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  • 1.
    Sellbjer, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    “Have you read my comments? It is not noticeable. Change!”: An analysis of feedback given to students who have failed examinations.2018In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 163-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to examine what characterizes feedback regarding the group of students who receive the most comments compared to the rest of the students, all failing at least one task. Could it be that teachers comment differently on the most underperforming students? Menade du: En brist i tidigare studier har varit att Till skillnad från flertalet studier kring feedback bygger studien på ett större

    The empirical material consists of feedback handed out to students following a teacher training programme and is examined on the basis of a descriptive analytical investigation.  The analysis is based on four methods: the type of errors made, the number of times a student makes the same mistake, what kind of feedback was provided, and ‘de-motivational’ comments. One result is that underperforming students receive more feedback on their choice of relevant literature and on the qualification of the answer. Another result is that they receive substantially more ‘de-motivational’ ones as well as a higher proportion of the most negative and disparaging comments. A recommendation for further research is to separate feedback that is related to the qualities of the students’ work from what characterizes the teacher’s comments whatever aspect of the work is being commented on.

  • 2.
    Sellbjer, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Meaning in constant flow: University teachers’ understanding of examination tasks2017In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 182-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective feedback presupposes that students understand the task on which feedback is given. But what about the teachers formulating and assessing the task? Do they always understand it as intended? And if so, feedback on what? The purpose of this study is to examine how university teachers individually understand tasks distributed to students. Does interpretation differ if the teachers themselves try to solve the task, discuss the solution with other teachers, as well as trying to formulate better versions of the task? The theoretical framework rests upon a hermeneutic understanding of reality. There is thereby reason to doubt the possibility of information transfer and the understanding of feedback as a strict rational process. The empirical material is collected in connection with a development work and sections where the participants expressed uncertainty considering the interpretation of the task were transcribed. The empirical material shows that teachers interpret a task somewhat differently when examining it more carefully, on their own and together with other teachers. It also shows that the same teacher vacillate in his/her interpretation of a task when examined more thoroughly. Consequently feedback given to students also differs. The drift of meaning is probably quite minor, but still noteworthy.

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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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