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  • 1.
    Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    The Sandby Borg Massacre: Interpersonal Violence and the Demography of the Dead2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 210-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During excavations of the Iron Age ringfort of Sandby borg (ad 400-550), the remains of twenty-six unburied bodies were encountered inside and outside the buildings. The skeletons and the archaeological record indicate that after the individuals had died the ringfort was deserted. An osteological investigation and trauma analysis were conducted according to standard anthropological protocols. The osteological analysis identified only men, but individuals of all ages were represented. Eight individuals (31 per cent) showed evidence of perimortem trauma that was sharp, blunt, and penetrating, consistent with interpersonal violence. The location of the bodies and the trauma pattern appear to indicate a massacre rather than a battle. The 'efficient trauma' distribution (i.e. minimal but effective violence), the fact that the bodies were not manipulated, combined with the archaeological context, suggest that the perpetrators were numerous and that the assault was carried out effectively. The contemporary sociopolitical situation was seemingly turbulent and the suggested motive behind the massacre was to gain power and control.

  • 2.
    Colomer, Laia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Stones, Books and Flags: Born and the Role of Archaeological Heritage Management under the Barcelona Model2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 111-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1980s, Barcelona's local institutions have been pioneers in creating a close relationship between culture, urban regeneration, and the social and economic development of the city, and subsequently in implementing a new paradigm in cultural policy for entrepreneurial, cultural, and creative cities. As a consequence, the city has also become a model for place branding and cultural tourism. In this context, Born, an archaeological site of the early eighteenth century which offers detailed testimony to both the cultural and economic lifestyle of the city at that time and the defeat of the Catalans during the War of the Spanish Succession, has been preserved and opened to the public in line with the city's varying cultural policies and attitudes to national identity over the last two decades. This article discusses Born from 2000 to 2017 and the political and cultural management context in relation to the Barcelona model that has defined its current form as a cultural centre. In this context, this article also discusses the role of archaeology in Barcelona's cultural governance, as a case study through which to consider the role of urban archaeological heritage management today.

  • 3.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of Blaze O'Connor, Gabriel Cooney and John Chapman, eds, (Prehistoric Society Research Paper 3, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2009, 191pp., 93 b/w illustr., 8 colour plates, hbk, ISBN 978-1-84217-377-0)2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 251-253Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Can you hear me at the back? Archaeology, communication and society2007In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 10, no 2/3, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Comments on Suzie Thomas: Collaborate, Condemn, or Ignore? Responding to Non-Archaeological Approaches to Archaeological Heritage2015In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 333-334Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Real Archeology: The Medialization of archeological Knowledge in the Field of Tension between Science and Public2013In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 580-582Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of M. Kircher (2012), Wa(h)re Archäologie: Die Medialisierung archäologischen Wissens im Spannungsfeld von Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit Bielefeld: transcript., ISBN 38376203792013In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 580-582Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The past in our lives: two archaeological novels. Review of R. Martin, The Sorrow of Archaeology, and J. Hildebrandt, Fördömd2006In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 9, no 2/3, p. 287-290Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The Past is Now: An interview with Anders Högberg2008In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 7-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Anders Högberg is a Swedish archaeologist whose research offers an original perspective on prehistoric flint technology but he has also been directing some innovative projects in archaeological teaching and learning. In this interview I am exploring some of the ideas that have been guiding his work in both realms. Although part of the interview is about work conducted in the past, equal weight is given to new opportunities and developments that affect the future of archaeology. Anders Högberg's ideas cannot be said to be typical or representative for any larger community, but he is operating in very specific historic circumstances that are shared to a greater or lesser extent by many other archaeologists living and working today. This interview documents the particular views on material culture, public archaeology, and the field of archaeology more generally that were held by one European archaeologist in 2008.

  • 10.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bronze Age Connections: Cultural Contact in Prehistoric Europe2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 304-306Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Childhood in the Past2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 119-120Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Larsson, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Review: Kossian, Rainer, Bartholomäus, Werner A; Hunte 1: ein mittel- bis spätneolithischer und frühbronzezeitlicher Siedlungsplatz am Dümmer, Ldkr. Diepholz (Niedersachsen). ISBN 978-3-938078-03-72010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 1-3Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of a very important book (in German) regarding a famous site in Niedersachsen. A site excavated in the 1930´s with several housefoundations and a very rich fins matewrial.

  • 13.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Mats Larsson. Life and Death in the Mesolithic of Sweden (Oxford: Oxbow, 2017, 144pp., 61 illustr., hbk, ISBN 978-1-78-570385-0)2018In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 658-660Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    The Many Archaeologies of Ritual: [Review of] Anna Lucia d’Agata and Aleydis Van de Moortel, eds, Archaeologies of Cult. Essays on Ritual and Cult in Crete in honor of Geraldine C. Gesell. (Hesperia supplement 42, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 2009, 354 pp., 146 illus., pbk, ISBN 978 0 87661 542 3) and Evangelos Kyriakides, ed., The Archaeology of Ritual (Cotsen Advanced Seminars 3, Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, 2007, 331 pp., illustr., pbk, ISBN 978 1 931745 47 5)2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 389-392Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Skoglund, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Bradley, Richard
    Navigating Inland: Bronze Age Watercraft and the Lakes of Southern Sweden2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
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