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  • 1.
    Einarsdottir, Johanna
    et al.
    University of Island, Island.
    Purola, Anna-Maija
    University of Oulo, Finland.
    Johansson, Eva Marianne
    University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Broström, Stig
    University of Aahus, Denmark.
    Emilson, Anette
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Democracy, caring and competence: values perspectives in ECEC curricula in the Nordic countries2015In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 97-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to explore how Nordic Early Childhood Education and Carepolicies frame values education in preschools with a special focus on the values ofdemocracy, caring and competence. The study is part of a larger Nordic project, Valueseducation in Nordic preschools: Basis of education for tomorrow, the aim of which isto explore values education from various perspectives, policy levels, institutional levelsand personal levels. The study applies Habermas’s theoretical ideas of communicativeactions, lifeworld, and the system. Here the focus is on the system level, namely, valuesin national curriculum guidelines that serve as the basis of pedagogical practices inpreschools in the Nordic countries. Thematic research analysis described by Braun andClarke inspired the qualitative analysis of the documents. In addition, a quantitativelanguage-based approach was applied to the study. Keywords related with democratic,caring and competence values were selected. The findings reveal different dimensionsand meanings of the three value fields, such as democracy as being and/or becoming;care as fulfilment of basic needs and an ethical relationship; and competence values aslearning for sociality and academic skills.

  • 2.
    Emilson, Anette
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Johansson, Eva
    Universitetet i Stavanger, Norway.
    Participation and gender in circle-time situations in pre-school2013In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 56-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sought to investigate participatory values in relation to gender, asexpressed in interactions between teachers and children in circle-time situations inSwedish and Norwegian preschools. This paper reports evidence from threeresearch questions: How is children’s participation conditioned in circle-timesituations? How are participatory values communicated to girls and boys? andWhat gender-related patterns emerge in teacherchild interactions in circletimesituations? The study is informed by Habermas’ concepts of strategic andcommunicative actions, as well as Davies’ idea of duality, the bi-polarity, betweenfemininity and masculinity. Data consist of video observations of teacher andchild interactions during circle time. The results show that children’s participationis conditional on children’s own willingness to participate, and on teachers’willingness to involve the children in a communicative action. Data reveal that thegirls are more likely to take the initiative than boys and appear more comfortable insuch an active position. It was also noted that there is a tendency for practitioners tointerpret and value male and female traits as oppositional behaviours.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Eva
    et al.
    University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Emilson, Anette
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Conflicts and resistance: Potentials for democracy learning in preschool2016In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 19-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to develop knowledge about learning for democracy in ECEC, through investigating acts of resistance in conflicts and examine these as potentials for democracy learning. The study is informed by Mouffe’s theoretical ideas about conflicts as a prerequisite for democracy. The research questions are: What kind of conflicts can be identified in everyday interactions in preschool? How do children and teachers express and maintain resistance in conflicts? What potentials for democracy learning are there in such acts? Data consist of video observations of interactions in four Swedish preschools. The analyses of the interactions comprised various readings to identify expressions of conflicts and ways to communicate resistance. Ethical considerations were paramount to ensure that the studies met the ethical requirements. Identified conflicts are described in terms of qualities of space: (a) Space for diversity illustrates openness for different opinions to be articulated and heard: (b) Space for unity illustrates how alliance building and authority create conditions and restrictions for opinions to be articulated, heard and/or neglected. Playfulness, courage and emotions are important traits for resistance and both agonism and antagonism appear to be at play. The conflicts identified offer both possibilities and obstacles in learning for democracy.

  • 4.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    ICT in preschool: friendor foe? The significance of norms in a changing practice2012In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 422-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Societal change and prescriptions in curricula demand a change in educationalpractice. This can create conflicts between practitioners’ usual practices (norms)and those prescribed by curricula. One example is the introduction of Informationand Communication Technology (ICT) into preschool practice. Hence, our aim isto analyse how norms are used as arguments for or against using computers inpreschool practice. Data consist of naturalistic texts from 31 preschool teacherstudents revealing their experiences in attempting to embed computers intopractice. Results show ambivalence to computer use. Two lines of argumentsemerged: one embracing the new technology, the other rejecting this newtechnology. The following arguments were made to justify ICT in preschool: thechild as a citizen, the competent child and the active child. Concern wasexpressed between the teacher’s need for control and the child’s need forindependence and guidance.

  • 5.
    Magnusson, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Pramling, Niklas
    University of Gothenburg.
    In ‘Numberland’: play-based pedagogy in response to imaginative numeracy2018In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 24-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching interest of this study concerns how to outline learning opportunities and support in early childhood education (ECE) without losing its play-based character. More specifically, the study reports an empirical investigation into the evolving activity of a 6.5-year-old child and an adult conversing about the child’s drawing of ‘Numberland’. What the child’s drawing and his discussion about it with the adult tell us about his emergent mathematics skills is analysed. How the child shifts between speaking and enacting as if and as is, and how the adult supports his mathematics understanding through entering into the play-frame are analysed. How imaginary, play-based activities like this can provide the means for ECE and what this implies for the teacher are discussed.

  • 6.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Collective and individual perspectives on preschool mathematics within a professional development programme2019In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 306-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores collective and individual perspectives onpreschool mathematics within a professional developmentprogramme. All seven teachers at one Swedish preschoolparticipated in a one-year research-based professionaldevelopment programme. At the beginning and then again at theend of the programme, the teachers collectively wrote down theirgoals for mathematics teaching at the preschool. In the article,these goals will be compared to three teachers’individual writingsduring the year. This comparison indicates that the professionaldevelopment of these teachers may have been collective, but notjoint, as the collectively written goals seem to imply slightlydifferent things for the individual teachers. Thus, what may looklike collective goals for the teaching of mathematics at onepreschool may in fact imply quite large differences in themathematics teaching of individual teachers. If collectiveprofessional development programmes are to have an impact,differences between teachers need to be made visible and, as anext step, be the basis for the development of professionallanguage as well as evaluation and planning of preschoolmathematics and further professional development.

  • 7.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Using tablet computers in preschool: How does the design of applications influence participation, interaction and dialogues?2015In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 365-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results in this article explore whether and how the design of applications used on tablet computers influences the interaction and dialogues that occur between children and pedagogues, the participation of children in the activities and the mathematics that can be learned. While mathematics offered a lens to explore the use of tablet devices, child–teacher interactions is the focus of this article. Twelve pedagogues were observed as they used different applications with 25 preschool children. These applications were categorised based on their classification (boundaries of the application) and framing (form of the application). It was shown that the same pedagogue interacted differently with the children based on the application they were using. Further, the children’s participation as well as the structure and content of the dialogues between pedagogues and children differed based on classification and the framing of the application used. The results indicate that the design of the applications influences the pedagogues and the educational context in which children are invited to participate.

1 - 7 of 7
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