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  • 1.
    Adeniji, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Kulturantropologiska avdelningen.
    Den kulturella kroppen: en jämförelse mellan kosmetisk kirurgi och kvinnlig omskärelse2000Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Adeniji, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Sexualitet som kulturell konstruktion: en diskussion kring kön - genus - sexualitet1998Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Bjälesjö, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School. Rockcity, Hultsfred.
    Delrapport 2: Ungdomsstyrelsen: Rapport Ungdomspolitiskt samarbetsprojekt2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Bjälesjö, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Feeling the blues?2007In: Culture report: progress Europe / [ed] Sebastian Körber, Jenni Roth & Detlef Thelen, Stuttgart: Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen and the Robert Bosch Stiftung in co-operation with the British Council, the Swiss Art Council Pro Helvetia and the Foundation for German-Polish Co-operation , 2007, p. 199-205Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    What are the conditions and processes influencing today’s music business in Europe? With the globalisation of music, researchers in Europe increasingly focus on social changes triggered by music and its role identity development. What are the effects of technological developments on traditional record companies and music consumers? And will the predominance of English pop music prevail in the global music landscape?

  • 5.
    Bjälesjö, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School. Rockcity, Hultsfred.
    Lumbus i Hultsfred – nätverk och mötesplats för ungdomar över 16 år. Lumbusprojektet: Utvärdering/rapport till Ungdomsstyrelsen, Stockholm2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Bjälesjö, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Populärmusik är fin kultur2009In: Impuls: tidskrift för kultur, samhällsfrågor, vuxenutbildning, ISSN 0345-5246, Vol. 42, no 4Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Bjälesjö, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Ungdomars musik2011In: Musik / [ed] Charlotte Åkerman, Lund: Kulturen i Lund , 2011, 1, p. 99-106Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Bjälesjö, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School. Lund University, Sweden.
    Youth Policy - Cooperation between Turkey and Sweden: Ungdomsstyrelsen: Rapport Ungdomspolitiskt samarbetsprojekt2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9. Brunow, Dagmar
    [ Review of ] Sabine Hess & Ramona Lenz Geschlecht und Globalisierung. Ein kulturwissenschaftlicher Streifzug durch transnationale Räume2003In: testcard #12: Linke Mythen / [ed] Roger Behrens, Martin Büsser, Tine Plesch, Johannes Ullmaier, Mainz: Ventil , 2003, p. 276-276Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10. Brunow, Dagmar
    Soundscapes als akustisches Gedächtnis der Stadt: Künstlerische Strategien gegen Gentrifizierung2011In: testcard #20: Access denied / [ed] Jonas Engelmann, Holger Adam, Frank Apunkt Schneider, Sonja Vogel, Johannes Ullmaier, Mainz: Ventil , 2011, p. 37-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Landscapes and the Law: Environmental Politics, Regional Histories, and Contests Over Nature2008Book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    The Agency of the Colonial Subject: Claims and Rights in Forestlands in Early Nineteenth-Century Nilgiris2008In: People of the Jangal: Reformulating Identities and Adaptations in Crisis, New Delhi: Manohar Publishers and Distributors , 2008, p. 223-258Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Uppsala University.
    The Toda Tiger: Debates on Custom, Utility and Rights in Nature, South India 1820–18432006In: Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods and Identities in South Asia / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf and K. Sivaramakrishnan, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2006, p. 65-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Sivaramakrishnan, K.Yale University.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livlihoods, and Identities in South Asia2006Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sivaramakrishnan, K.
    Yale university, USA.
    Introduction: Ecological Nationalisms: Claiming Nature for Making History2005In: Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods and Identities in South Asia / [ed] Cederlöf, G & Sivaramakrishnan, K, New Delhi: Permanent Black , 2005, p. 1-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Sivaramakrishnan, KalyanakrishnanYale University, USA.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods, and Identities in South Asia2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The works presented in this collection take environmental scholarship in South Asia into novel territory by exploring how questions of national identity become entangled with environmental concerns in Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and India. The essays provide insight into the motivations of colonial and national governments in controlling or managing nature, and bring into fresh perspective the different kinds of regional political conflicts that invoke nationalist sentiment through claims on nature. In doing all this, the volume also offers new ways to think about nationalism and, more specifically, nationalism in South Asia from the vantage point of interdisciplinary environmental studies. The contributors to this innovative volume show that manifestations of nationalism have long and complex histories in South Asia. Terrestrial entities, imagined in terms of dense ecological networks of relationships, have often been the space or reference point for national aspirations, as shared memories of Mother Nature or appropriated economic, political, and religious geographies. In recent times, different groups in South Asia have claimed and appropriated ancient landscapes and territories for the purpose of locating and justifying a specific and utopian version of nation by linking its origin to their nature-mediated attachments to these landscapes. The topics covered include forests, agriculture, marine fisheries, parks, sacred landscapes, property rights, trade, and economic development. Gunnel Cederlof is associate professor of history, Uppsala University, Sweden. K. Sivaramakrishnan is professor of anthropology and international studies and director of the South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, at the University of Washington. The other contributors are Nina Bhatt, Vinita Damodaran, Claude A. Garcia, Urs Geiser, Goetz Hoeppe, Bengt G. Karlsson, Antje Linkenbach, Wolfgang Mey, Kathleen D. Morrison, J. P. Pascal, and Sarah Southwold-Llewellyn.

  • 17.
    Ehriander, Helene
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Gåtor från Småland2009In: Speglingar av Småland / [ed] Inger Littberger Caisou-Rousseau, Maria Nilson och Carina Sjöholm, Hestra: Isaberg förlag , 2009, p. 269-272Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, sektionen för humaniora.
    Barnen och det goda boendet: En studie om barn, barnfamiljer och boende i hyreslägenheter2008Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Den gäckande kulturen2007In: Religiösa friskolor i Sverige: Historiska och nutida perspektiv / [ed] Jenny Berglund, Göran Larsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2007, p. 189-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet, etnologiska institutionen.
    En debatt om en muslimsk friskola2000In: Nord nytt - Nordisk tidsskrift for folkelivsforskning, ISSN 0008-1345, Vol. 78, p. 5-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, avdelningen etnologi.
    Globala familjer. Transnationell migration och släktskap. Marita Eastmond och Lisa Åkesson (red.)2009In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 180-183Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet, etnologiska institutionen.
    Likhet inför skollagen?2006In: I&M, Invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 5, p. 29-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet, etnologiska institutionen.
    Muslimsk friskola i Jönköping: Ett möte mellan skilda ideal2006In: Småländska kulturbilder / [ed] Eva Londos, Jönköping: Jönköpings läns museum , 2006, p. 105-120Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Muslimsk skola, svenska villkor: Konflikt, identitet och förhandling2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, sektionen för humaniora.
    Orienten i Sverige. Samtida möten och gränssnitt. Simon Ekström och Lena Gerholm (red.)2008In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 173-176Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet, etnologiska institutionen.
    Recension av: Almgren, Suzanne Mason, Life in the Labyrinth: A reflexive exploration of research and politics.2002In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 3, p. 223-226Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, avdelningen etnologi.
    Recension av: Bäckman, Maria, Miljonsvennar: omstridda platser och identiteter2010In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 1, p. 53-55Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, sektionen för humaniora.
    Recension av: Båtshake, Helene: Lena lär lyda2007In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 101-104Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, sektionen för humaniora.
    Recension av: Olwig, Karen Fog och Paerregaard, Karstenn(red): Integration: Antropologiske perspektiver och av: Pedersen, Marianne Holm och Rytter, Mikkel (red) Den stille integration.2009In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 39, p. 202-206Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Vinna eller försvinna?: Fostran till humankapital i 2000-talets skola2003In: Kunskapssamhällets marknad / [ed] Markus Idvall, Fredrik Schoug, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2003, p. 57-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Lund university.
    Fioretos, Ingrid
    Lund university.
    Norström, Eva
    Lund university.
    Att få vara en person2010In: I&M, Invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 5-6, p. 48-51Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Sternudd, Hans T.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Music and Art.
    Ridiculing Suffering on YouTube: Digital Parodies of Emo Style2016In: Blunt Traumas: Negotiating Suffering and Death / [ed] Nate Hinerman, Holly Lynn Baumgartner, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2016, p. 31-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous YouTube videos represent and comment on self-injury, as evidenced bya search for this term, which produces about 123,000 results (6 June 2014). Inprevious studies, we have explored how suffering, the body, and gender areperformed in such personal videos. During our YouTube study, we have alsoencountered a specific category of video clips that merits further discussion: videosthat in different ways attempt to parody or make fun of self-injury and mentaldistress. What most of them have in common is that they focus on self-injury aspart of the so-called emo subculture or emo style. The purpose of this chapter is todiscuss what such videos tell us about cultural conceptions of suffering and gender.Our analysis builds on a small sample of three YouTube videos in which emoculture and mental distress are parodied and ridiculed through exaggeration. Wedemonstrate that the parodies revolve around two main points: emo as a stylisedperformance of suffering, and emo as queer masculinity. The chapter concludes bysuggesting that this ridiculing of emo culture builds upon discourses of hegemonicmasculinity and normative heterosexuality which are also likely to haveconsequences for the understanding of mental suffering, emotional sensitivity, andgender in a broader context.

  • 33.
    Kümmerling-Meibauer, Bettina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Surmatz, AstridLinnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Beyond Pippi Longstocking: Intermedial and International Aspects of Astrid Lindgren's Works2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Liliequist, Marianne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Westum, Asbjörg
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gränsbygdens folk: Glesbygdens självbilder - en jämförelse mellan Lierne i Norge och Frostviken i Sverige2017In: Brännpunkt Norrland: Perspektiv på en region i förändring / [ed] Anders Öhman, Bo Nilsson, Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017, p. 236-262Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet behandlar lokal och regional identitet i gränstrakterna mellan Frostviken i nordvästra Jämtland och Lierne i Tröndelag, Norge. Med hjälp av djupintervjuer, deltagande observation och autoetnografisk metod urskiljer författarna kollektiva berättelser  med anknytning till lokal och regional identitet på vardera sidan om nationsgränsen. I Lierne finns en positiv syn på den egna kulturen och en stark identifikation med bygden. Frostviksbornas självbild är också positiv, men har påverkats i negativ riktning av den svenska offentliga urbana diskursen. 

  • 35.
    Palmsköld, Anneli
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rosenqvist, JohannaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Music and Art. Konstfack.Almevik, GunnarThe Royal Swedish Academy of Letters History and Antiquities.
    Crafting Cultural Heritage2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The making of artefacts is a core activity in society, the result of which contributes to the building up of our physical surroundings and material culture. Throughout history, craft skills have been highly appreciated and have often been seen as crucial component of a capable human. Despite this, the knowledge base that constitutes the actual making is often overlooked in research. What can we learn about things by learning about their making? How do different craft skills offer an understanding of its historical use? How can theoretical and methodological approaches be developed concerning the actual making? How can we study and understand craft as cultural heritage? This book contains a selecion of papers from the session Crafting Cultural Heritage at the Assosiation of Critical Heritage studies inaugural conference Re/theorising Heritage 2012 in Gothenburg. The contributors are Anneli Palmsköld; Thomas Laurien; Eleonora Lupo and Elena Giunta; Gunnar Almevik and Nicola Donovan. Their common interest are theories and methods of crafting that could benefit heritage studies approach to making.

  • 36.
    Pemunta, Ngambouk Vitalis
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Tabenyang, Tabi Chama-James
    Walter Sisulu University, South Africa.
    Fubah, Mathias Alubafi
    University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Communitarianism and the Obasinjom mask performance as ritual healing among the Bayang and Ejagham of Southwest Cameroon2014In: Rituals: practices, ethnic and cultural aspects in emotional healing / [ed] Alley Parish, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2014, 1, p. 1-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper combines ethnographic fieldwork and traditional African philosophy to examine the role of the Obasinjom masquerade’s witch hunting ritual performance in individual and community therapy among Bayang and Ejagham ethnicities of Southwest Cameroon. They are a crossborder Bantoid people living in both Southwest Cameroon and Southeastern Nigeria with common sociocultural and sociopolitical institutions including cult agencies (secret societies). Aside from sharing a common world view characterised by the entanglement between the material and immaterial realms, they further believe in reincarnation and see death as a transition from the material universe into the immaterial world of the ancestors. Accordingly, elders and traditional rulers are believed to be intermediaries between the worlds of the living and those of the dead. Like other African people, they have both a personalistic and naturalistic disease theory system and share a wide variety of ritual medicines for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Illnesses believed to be caused by personalistic agents-witchcraft are the domain of the Obasinjom cult agency-the god of medicine-which is physically represented by a speaking mask. The mask is believed to be omniscient and endowed with clairvoyance and supernatural powers. Through the dual processes of revelation and `remembrance’, Obasinjom connects the past, present and charts the future. This is done by using its supernatural powers to trace and unveil the mediating object and circumstances through which the malevolent spirit gained access to its victim. It is therefore involved in recreating the `biography’ (Kopytoft, 1986) of how the malevolent spirit gained access to its victim’s life essence. The Obasinjom mask is transformed through ritual performance from a banal into a ritual object thereby relating it to persons and events and attributing to it a biography and agency. This essay documents the specific role of the Obasinjom mask as overall controller over ritual medicine. The paper also examines the diffusion and subsequent appropriation of the Obasinjom cult agency by other Cameroonian ethnicities for ensuring community health and well-being because of its detective role in exposing witchcraft practices and criminal activities. Grounded in the African world view of health and personhood, the essay demonstrates that the Obasinjom cult agency’s performative ritual healing is a recreation of community sentiments among participants.

  • 37.
    Rosenqvist, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences. Lunds universitet.
    Crafting Cultural Heritage?: Introduction to a session2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Rosenqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Carlgren, MariaGöteborgs universitet.Fagerström, LindaMacLeod, Katarina Wadstein
    Genuspedagogiska gärningar: Subversiv och affirmativ aktion2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Rosenqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Music and Art.
    Palmsköld, Anneli
    University of Gothenburg.
    Att göra genus2015In: Konsthantverk i Sverige, del 1 / [ed] Christina Zetterlund, Charlotte Hyltén-Cavallius, Johanna Rosenqvist, Tumba: Konstfack collection , 2015, p. 33-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    “Konsthantverkande”, att göra konsthantverk, omfattar såväl handarbetande som konstskapande. Genom historien har detta skapande iscensatts och genomförts i skilda rum. Dessa rum har tillåtit olika grader av rörelsefrihet för de fysiska kroppar som aktivt har deltagit i produktionen. Skilda iscensättningar av görandet har styrts av föreställningar om hur tillverkning kan gå till, vem/vilka som bör utföra den och under vilka villkor den kan utövas. Med tekniken virkning som utgångspunkt diskuteras i kapitlet hur genusmönster speglar sig i förståelsen av konsthantverkets material och tekniker. Vi belyser denna relation genom några olika perspektiv. Vi börjar i en utblick mot olika sätt att betrakta görande och genus och därefter diskuteras hemmet som rum och produktionsplats vilka ligger till grund för vår förståelse. Därefter följer en presentation av virkningens historia och teknik. Med detta vill vi skapa en plattform för att diskutera kroppar, rörelser och rum i relation till virkningens praktik.

  • 40.
    Rosenqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Music and Art.
    Palmsköld, Anneli
    Doing gender, making differenceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Rosenqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Music and Art. Lunds universitet.
    Palmsköld, AnneliLunds universitet.Almevik, Gunnar
    Crafting Cultural Heritage2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The making of artefacts is a core activity in society, the result of which contributes to the building up of our physical surroundings and material culture. Throughout history, craft skills have been highly appreciated and have often been seen as crucial component of a capable human. Despite this, the knowledge base that constitutes the actual making is often overlooked in research within humanities. In this publication we discuss theories and methods of crafting that might benefit cultural heritage studies approach to making, from the artistic, historical, or aesthetical point of view. We deal with discussions on questions such as: What can we learn about things by learning about their making? How do different craft skills offer an understanding of its historical use? How can theoretical and methodological approaches be developed concerning the actual making?

  • 42.
    Sternudd, Hans T.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Music and Art.
    Johansson, Anna
    HUMlab, Umeå University.
    The Girl in the Corner: Aesthetics of Suffering in a Digitalized Space2015In: Narratives of Suffering: Meaning and Experience in a Transcultural Approach / [ed] Lolita Guimarães Guerra, Jose A. Nicdao, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2015, p. 105-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet may provide the means for otherwise marginalized groups – such asyoung people with mental health problems – to make their voices heard in public,and online representations are therefore an important source for studying howemotions are conceptualized and communicated in these groups. In an on-goingstudy of YouTube video montages on the subject of self-injury, we have found oneemblematic and frequently occurring character: a girl sitting alone in a corner, onthe floor, with drawn up knees and head bent down. Images of this character arewidespread, not only on YouTube but also on blogs, discussion forums and websites.Together with her likewise sitting ‘sisters’ – the girl on the swing, the girl on the pierand on the railway track – she is taken to represent young people’s unhappiness, painand misery. Our chapter sets out to explore in greater detail how this characteremerges as a signifier of gendered suffering in online contexts. We argue that itcontributes to an aestheticization of suffering that often seems to emanate from therejection of conventional ideals and hegemonic definitions of normality; theembracing of suffering might, thus, be used as a strategy for achieving socialdistinction. Also, we suggest in our chapter that the girl in the corner and similarrepresentations may be seen as facilitating certain emotional identifications,especially as regards gender.

  • 43.
    Werner, Ann
    Södertörns högskola.
    Sexy Shapes: Girls negotiating gender through popular music2013In: Girlhood Studies, ISSN 1938-8209, E-ISSN 1938-8322, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on ethnographic fieldwork done with a group of 14 to 16 year-old girls in a medium sized Swedish town. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between everyday music use and gender, ethnicity and sexuality. The question posed here is: "What negotiations take place when the girls discuss their favorite music and artists?" Research in response to this question shows that the identity work of negotiating how to be a teenage girl often relates to popular culture. The sample focuses on girls from Swedish, Bosnian, Turkish and Syrian backgrounds. In this article I report on the local ideas about gender and ethnicity claimed by the girls to influence their discussion of music, dress and behavior, as well as the desires that I argue structure such discussion. This research supports contemporary findings that mainstream popular music has cultural and social significance in young girls' lives.

  • 44.
    Werner, Ann
    Södertörns högskola.
    Traditionella kvinnor: Naturen och den samiska populärmusiken2012In: Senmoderna reflexioner: Festskrift till Johan Fornäs / [ed] Erling Bjurström, Martin Fredriksson, Ulf Olsson och Ann Werner, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 193-201Chapter in book (Other academic)
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