, Oxford, 392-436. 

  • 14.
    Bentzen, Kristine
    et al.
    University of Tromsø, Norway.
    Anderssen, Merete
    University of Tromsø, Norway.
    Waldmann, Christian
    Umeå University.
    Object shift in spoken mainland Scandinavian: a corpus study of Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish2013In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 36, no 2, Special Issue, 115-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent work on Object Shift (OS) suggests that this is not as uniform an operation as traditionally assumed. In this paper, we examine OS in the spontaneous speech of adults in large Danish, Norwegian and Swedish child language corpora in order to explore variation with respect to OS across these three languages. We evaluate our results against three recent strands of accounts of OS, namely a prosodic/phonological account, an account in terms of cognitiv status, and an account in terms of information structure. Our investigation shows that there is both withing-language and across-language variation in the application of OS, and that the three accounts can explain some of our data. However, all accounts are faced with challenges, especially when explaining exceptional cases.

  • 15.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Linnaeus University.
    Divided by a common language: A comparative study of preferences for, and use of, American and British English vocabulary among students in Swedish upper secondary and tertiary education2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative study aims to discover and demonstrate the potential division in preferences for, and use of, AmE and BrE vocabulary by examining the possible influence of variety shift, motivation, gender, and language contact among 181 EFL students in one upper secondary school and one university in Sweden. Accordingly, the material, a questionnaire, was distributed to probe the preferences and potential inclination factors through solicitation of background information and personal attitudes towards English. Additionally, through a selection process within the questionnaire, to determine the division in actual variety use, the respondents chose between 30 variety-dependent synonyms randomly divided into two separate columns. The results demonstrate a self-reported preference for AmE among upper secondary students, which seems to derive from its high frequency of use, and a preference for BrE among students in tertiary education, due to the more appealing sound of pronunciation and the status which it is believed to signal. Additionally, intrinsic motivation is shown to be more frequent among students who prefer BrE. The differences in variety use are, despite some minor connection to variety shift, essentially identical regardless of variety preference, motivation, EFL level and student gender, with AmE being used most frequently. However, none of the respondents used exclusively one variety without alternating between the two in at least one instance, but the extent of inclination seemed to depend on the variety with which one had had the longest contact.

  • 16.
    Bjäremo, Svante
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    The Nordic syllabi and the Common European Framework of Reference: Similarities and differences2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the similarities and differences between the Nordic syllabi (the Finnish, Swedish and Norwegian syllabi) and the influence CEFR has had on their structure and development. This was carried out using the method of hermeneutics, looking for similarities and differences using seven different dimensions of comparison. The study shows that there are similarities between the Nordic syllabi which have all been influenced by the CEFR. The most notable similarity between the documents is the communicative nature of teaching and assessment. This could give a deeper understanding of the Nordic countries' similarities and differences when it comes to language teaching. Further studies are needed using quantitative methods to say if these findings and connections between the Nordic syllabi are due to the influence of the CEFR or if other factors have been just as influential.

  • 17.
    Björk, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Not for Sale: Terminology and cultural references in a text on human trafficking2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to analyse what strategies may be the most suitable ones when dealing with problems in the translation of a text on human trafficking. The focus of the study is how to translate terminology related to human trafficking, but also on how to deal with references to culture-specific phenomena. In order to find possible solutions for translation problems in the text, different dictionaries and term banks were used, as well as parallel texts and different translation strategies.

              The analysis is based on the translation strategies laid down by Vinay and Darbelnet, Ingo and Newmark. The findings of the study show that a number of different translation strategies had to be applied in order to solve the different translation problems. Regarding the translation of terminology, modulation, equivalence, addition and omission were the most useful strategies, as well as using parallel texts. The strategies found most useful in translating culture-specific phenomena were modulation, equivalence and addition, but componential analysis, transference and established translations were also used. Factors that decided what were the most appropriate strategies to apply in the different instances were the aim of the text, the perspective of the target reader and parallel texts.

  • 18.
    Björklund, Markus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    More than words: Different strategies to remedy culturally prompted translation difficulties2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to investigate how different kinds of adaption strategies can work in synergy to overcome culturally prompted translation difficulties. The strategies used were analysed in the translation of a text from a tourist guide containing references to local phenomena. It was found that the different strategies combine when overcoming the translation difficulties, but that not all of them turn out useful. It is suggested that source texts that are bound to a physical location as regards contents are likely to be culturally adaptable intranslation mainly by means of addition, omission and generalization.

  • 19.
    Björknert, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    "Idag måste alla kunna läsa": Tre pedagogers arbetssätt med elever i läs- och skrivsvårigheter2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The aim of the study is to investigate how three pedagogues with different orientations work with reading and writing difficulties in the same school. A qualitative method with interviews and observations of the teachers was applied to investigate the methods used by a special education teacher, a class pedagogue and a special education pedagogue, and the needs for support in the teaching of pupils with reading and writing difficulties. In the design of interview questions and observation protocols and the processing of the collected data, the research method has been deductive, which means that themes based on the aim of the study and previous research were the starting point for the categorization of the data.

    The results of the study show that the group of pupils with reading and writing difficulties is problematic because the needs for support vary greatly and because, according to the pedagogues, the iPad was the device that contained the alternative tools that were able to give the pupils the best support. It is important to have variation in the teaching, and different apps can offer this. The theoretical premise of the study is the socio-cultural perspective which revealed itself in the way that, no matter what difficulty the pupil has, support from the pedagogues is needed to advance in the learning process, and this should take place in social interaction between pedagogue and pupil. 

  • 20.
    Blomberg, Charlotta
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    La presencia de la ansiedad dentro del marco de ELE: Un estudio en el que se profundiza en la ansiedad de los estudiantes y cuáles son los factores que influyen en ella2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this essay is to identify if students experience anxiety in oral contexts during their Spanish classes. The aim is also to investigate what factors affect the potential anxiety, and determine the factor that influences the students to the greatest extent. The present study is an empirical study consisting of questionnaires carried out with 163 students from two different schools, one lower secondary school and one upper secondary school. The students study Spanish as a foreign language in four different course levels, from levels 1 to 4.Anxiety in oral contexts when studying a foreign language is a well known phenomenon within the area of foreign language adquisition. Accordingly, this study aims to, on the one hand, either confirm or disprove the hypothesis that students experience anxiety. On the other hand, the aim is to find out a potential correlation between the students’ self-assessed proficiency levels of Spanish and their reported levels of anxiety. Lastly, the study aims to determine whether the teachers of the questioned students has knowledge of what the students’ answers will be.The results given by the questionnaire show that the vast majority of the students experience anxiety, not only in terms of the course of Spanish in general but also in terms of an oral context. In order to determine if there are any correlations between the variables in question, a series of statistical tests are applied and analysed. The results have shown that there exists a correlation between the students’ self-assessed proficiency levels of Spanish and their reported levels of anxiety. According to the teachers’ answers, the results show that they are, in most cases, not in line with the students’ answers.

  • 21.
    Boberg, Per
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Word by word, phrase by phrase, sentence by sentence: A corpus-based study of the N1 by N1 construction2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper examines the N1 by N1 construction using corpus linguistic methodology.The distribution of types of the construction that occur more than once either unhyphenated or hyphenated in any subcorpus of the British National Corpus accessed through the BrighamYoung University interface is examined. Written and spoken language as well as variousgenres are compared. Hyphenation is also investigated. A collocation analysis of some typesof the construction is further carried out and it is concluded that the N1 by N1 construction canbe part of the on a N1 by N1 basis construction. Results from the quantitative analysis as wellas the qualitative discussion suggest that the N P N construction may be undergoinglexicalisation starting as an adverbial and moving to functioning as a premodifier. Thissuggestion is indicated through complementary diachronic searches in the Oxford EnglishDictionary. It is also indicated that the construction may follow a development pattern similarto that of N1 to N1. The notion of construction is discussed in relation to the N1 by N1 construction, and a hierarchical view of constructions is proposed as a solution to some of theproblems with the term.

  • 22.
    Bokander, Lars
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    SweLT 1.0: konstruktion och pilottestning av ett nytt svenskt frekvensbaserat ordförrådstest2016In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 11, no 1, 39-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett flervalstest av receptivt ordförråd, baserat på information om ordfrekvens, konstruerades och provades ut i en pilotstudie. Orden samplades ur en svensk korpusderiverad basordlista från frekvensnivåerna 2000, 3000, 5000 och 8000 (definierade som frekvensband med 1000 ord vardera). Studiens deltagare utgjordes av 290 personer med svenska som främmande- eller andraspråk. De flesta item fungerade väl och reliabiliteten var god förutom i 2K-nivån, där en tydlig takeffekt gav låg varians i mätdata. I linje med vad tidigare forskning har visat, följde testresultaten ett implikationellt mönster med distinkt progression i svårighet från lägre till högre nivå och detta förhållande kunde iakttas både på grupp- och individnivå. Deltagarnas färdighetsnivå (GERS), enligt lärarbedömning eller kursplacering, visade signifikant korrelation med poängresultat på ordtestet, dock något lägre än väntat. Slutligen föreslås en modell för hur testpoäng kan användas för kvantifiering av receptivt ordförråd.

  • 23.
    Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Gothenburg university, Sweden.
    Ericsson, StinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Sociolingvistik i praktiken2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Djupare insikter i sociolingvistik – studier av hur språk och samhälle hänger samman – nås bäst genom att utföra egna undersökningar, inte genom att enbart läsa om andras studier. I den här boken visar ett antal forskare hur de rent praktiskt gör sociolingvistik, d.v.s. vilka metoder de använder för att samla in och analysera data. Målet är att inspirera läsaren att själv undersöka språkanvändning i det omgivande samhället: vid köksbordet, i sms-konversationer eller ute på skolgården.

    Varje kapitel utgår från en redan publicerad studie och dess metoder beskrivs och förklaras detaljerat. Här får läsaren även förslag på upp­gifter och uppsatsämnen samt lästips. Boken innehåller också en samling förslag på befintliga webbresurser som studenter kan använda i sociolingvistiska undersökningar samt en ordlista över sociolingvistiska termer med förklaringar.

    Sociolingvistik i praktiken kompletterar introduktionsböcker i ämnet och riktar sig till studenter på grundnivå och avancerad nivå i främst språkämnen och lärarutbildning. Boken kan också användas i metodkurser och som handbok i uppsatsarbete.

  • 24.
    Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Gothenburg university, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Stina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Sociolingvistik i praktiken – Inledning2015In: Sociolingvistik i praktiken / [ed] Sally Boyd & Stina Ericsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 11-34 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet.
    Age differences in first language attrition: A maturational constraints perspective2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates age-related differences in first language (L1) attrition in a second language (L2) setting. The thesis is based on four individual studies. The aim of each of the studies has been to examine aspects of age differences that to date have remained in the background of attrition research: Study I gives an overview of research on age differences in L1 attrition and suggests a reinterpretation of age effects in attrition, using as a point of departure critical period constructs. Study I also formulates hypotheses regarding the contour and timing of attrition susceptibility and its interplay with non-biological factors. Study II investigates L1 residual knowledge and L2 ultimate attainment in international adoptees. The results suggest that a) that L1 remnants may be found if relearning activities have taken place prior to testing; b) L2 learners who have experienced a complete cut-off in L1 contact do not attain higher L2 proficiency levels than learners who have stayed in contact with the L1. The results also indicate that the level of L1 reactivation and L2 ultimate attainment are related to age of adoption. Study III examines age effects on the retention of L1 event construal patterns. The results show that the onset of puberty is a turning point for the degree of conformity with native behaviour, i.e. those who arrived in the L2 setting before puberty were more likely to exhibit non-converging patterns than those who arrived after puberty. This finding suggests that in attrition conceptual proficiency is equally affected by age as are formal language skills. Finally, Study IV explores the role of language aptitude in prepubescent attriters. The results show that nativelike grammatical intuitions are connected to language aptitude, and that speakers with high levels of language aptitude rely less on L1 contact than do speakers with low levels of language aptitude in their retention of nativelike grammatical intuitions in the L1.

  • 26.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet.
    Effects of age of L2 acquisition on L1 event conceptualization patterns2009In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 12, no 3, 305-322 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the effects that the age of onset (AO) of second language (L2) acquisition exerts on the attrition of first language (L1) event conceptualization patterns. The subjects studied are L1 Spanish–L2 Swedish bilinguals living in Sweden. The specific research questions addressed in the study concern the role of AO in endpoint encoding and temporal perspectivation in goal-oriented motion events. In view of previous findings on age effects in attrition, it is hypothesized that deviations from Spanish monolingual patterns of conceptualization would be limited basically to subjects whose AO is below 12 years of age. The analyses show that subjects with AO > 12 converge with Spanish monolingual controls on both endpoint encoding and temporal perspectivation strategies, whereas deviations from the controls' performance are found exclusively in subjects with AO < 12. It is suggested, in view of these findings, that subjects with early AO are more dependent on advantageous socio-psychological circumstances such as L1 contact and use in order to fully acquire/maintain Spanish event conceptualization patterns, while L1 maintenance in subjects with late AO is less dependent on these factors. It is concluded that patterns of event conceptualization are affected by age in the same way as formal language skills.

  • 27.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet.
    Language attrition2013In: Language, Society and Communication: an introduction / [ed] Zannie Bock & Gift Mheta, van Schaik , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet ; University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Language-specific patterns in event conceptualization: Insights from bilingualism2011In: Thinking and speaking in two languages / [ed] Aneta Pavlenko, Avon: Multilingual Matters, 2011, 108-142 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet.
    Maturational constraints and first language attrition2009In: Language learning, ISSN 0023-8333, E-ISSN 1467-9922, Vol. 59, no 3, 687-715 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to examine how first language attrition research on maturational constraints interprets and links its findings to current views on maturation in the field of second language acquisition. It is argued that attrition research exhibits certain inconsistencies in the interpretation of the structural characteristics of the critical period and the interplay between maturation and nonmaturational factors in attrition. In view of findings from first language relearning/reactivation and theoretical-methodological advances in second language research on maturation, the article proposes a reinterpretation of maturational constraints in language attrition that, first, emphasizes the gradual decline of susceptibility to attrition and, second, puts forth the conditioning function that the maturational constraints have on nonmaturational factors.

  • 30.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet.
    Review: Language attrition. By Monika S. Schmid. (Key topics in sociolinguistics.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.2012In: Language, ISSN 0097-8507, E-ISSN 1535-0665, Vol. 88, no 4, 923-926 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University.
    Segmentation and temporal structuring of events in early Spanish-Swedish bilinguals2011In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 15, no 1, 56-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine patterns of segmentation and temporal structuring of events in early bilinguals. The participant group consists of 25 L1 Spanish — L2 Swedish adult bilinguals residing in Sweden, with ages of L2 acquisition ranging from 1 to 11 years. There were 15 native speakers of Swedish and 15 native speakers of Spanish engaged as monolingual controls. The participants provided online-retellings in both languages of an excerpt from the film Modern Times. The bilinguals’ L1 and L2 retellings were compared with those of the monolingual speakers of the respective languages. The results indicated that the bilinguals resorted to the same event segmentation strategies in both L1 and L2, opting for an intermediate degree of event resolution. This behavior fell in between the monolingual Spanish high degree of resolution and the monolingual Swedish low degree of resolution. As for temporal structuring patterns, the results showed that the bilinguals in their L2 converged with the Swedish monolingual controls, linking the events by means of anaphoric adverbials (i.e., ‘x then y’). The bilinguals also converged with the Spanish-speaking controls in their L1 perspectivation patterns, as both groups left the temporal relation between the events to be inferred and focused on ongoingness (i.e., now x, now y). These findings are discussed in terms of convergence and co-existence of conceptual patterns (Pavlenko, 1999, 2008).

  • 32.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholms universitet ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Unomathotholo or i-radio? Factors predicting the use of English loanwords among L1 isiXhosa - L2 English bilinguals2014In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 35, no 2, 105-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the use of English loanwords in L1 isiXhosa-L2 English bilinguals living in Cape Town, South Africa. The specific aim of the study is to investigate which individual background factors may increase or reduce the presence of English loanwords in a L1 isiXhosa speaker's repertoire. Data on English loanword use and individual background were collected through a picture naming task and a background questionnaire, respectively. Results showed that those speakers who frequently used English for interactive purposes were more prone to using English loanwords when naming pictures in isiXhosa. Moreover, it was documented that those who arrived at an early age in Cape Town (from the isiXhosa-dominant Eastern Cape Province) were also less prone to using isiXhosa words in the naming task. Marginal, negative effects were found for non-interactive isiXhosa use (i.e. radio, books, etc.) and attitudes towards English, such that those speakers with high indices on these variables used more often English loanwords. A marginal, positive effect of the presence of isiXhosa in primary and secondary school on the use of isiXhosa words was also found.

  • 33.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet ; University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholms universitet.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholms universitet.
    Does first language maintenance hamper nativelikeness in a second language?: a study of ultimate attainment in early bilinguals2012In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 34, no 2, 215-241 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of SLA, the incidence of nativelikeness in second language (L2) speakers has typically been explained as a function of age of acquisition. An alternative interpretation, however, is that L2 learners do not attain nativelike proficiency because of first language (L1) maintenance. This interpretation has nevertheless remained mostly theoretical due to the lack of empirical evidence. This study sets out to address the role of L1 proficiency in L2 ultimate attainment by examining L1 and L2 proficiency in 30 early L1 Spanish-L2 Swedish bilinguals. Language proficiency was assessed through grammaticality judgment tests and cloze tests, and additional data on language aptitude were collected through the Swansea Language Aptitude Test (v. 2.0; Meara, Milton, & Lorenzo-Dus, 2002). The results showed positive correlations between nativelike L1 and L2 behavior. Additionally, it was found that language aptitude was positively correlated with nativelike L1 and L2 performance. In view of these findings, it is suggested that (a) L1 maintenance does not hamper L2 nativelikeness and (b) language aptitude is an important factor for bilingual ultimate attainment.

  • 34.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholms universitet.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholms universitet.
    The role of language aptitude in first language attrition: The case of prepubescent attriters2010In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 31, no 3, 443-464 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While language aptitude has been investigated actively within second language research, there is a current dearth of research on the effects of aptitude in cases of attrition. The aim of the present investigation was to explore the role of language aptitude for L1 proficiency in speakers who experienced a break with their L1 setting prior to puberty. Twenty-five L1 SpanishL2 Swedish bilinguals residing in Sweden participated in the study, and 15 native speakers of Spanish living in Chile were recruited as controls. The L1 proficiency was measured by means of a grammaticality judgement test (GJT) and language aptitude data were obtained through the Swansea Language Aptitude Test (Meara et al. <xref ref-type="bibr" rid="B36">2003</xref>). Results showed a positive correlation between GJT performance and language aptitude. More specifically, the bilinguals with above-average aptitude were more likely to score within the native range on the GJT than those with below-average aptitude. It was also seen that among the participants with below-average aptitude, GJT scores were related to daily L1 use. In view of these findings, we suggest that language aptitude has a compensatory function in language attrition, helping the attriter to retain a high level of L1 proficiency despite reduced L1 contact.

  • 35.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Athanasopoulos, Panos
    University of Reading, UK.
    Language and thought in a multilingual context: The case of isiXhosa2014In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 17, no 2, 431-441 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated within the grammatical aspect approach to motion event cognition, this study takes a first step in investigating language and thought in functional multilinguals by studying L1 isiXhosa speakers living in South Africa. IsiXhosa being a non-aspect language, the study investigates how the knowledge and use of additional languages with grammatical aspect influence cognition of endpoint-oriented motion events among L1 isiXhosa speakers. Results from a triads-matching task show that participants who often used aspect languages and had greater exposure to English in primary education were less prone to rely on endpoints when categorising motion events.

  • 36.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet ; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Athanasopoulos, Panos
    Lancaster University.
    Linguistic relativity in SLA: Towards a new research programme2014In: Language learning, ISSN 0023-8333, E-ISSN 1467-9922, Vol. 64, no 4, 952-985 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current article is to support the investigation of linguistic relativity in second language acquisition and sketch methodological and theoretical prerequisites toward developing the domain into a full research program. We identify and discuss three theoretical-methodological components that we believe are needed to succeed in this enterprise. First, we highlight the importance of using nonverbal methods to study linguistic relativity effects in second language (L2) speakers. The use of nonverbal tasks is necessary in order to avoid the circularity that arises when inferences about nonverbal behavior are made on the basis of verbal evidence alone. Second, we identify and delineate the likely cognitive mechanisms underpinning cognitive restructuring in L2 speakers by introducing the theoretical framework of associative learning. By doing so, we demonstrate that the extent and nature of cognitive restructuring in L2 speakers is essentially a function of variation in individual learners’ trajectories. Third, we offer an in-depth discussion of the factors (e.g., L2 proficiency and L2 use) that characterize those trajectories, anchoring them to the framework of associative learning, and reinterpreting their relative strength in predicting L2 speaker cognition.

  • 37.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet ; University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Athanasopoulos, Panos
    University of Reading, UK.
    Oostendorp, Marcelyn
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Motion event cognition and grammatical aspect: Evidence from Afrikaans2013In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 51, no 5, 929-955 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the relationship between grammatical aspect and motion event construal has posited that speakers of non-aspect languages are more prone to encoding event endpoints than are speakers of aspect languages (e. g., von Stutterheim and Carroll 2011). In the present study, we test this hypothesis by extending this line of inquiry to Afrikaans, a non-aspect language which is previously unexplored in this regard. Motion endpoint behavior among Afrikaans speakers was measured by means of a linguistic retelling task and a non-linguistic similarity judgment task, and then compared with the behavior of speakers of a non-aspect language (Swedish) and speakers of an aspect language (English). Results showed the Afrikaans speakers' endpoint patterns aligned with Swedish patterns, but were significantly different from English patterns. It was also found that the variation among the Afrikaans speakers could be partially explained by taking into account their frequency of use of English, such that those who used English more frequently exhibited an endpoint behavior that was more similar to English speakers. The current study thus lends further support to the hypothesis that speakers of different languages attend differently to event endpoints as a function of the grammatical category of aspect.

  • 38.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet ; University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Díaz, Manuel
    Stockholms universitet.
    The effects of heritage language instruction on first language proficiency: a psycholinguistic perspective2012In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 15, no 5, 593-609 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effects of weekly heritage language (HL) classes on first language (L1) proficiency in speakers who arrived in the second language (L2)-dominant setting before the onset of puberty. Two groups of L1 Spanish – L2 Swedish bilingual high school students living in Sweden participated in the study. One group currently attended HL classes once a week, whereas the other group was no longer doing so. The two groups did not differ with regard to the total number of years of HL class attendance, age of arrival in Sweden, length of residence or degree of L1 contact. Results from a grammaticality judgement test and a cloze test showed that the group that currently attended HL classes outperformed the non-attending group. Using a framework that emphasises heightened attrition susceptibility among speakers who lost contact with the L1-dominant setting before puberty, the study suggests that HL classes function as a factor that, all other things being equal, may counterweigh attrition susceptibility. Moreover, it is suggested that the effects of HL classes on L1 proficiency are short term rather than long term. That is to say, once attendance ceases the counterweighing effect is less visible.

  • 39.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholms universitet.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholms universitet.
    Age of acquisition effects or effects of bilingualism in second language ultimate attainment?2013In: Sensitive Periods, Language Aptitude, and Ultimate L2 Attainment / [ed] Granena, Gisela & Long, Michael, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, 69-102 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most robust findings in the field of SLA is the different rates of success with which children and adults achieve nativelike proficiency in a L2. Age-related differences have traditionally been explained in terms of the maturational state of the learner. Recently, however, a growing number of accounts hold that age effects in ultimate attainment are due to L1 entrenchment (e.g. Flege 1999; MacWhinney 2005; Ventureyra, Pallier & Yoo 2004). In this view, an increase in L1 proficiency leads to the progressive entrenchment of L1 representations, with the consequence that L2 acquisition becomes more difficult. Inherent in this interpretation is the assumption that the “less L1”, the less it will interfere with the L2. In this paper, we analyse the theoretical underpinnings of the “L1 entrenchment accounts”, and evaluate the existing evidence for and against such claims.

  • 40.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Jarvis, Scott
    Ohio University, USA.
    L2 effects on L1 event conceptualization patterns2011In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 14, no 1, 47-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The finding that speakers of aspect languages encode event endpoints to a lesser extent than do speakers of non-aspect languages has led to the hypothesis that there is a relationship between grammatical aspect and event conceptualization (e.g., von Stutterheim and Nüse, 2003). The present study concerns L1 event conceptualization in 40 L1 Spanish – L2 Swedish bilinguals (all near-native speakers of Swedish). Spanish and Swedish differ as regards grammatical aspect: Whereas Swedish lacks this grammatical category, Spanish conveys aspect through verbal morphology and periphrasis. The principal aim of the study was to explore the relationship between event conceptualization patterns and proficiency with aspectual contrasts. The participants were asked to provide oral L1 Spanish descriptions of video clips projecting motion events with different degrees of endpoint orientation (see von Stutterheim, 2003). In addition, they took a grammaticality judgment test concerning verb and gender agreement, verbal clitics and aspectual contrasts. Compared with baseline data from monolingual Spanish speakers, the results on endpoint encoding show that the bilinguals mention the endpoints of motion events to a higher degree than the Spanish control group does. Moreover, it was shown that the weaker the bilinguals’ discrimination of aspectual errors on the grammaticality judgement test, the more prone they were to encoding endpoints. This result consequently furthers the hypothesis about the interconnectedness between grammatical aspect and event conceptualization. It was suggested that this finding indicate that the bilinguals are influenced by the Swedish-like tendency to attend to the boundedness rather than the ongoingness of events.

  • 41.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language. Stockholm University.
    Ramirez-Galan, Pedro
    Stockholm University.
    Language Aptitude in First Language Attrition: A Study on Late Spanish-Swedish Bilinguals2016In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 37, no 5, 621-638 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language aptitude remains one of the most understudied predictor variables in L1 attrition research. The current study seeks to address this gap by investigating the effects of language aptitude on L1 retention in late attriters. Forty L1 Spanish - L2 Swedish bilinguals living in Sweden participated in the study, along with 20 functionally monolingual L1 speakers of Spanish. L1 proficiency was measured by means of a grammaticality judgement test (GJT) and language aptitude data were obtained through the LLAMA Language Aptitude Test (Meara 2005). Additional data on the participants' linguistic background were also collected. Results revealed a robust difference in GJT scores between the bilinguals and the control group. However, degree of language aptitude was not found to exert a significant influence on the bilinguals' GJT performance. Instead, the only significant predictor for GJT performance was linguistic identification, showing that those participants with strong L1 identification were more accurate in judging L1 grammaticality. The lack of aptitude effects on L1 attrition is discussed against the background of age-related attrition susceptibility.

  • 42.
    Byrman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Lindquist, HansVäxjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.Levin, MagnusVäxjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Korpusar i forskning och undervisning - Corpora in research and teaching: Papers from the ASLA symposium, Växjö 11-12 November 19992000Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Chanson, Audrey
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Traduire les noms propres d'un site touristique: Anthroponymes, toponymes et référents culturels comme marqueurs des stratégies de traduction2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the translation from Swedish to French of « proper nouns » found on a tourism website. The source texts are a selection of webpages from askebyabbey.com, a website dedicated to the ruins of a Swedish Cistercian convent, as well as the transcript of a short 3D-video. The latter, named “datavisualization”, depicts a grouping of farms belonging to the monastery as it was in the mid-15th century.

    This analysis focuses on anthroponyms, toponyms and some cultural referents, and discusses the diverse methods which can be used to translate them, following a kind of typology elaborated  by Michel Ballard in 2001. The purposes of the website – bringing back to life a local and relatively forgotten history with the help of modern digital technics, presenting the actual results of historical and archeological research, and perhaps attracting new scholars interested by conducting historical research – strongly influence the style of the source texts and result in a blend of popular science and pedagogical repetitions, which is not typical of touristic discourse. These aims, sometimes contradictory, can be perceived in the manner the proper nouns are used and translated, in an effort to reach a balance between foreignization and domestication (as Venuti called those practices) in a target-oriented translation. The focus on proper nouns has also been a way to reflect on tendencies in the offered translation and on the difficulties in keeping a coherent strategy when the media for the target texts are of such different nature (written webpages and audio-recorded voice in a video).

  • 44.
    Charles, Maggie
    et al.
    Oxford University.
    Pecorari, DianeHunston, SusanBirmingham University.
    Academic writing: At the interface of corpus and discourse2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Charles, Maggie
    et al.
    Oxford University.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Hunston, Susan
    Birmingham University.
    General Introduction2009In: Academic writing: At the interface of corpus and discourse / [ed] M. Charles, D. Pecorari & S. Hunston, London: Continuum, 2009, 1-10 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Cimbritz, Michael
    et al.
    Ericsson, Stina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Begreppens betydelse: om facktermer i populärvetenskapliga texter och betydelsen för ett svenskt vetenskapsspråk2015In: LU:s femte högskolepedagogiska utvecklingskonferens, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Davidsson, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Alfabetisering - vad innebär det för individen?: En studie om illitteratas väg genom sfi-undervisningen2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den här studien är att undersöka vad det innebär att gå från att vara illitterat till att bli litterat med fokus på den enskilde individen. Syftet är också att undersöka vad den studerande inom så kallade alfabetiseringsprogram anser att undervisningen bör innehålla när det gäller metoder, material och upplägg.

    Studien utgår från frågeställningar om hur informanterna upplever att de blev alfabetiserade och vilka tankar om läsning och skrivning de hade under sin alfabetisering, vilka förändringar de upplever att läs- och skrivinlärningen har inneburit för dem och vilka inställningar de har till alfabetiseringsundervisningens innehåll, utformning och material?

    Metoderna för att få svar på dessa frågor är litteraturstudier i kombination med tre djupintervjuer. Informanterna är personer som har alfabetiserats i Sverige och även studerat svenska inom sfi-undervisning.

    Resultatet visar att alfabetisering, enligt en västerländsk skoltradition, möjliggör för den enskilde individen att bli mer delaktig i samhället, öppnar vägar mot arbete och vidare utbildning, förändrar tankesätt och även beteende i olika avseenden. Alfabetiseringen har inneburit självständighet och ökat självförtroende för informanterna. Lärarens förhållningssätt, delaktighet vid planering av undervisningen och att innehållet präglas av variation och flexibilitet är viktiga förutsättningar för goda studieresultat.

     

  • 48.
    Dekavalla, Georgia
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Terror and Evil in Iraq: A Study of Political Discourse2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    This paper aims to determine the validity of the hypothesis that the effective and eloquent use of language can result in shaping beliefs and altering people’s perception of certain phenomena. In order to explore this hypothesis, a speech given by George W. Bush concerning the Iraq war is examined, followed by a brief study of two corpora, the Time Magazine Corpus and the Corpus of Contemporary American English, where the collocationpatterns of the words Iraq, evil and terror are examined. The paper starts by presenting the main concepts upon which this study is based, i.e. mental frames, the co-operative principle and conversational maxims and finally, various rhetoric devices. An analysis section follows, where George Bush’s speech is examined with the help of the concepts mentioned above and the analysis continues with the corpora-study. One of the conclusions drawn in this study is that, indeed, it is possible that language can be successfully used in order to achieve political means, and that there seems to be a shift in the American public’s perception of concepts such as Iraq and terror, visible in the use of language. However, it cannot be said with certainty whether the Bush Administration has managed to dominate public discourse, through a study as minor as this one.

  • 49.
    Demberg, Rebecca
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Linguistic sexism: A study of sexist language in a British online newspaper2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence of sexist language-use in the British online newspaper The Daily Mail. The material consists of 162 articles that were analysed by using feminist stylistics. The scope of the study was limited to selected features from feminist stylistics at word- and discourse-level. The features of linguistic sexism analysed were the use of gendered generic words, naming of females and males and how female and male characters are described. The gender of the journalists was also analysed to examine if it affected the language-use in terms of sexism. The results show that linguistic sexism is expressed to some extent at both word-level and discourse-level. At word-level linguistic sexism is expressed inthe generic use of some masculine words, the difference of how first name and surname are used to refer to women and men and in the use of titles. At the level of discourse linguistic sexism is expressed in the difference of how women and men are referred to in terms of their relationship to others and in terms of appearance. The gender of the journalist did not show any significance for the language-use in terms of sexism. Considering the limited material of the study, the results might not be suitable for generalisations. The results are nonetheless interesting and it can be concluded that the toolkit of feminist stylistic is relevant to this day and that linguistic sexism exists to some extent in the online version of The Daily Mail.

  • 50.
    Don, Alexanne
    et al.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Hommerberg, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    The language of wine appreciation2011In: Book of Abstracts: ISFC38, Negotiating difference: languages metalanguages, modalities, cultures, 2011, 20-20 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings of an Appraisal analysis of a set of wine reviews composed by Robert Parker, one of the most influential critics of the industry. A set of texts was co-analysed by both researchers and the findings reviewed using reference to Parker’s own glossary of wine terms. The results provide new support for our recognition that semantic categories of Attitude are Field dependent. In order to accommodate the proliferation of semantic fields attracting evaluation in the texts, new sub-categories of Appreciation needed to be proposed, and these extensions to the present system will be the focus of the presentation.

    The Appraisal framework (see for example Martin & White 2005) categorises instances of evaluative language in authentic texts under three main areas: Attitude, Engagement, and Graduation. In this paper we focus on Attitude: Appreciation, and the evaluation of the products of human or natural creation. Sub- categories of Appreciation highlight semantic boundaries between terms that refer to either ‘social value’, ‘composition’, or ‘reaction’.

    Each sub-category of Appreciation has been extended in the light of our analysis, and we suggest that the Appraisal framework needs to be viewed as a semantic template capable of accounting for variation in meaning-making practices via such extensions based on analysis of field-specific corpora.

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