lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Lindberg, Leif
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Is "Pedagogik" as an Academic Discipline in Sweden just a Phenomenon for the Twentieth Century?: The Effects of Recent Education Reform.2002In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 65-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n this article, the disciplinary transitions of Pedagogik in Sweden during the last century are examined. The material used includes written expert assessments, inaugural lectures, syllabuses, descriptions of teaching and research duties, governmental reports and research activities. Three different periods are detectable. From the first decade until the mid-century, an embryonic stage of psychometrics and intelligence testing could be observed. From mid-century up to the mid-1970s, a neo-behaviouristic paradigm was growing strong and dominated school research and a new teacher education was launched, supported with professorships in school research. From the mid-1970s up to the turn of the century, research was characterised by a variety of research perspectives and approaches. The conception of the discipline seems to be stable but under development. Parliamentarians searched for another knowledge base for teacher education than Pedagogik at the end of this period. There is evidence of Pedagogik moving towards an interdisciplinary approach, but there are also contradictory movements.

  • 2.
    Lindqvist, Per
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Nordänger, Ulla Karin
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Landahl, Joakim
    Insurance and Assurance - Teachers´strategies in the regimes of risk and audit2009In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 508-519Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Nordin, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Making the Lisbon strategy happen: a new phase of lifelong learning discourse in European policy?2011In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discourse of lifelong learning has undergone great changes, from its initial

    engagement when it was a matter of social and humanitarian issues as outlined in the early documents

    of UNESCO, to emphasising lifelong learning as a moral and individual obligation in a more

    competitive and market-oriented language. This policy trajectory has taken the discourse from an

    initial phase of great social visions to a second phase focusing on the need for self-regulated and

    morally responsible citizens. Recent research on the topic indicates that we are now standing at the

    threshold of a discursive shift where action instead of visions is at stake. Against this background the

    author asks if there is evidence enough to suggest that European policy on lifelong learning is now

    experiencing a discursive shift into what could be described as a new phase. The author uses critical

    discourse analysis as a methodological framework and the analysis of the empirical material points to a

    direction where it is relevant to speak about a new ‘phase’ of lifelong-learning discourse emerging in

    European policy, characterised by the urgent need for implementation. In this article a tentative

    conceptual framework is presented as to how this new, action-oriented ‘phase’ can be understood.

  • 4.
    Nordin, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Towards a European policy discourse on compulsory education: The case of Sweden2017In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 474-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to show how the European Union (EU) and the Swedish government have recently become co-producers of education policy that increasingly emphasises compulsory education. The paper draws on the following two kinds of empirical material: 1) an analysis of central official policy documents produced by the EU and the Swedish government; and 2) documents related to the development, communication and implementation of country-specific recommendations within the EU, using Sweden as the national policy arena. Theoretically, the paper is inspired by discursive institutionalism and uses critical discourse analysis for the systematic analysis. The result shows that beginning around the mid-2000s, both the EU and the Swedish government have demonstrated an increased interest in compulsory education as a solution to a wide range of societal and individual problems. Initially, the coordination of policy concerned with compulsory education was communicated implicitly, discursively embedded into a variety of policy areas. From 2013 onwards, however, the result shows the emergence of a new and more explicit European policy discourse on compulsory education, which is discussed as an interesting area of research still in its infancy.

  • 5.
    Nordin, Andreas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Sundberg, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Travelling concepts in national curriculum policy-making: The example of competencies2016In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 314-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we will address the impact of Europeanisation on national curriculum reforms with empirical reference to the Swedish compulsory school, and based on the concept of competence discuss the question of transnational curriculum convergence. The main interest is directed towards how the answers to the question of what counts as knowledge and skills are changing in national curricula. The analysis shows that the recent Swedish compulsory school reform converges to the broader European knowledge discourse on the underlying level of philosophical ideas but also that several core concepts used in European policy texts are being reconceptualised and given a different meaning when re-contextualised in the national arena.

  • 6.
    Sivesind, Kirsten
    et al.
    Oslo University, Norway.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Curriculum on the European policy agenda: Global transitions and learning outcomes from transnational and national points of view2016In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue examines curricula and their histories as they have evolved throughout the 21st century as part of transnational and national education policies. With a specific focus on the policy transitions that are taking place in Europe, the articles demonstrate how curriculum makingprocesses move in different directions, following their own reform cycles despite globalizationand internationalization. At the same time, a third wave of transnational policy transitions seems to be taking place, such that international organizations like the European Union have intervened in curriculum decisions regarding compulsory schooling within national contexts. The articles within this special issue draw on different epistemologies and methodologies and, thus, contribute to analytical frameworks and provide a variety of lenses for understanding and exploring howcurriculum making processes respond to and re-contextualize processes and expectations beyond national and global contexts.

  • 7.
    Sundberg, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    From 'Pedagogik' to educational sciences?: Higher education reform, institutional settings and disciplinary formations of educational science in Sweden2007In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 393-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to address the question of Pedagogik as an academic discipline in Sweden based on a social study of the science’s point of departure. The philosophical and epistemological issues which constitute the conceptual questions about the nature and content of educational science are, although crucial, peripheral to this article. The article is concerned with the general consequences of the formation of the discipline due to ongoing changes and reforms in Swedish higher education. Text analysis of self-evaluations of education departments in Sweden provide the material for a critical examination of the changing institutional settings for educational sciences. Three general tension fields are highlighted in the ongoing formation of the discipline: Pedagogik as a discipline opposing segmentation and professional specialisation, Pedagogik in relation to other disciplines/subjects in the university system, and the pragmatic specialisation of professional knowledge. The ‘boundary work’ of the education departments in the positions they take in these tension fields is highlighted and analysed. Studying discipline formation processes can serve, in this regard, to deepen the reflexive self-understanding of the producers and users of educational knowledge. The article concludes with some outlines for further empirical research on the formation of the discipline of Swedish Pedagogik.

  • 8.
    Sundberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Örebro University.
    Standards-based Curricula in a Denationalised Conception
of Education: the Case of Sweden2012In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 342-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine the development of the Swedish educational reform of 1991 from an international and European perspective, and from the perspective of what counts as knowledge in a recently implemented Swedish curriculum reform. With effect from 2011, the Swedish government has significantly reshaped the curricula for preschool, compulsory school and upper secondary school education, but in terms of governing principles for schools, these curriculum reforms can be regarded as a continuation of the 1991 reform. We argue that this latest reform, as part of an international policy discourse, can be said to represent a denationalised and instrumental conception of education, and that the implications for the formation of knowledge within this conception can be understood as a standards-based curriculum shaped by two powerful international influences: a technical-instrumental discourse of curriculum, emphasising the form, structure and function of the curriculum; and a neo-conservative discourse of curriculum, with an emphasis on curriculum content as a given and uncontested body of knowledge.

  • 9.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Örebro universitet.
    A European space for education looking for its public2010In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 432-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open method of coordination (OMC) within the Lisbon strategy is discussed in terms of a European Space for Education and ‘programme ontology’. The focus is on indicators and the European dimension, and how they ‘work’ in the forming of contents and identities in this European Space for Education. The OMC is analyzed in relation to Nancy Fraser’s theoretical public-sphere approach of discourses about needs, instead of inquiry from needs. Central to the article is the problematization of the shift from national theories and methodologies to theories that might be better suited to an international European educational arena. Hence, in the final part of the article, the publicsphere theory is discussed from the point of view of globalization and within a transnational frame for education.

  • 10.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    A third wave of European education policy: Transnational and national conceptions of knowledge in Swedish curricula2016In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 298-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to examine how transnational concepts within educational policies influencenational curricula in the reconceptualisation of educational policy into concrete curriculum texts.Based on a critical discourse analysis and the concepts of recontextualisation, convergenceand divergence, a third wave of European policy discourse has been identified, emphasising anincreasing interest in compulsory school and curriculum. Analyses of policies and pedagogicaltexts show a convergence between a European and a Swedish knowledge discourse concerningstandards, basic skills and a performance-based curriculum; however, there is a divergence interms of transversal skills in transnational policy documents compared to an emphasis on schoolsubjects in the Swedish curriculum. In the transnational arena, the concept of knowledge is mainlyinterpreted in terms of competencies, while in the Swedish curriculum – the Curriculum forthe Compulsory School, Preschool Class and the Leisure-Time Centre 2011 – knowledge isunderstood in more traditional terms and includes abilities within subjects

  • 11.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Democracy and curriculum—the task still before us2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how John Dewey’s concept of democracy can contribute to our understandingof what is required from education amid growing nationalism and populism, even in what are usuallyperceived as established democracies. The purpose of the study is to explore how standardsbasedcurricula for citizenship education can be problematised in relation to the broad concept ofdemocracy. The meaning of citizenship education in curricula is examined through two cases fromwestern countries (Sweden and the USA) with standards-based curricula. These social studiescurricula deal with democracy as something ‘to teach about’, rather than focusing on helpingstudents learn to understand and recreate democracy for their own generation. However, theconcept of democracy, as a moral and ethical ideal, becomes difficult to express in a curriculumlogic of standards and knowledge outcomes emphasising measurability. Now, when democracy ischallenged, also seems to be the right time to confront the logic of a standards-based curriculumand the selective traditions of subjects within the social studies, as well as to ask the questions‘why?’ and ‘what for?’ in relation to basic social values and students’ competences.

  • 12.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Equity: policy rhetoric or a matter of meaning of knowledge?: Towards a framework for tracing the 'efficiency-equity' doctrine in curriculum documents2014In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 731-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the focus is on exploring the perspective of equity in curriculum. From a background of understanding curriculum as imbedded in wider transnational policy movements, the author suggests a framework for exploring the trajectories between equity policy and different types of curricula with implications for what counts as knowledge, drawing on the capabilities approach developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. The analysis highlights the instrumental, intrinsic and positional values in terms of actual functionings, expanding the individual’s set of capabilities and a pluralistic learning environment. The results suggest that the technical form of the curriculum can have determining effects on the meaning of knowledge acquisition and that the capabilities approach offers an important frame of analysis for understanding  how different aspects of equity are included or excluded in curriculum. 

     

  • 13.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Örebro universitet.
    Understanding the universal right to education as jurisgenerative politics and democratic iterations2009In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 520-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT This article examines how the universal human right to education can be understood in terms of what Seyla Benhabib considers ‘democratic iterations’. Further, by referring to the concept of jurisgenerative politics, Benhabib argues that a democratic people reinterpret guiding norms and principles which they find themselves bound to, through iterative acts, so that they are not only the subjects but also the authors of laws. By examining the use of the Article of the universal right to education in the European Convention on Human Rights, not as an Article with an unambiguous meaning, but as an Article which from its very start was the subject of different interpretations and desires, the author argues for an understanding of the process of transforming universal rights into national law and norms as democratic iterations. This way of conceiving democratic iterations is examined empirically, with Sweden as an example, by analyses of three different discursive arenas: a political/legal arena; an arena concerning political contests over independent schools; and a more limited arena for advocating denominational schools. The conclusion is that two different disjunctions – between universal norms and national self-determination and between law as power and law as meaning – are productive interspaces for renegotiating and rearticulating universal law into local/national norms

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf