lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alvunger, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Sundberg, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers Matter - But How?: Introduction2017In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this special issue, we start from a general policy assumption about teachers and teachingparticularly clearly summarized in the 2005 report Teachers Matter: Attracting, Developingand Retaining Effective Teachers by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation andDevelopment (OECD). The report states that teacher policy is high on national agendas andthat teachers are ‘the most significant resource in schools’ for improving efficiency and equityin school. Thus, the policy report states school improvement largely depends on ‘ensuringthat competent people want to work as teachers, that their teaching is of high quality, andthat all students have access to high quality teaching’ (OECD, 2005, p. 7). Against a backgroundof an increasingly centralized transnational and national governance of school,emphasizing international comparisons (Dale & Robertson, 2009; Lawn & Grek, 2012; Meyer& Benavot, 2013; Nordin & Sundberg, 2014; Rizvi & Lingard, 2010) and a curriculum characterizedby performativity and educational effectiveness (Ball, 2003; Kelly, 2009), we are interestedin teachers’ significance and conditions for teacher agency. However, we regard thepolicy field mainly as the background, from which we retain the fundamental claim that‘teachers matter’. In contrast to policy documents, the intention in this special issue is toexplore in what different ways, at what different times and in what different spaces teacherstruly matter, without having any answers in advance – that is, outside the area of policyhighroads but still against a backdrop of a policy of accountability and standards.

  • 2.
    Nordin, Andreas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Sundberg, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Exploring Curriculum Change Using Discursive Institutionalism: A Conceptual Framework2018In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 820-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims to explore to what extent and in what ways discourseinstitutionalism can contribute to the understanding and analysis ofcurriculum change in a globalized context. By focusing specifically oncurriculum change, this article proposes how discourse institutionalismcan contribute to the so-called ‘crisis of curriculum theory’ by addressing(i) the non-linearity of change, (ii) the process of the translation of ideasand (iii) actor agency. The text is structured in three sections. In the firstsection, we elaborate on the notion of curriculum change as a vitalconcept for the field of curriculum theory in a globalized context, focusingon processes of recontextualization and the translation of curriculumcontent. In the second, we elaborate on discourse institutionalism as acontributing approach to the analysis of such processes of curriculumchange, constructing a conceptual framework. In the third and finalsection, we give some examples of how the conceptual framework canbe used in analysing curriculum change, using the 2011 Swedish curriculumreform (Lgr 11) as an empirical reference, and the result showsthat the conceptual framework offers a wide repertoire of possibleapproaches to analysing curriculum change, both vertically andhorizontally.

  • 3.
    Sundström Sjödin, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Enacted realities in teachers’ experiences: bringing materialism into pragmatism2017In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 96-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we explore factors that constitute ‘the social’ for theteacher Susan, which at the same time highlights ethical aspects ofthe exercise of her profession. We meet her in a situation where she issetting grades, and our interest focuses on the relations that becomeof concern for her in her professional task to give the students theirgrades. In this exploration, we recognize the renewal of interest inrealism and examine the possible links that can be drawn betweentransactional realism, as a pragmatic view, and the new materialism,here represented by actor–network theory. Building on a narrativefrom an interview with a named teacher in a daily newspaper, theempirical study focuses on actors constituting Susan’s reality whengrading. Our argument is that in order to understand the complexlevels of aspects that influence teachers’ actions, it is necessary tostart from the local and from there trace the human and materialfactors that may affect teachers’ room for action. Bringing materialaspects into the consideration of Susan’s situation helps us see thattechnology itself changes time and spaces and moves the action ofgrading into spaces outside her professional sphere.

  • 4.
    Tahirsylaj, Armend
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Teacher autonomy and responsibility variation and association with student performance in Didaktik and curriculum traditions2019In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 162-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary objective of the study was to empirically test theoretical claims made about differences between Didaktik and curriculum traditions concerning teacher autonomy (TA) and teacher responsibility (TR). It tests the hypothesis that TA and TR are higher among Didaktik than curriculum countries. The second objective was to explore associations of TA and responsibility measures with students’ science performance? Nationally representative data from 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), collected through a two-step random selection process were used. For TA individual items Mann–Whitney rank-sum test was employed, while a difference of proportion test was used for TR items to examine the differences. Hierarchical linear modelling (HLM) was used to examine association of TA and TR items with students’ science performance in PISA 2009. Overall and contrary to the initial hypothesis, teachers in curriculum countries enjoy both more autonomy and responsibility than teachers in Didaktik countries, but differences were substantively weak. Furthermore, within-country associations of autonomy and responsibility measures with students’ science performance were found in a few countries. Further research is recommended to address TA and responsibility and complexities that accompany them in current stakeholder-crowded school contexts.

  • 5.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Örebro universitet.
    Learning to communicate or communicating to learn?: A conceptual discussion on communnication, meaning, and knowledge2010In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 431-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the conditions for students’ prospects of acquiring knowledge in school often are thought of as something that must be improved in the political rhetoric, it is also urgent, as Michael F. D. Young has argued, to ask what kind of knowledge should be the basis of the curriculum and to recognize the question of knowledge as central to the curricular debate. This article examines the grounds for a relational and communicative understanding of education. Drawing on John Dewey’s reconstruction of the concept of experience and Donald Davidson’s meaning theory in terms of three varieties of knowledge, the emphasis is on an intersubjective conceptualization of meaning and knowledge and its implications. Central themesin the analysis are communication as a condition for the acquisition of knowledge; a shared, but not identical, world as a point of reference; and an approach to specialized knowledge as judgement formation. As a conclusion it is argued that one condition for acquisition of knowledge, in terms of meaning, is to participate in and be influenced by conversations with a shared purpose, within and between different groups.

  • 6.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    When transnational curriculum policy reaches classrooms - teaching as directed exploration2018In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 654-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore how education policy that is both enabled and constrained by transnational policy flows and national policy built up by social, cultural and historical traditions are enacted through curriculum at the classroom level. The focus is on how policy rationality embedded in the structure and content of curriculum is transformed into certain rationalities in classroom teaching. By understanding lessons as curriculum events', the study reveals a dominant classroom discourse of recitation and similar triadic communication patterns, which is in accordance with other classroom studies. However, in the article it is argued that the version of teaching that emerges in this study, interpreted in a broader context of an international standards movement, can be understood in terms of directed exploration based on the teacher's role as an explorer of what the students know, think and understand in relation to the acquisition of knowledge prescribed in the curriculum's knowledge requirements. Even though the form of recitation is well known, the reason for choosing this teaching repertoire is somewhat new and can be related to the teacher authoring a basic oral text in accordance with assessment standards.

  • 7.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Where is ‘the political’ in curriculum research?2018In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 711-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an overview in connection with the 50th anniversary of the Journal ofCurriculum Studies (JCS), this article begins with John Dewey’s notion thatall educational actions carry philosophical implications. The tensionbetween different education-research philosophies, between non-socialand social education philosophies in Dewey’s terms, becomes visible inan overview of articles published during the past 50 years of the JCS.Therefore, the purpose here is to explore in what different forms and inwhat different spaces the political takes shape in curriculum research.Policies on education always address fundamental political questions inthe sense that debates on education inevitably include alternative viewsof good education and good society. Instead of looking for the political,it seems to be more fruitful to look for different ways of expressing thepolitical. This, in turn, might contribute to a more nuanced debate onwhich political perspectives will be most productive in developing thecurriculum research field. Three views on ‘the political’ are identified. Thefirst is a personal, ‘over-socialized’ view based on personal experiences,the second is a ‘social’ view that focuses on social interactions andsocietal implications, and the third is an impersonal, ‘under-socialized’view based on ‘science’.

  • 8.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Alvunger, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Wermke, Wieland
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Living in an era of comparisons: comparative research on policy, curriculum and teaching2018In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 587-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The articles in this special issue include different perspectives on comparativepolicy studies with an aim to understand transnational educationpolicies in relation to the logic of national educational systems andto grasp the ongoing reframing of teacher identity and teaching as aresult of the policy activities of ‘new’ and coordinated internationalactors. This special issue aims to contribute to a continued qualifiedinvestigation in curriculum issues at the various levels within the publiceducation system, as well as in the international policy movements,affecting public education differently in different nations. A ‘comparativecurriculum research’ inspired by theories and methods from comparativeeducation might be helpful in this endeavour.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf