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  • 1.
    Ackesjö, Helena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Nordänger, Ulla Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    “Betwixt and Between”: Leisure-time Teachers and the Construction of Professional Identities2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 884-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2014, a newly formed group of teachers graduated from Swedish universities. In addition to their qualification as leisure-time pedagogues, their degree includes teaching practical/aesthetical subjects in compulsory school. This group of teachers thus has to relate to dual professional identities and to maintain a balance between the socially oriented leisure-time centres and a goal- and results-driven school. In this article we describe their first two years after graduation, trying to get hold of their negotiation of professional identities and orientation in the professional landscape. Results shows that the graduates try to balance own ideals and hybrid professional intentions against traditional professional identities and labour market conditions and that position in a liminal phase might be crucial for the outcome.

  • 2.
    Agevall, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. Kristianstad University.
    Pernilla, Broberg
    Kristianstad University ; Linköping University.
    Umans, Timurs
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Management Accounting and Logistics. Kristianstad University.
    The new generation of auditors meeting praxis: dual learning's role in audit students' professional development2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 307-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether and in what way “dual learning” can develop understanding of the relationship between structure/judgement and explores audit student’s perceptions of the audit profession. The Work Integrated Learning (WIL) module, serving as a tool of enabling dual learning, represents the context for this exploration. The study is based on a focus group and individual interviews conducted with students performing their WIL. Our data and its analysis indicates that when in a WIL context, students develop awareness of the use of standards and checklists on the one hand, and the importance of discretional judgement on the other. Based on these results, we theorise as to how dual learning manifests itself in students’ experiences and understanding of the relationship between structure and judgement.

  • 3.
    Andersson, C.
    et al.
    Swedish Social Insurance Inspectorate.
    Antelius, J.
    Swedish National Audit Office.
    Månsson, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Sund, K.
    Stockholm University.
    Technical efficiency and productivity for higher education institutions in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 205-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates technical efficiency and productivity for Swedish higher education institutions (HEIs). One identified problem in previous research concerns adjusting efficiency scores for input quality. This problem is avoided using grades from upper-secondary schools. A second problem concerns heterogeneity with respect to subjects and institutions between HEIs. Using the Swedish national resource allocation system, students are weighted according to subject. For research production, a bibliometric index that allows for differences in publication tradition is used. A third problem when using the data envelopment analysis approach is the lack of statistical inference. Bootstrapping is used to approach this problem. The results indicate an average inefficiency of 12% and a productivity increase of around 1.7% per year.

  • 4.
    Danielsson, Kristina
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för nordiska språk.
    The impact of high versus low linguistic levels in Swedish beginning readers’ oral reading of running texts2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 427-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of high (e.g. syntax and semantics) and low (graphemes) linguistic levels in 50 beginners' oral reading of running texts is explored, by means of a qualitative analysis of reading errors collected in a longitudinal study. The hypothesis, based on previous quantitative results from the same data, was that the graphemic and/or lexical levels could explain some of the reading errors, but that, for example, syntactic complexity or unexptected contexts could explain others. Unfamiliar words and words with compex graphemic structures did result in many reading errors. but a relatively large number of errors seem to be caused by, for example, syntactical or contextual constraints. In the longitudinal perspective, the readers tended to advance through various phases regarding their utilisation of higher linguistic levels, revealing a possible transition from a concentration mainly on the graphemic level via a dependency on and finally a sensitivity to context.

  • 5.
    Danielsson, Kristina
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för nordiska språk.
    The relationship between grapheme–phoneme correspondences and reading errors in Swedish beginners’ oral reading2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 511-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores the relationship between error frequencies and correspondences between graphemes and phonemes of words in running texts read by 50 Swedish beginning readers. Following the ample cross-linguistic evidence of the impact of orthographic transparency, transparent words could be expected to be decoded more accurately than opaque words. Thus, error frequencies on words with different degrees of complexity in their grapheme- phoneme correspondences were compared in the study. The results reveal that error frequencies can only partly be explained by the degree of word transparency. Instead, contextual factors also seem to be relevant, something which previous studies by the author have indicated.

  • 6.
    Doumas, Kyriaki
    Lund University , Sweden.
    Students’ experiences and perceptions of in-depth approaches in teaching and understanding subject matter2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 295-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students' experiences and perceptions of good teaching and understanding in literature and physics during one school year were investigated through in-depth interviews with students in eight Greek high school classes in the first, second and third grade. The pedagogical quality of in-depth teaching and understanding of subject matter, as described by the students, was investigated. Students' feelings of joy, pleasure and personal meaning in the teaching and learning situation were also in focus in the research. The investigation brought out three main types of approaches to subject matter in classroom teaching and learning: a logical/analytical approach, a holistic/reflective approach and an existential approach. These three approaches were common to teaching and understanding of literature and physics, with some variation in specific meaning within and between subjects. They also varied in presence and meaning between grades and students.

  • 7.
    Gerrevall, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Making Sure It’s the Right One: Induction Programme as a Gatekeeper to the Teaching Profession2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 631-648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induction programmes including assessments of suitability were introduced in Sweden 2011 and were in use for three years. The purpose of this study is to examine the conditions for and the consequences of giving the induction programme a gatekeeper function to the teaching profession. The empirical basis consists of a web-based survey, which involves approximately 100 school principals and preschool heads. The study shows that the conditions for a fair assessment of suitability were not established. The assessment task was complex; those responsible for the assessments were not sufficiently prepared. The induction employments varied in coherence and in demands. The results support bringing the gatekeeper-function back into teacher education and focusing the induction programme on support and development. 

  • 8.
    Hallsén, Stina
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Nordin, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Variations on Modernisation: Technological Development and Internationalisation in Local Swedish School Policy From 1950 to 20002018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since WWII, Sweden has had an international reputation for being modernand progressive, with schooling that provides equal opportunities for allchildren. Analysing local enactment of the national pursuit ofmodernisation in two contrasting municipalities, this paper offers newperspectives on Swedish education history beyond the image ofschooling as a uniform national project. The concepts of technologicaldevelopment and internationalisation are applied to capture the ideasand visions inherent in this modernisation. The study demonstrates,through the example of the rural municipality of Tierp and themunicipality of Stockholm, the complexity of the modernisation processand the interplay between divergent interpretations of national reformsand local enactment of modernisation.

  • 9.
    Hegender, Henrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    The assessment of student teachers' academic and professional knowledge in school-based teacher education2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 151-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to scrutinize the assessment of teacher knowledge in a school‐based course at one Swedish pre‐service teacher education program. In a general education school‐based course, teacher educators visited the student teachers at their school placements and met them and their school mentors in student‐teaching conferences to assess their teacher knowledge. The findings primarily show that the assessment procedures are influenced by teacher educators’ organization of the school visits and conferences. Secondly, the organization of the school visits and conferences influences who the potential and actual assessors at the conferences can be and are. Thirdly, the assessed student teacher knowledge at the conferences is described as procedural knowledge in a knowledge‐in‐practice perspective, almost exclusively in the area of relational, emotional, and caring learning objectives and aspects of teaching activities. Fourthly, the findings show that propositional knowledge in a knowledge‐for‐practice perspective is hardly mentioned or assessed.

  • 10.
    Lindberg, Leif
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Riis, Ulla
    Silander, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Gender Equality in Swedish Higher Education: Patterns and Shifts2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 165-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most European countries, more women than men attend undergraduate Higher Education (HE) and more women than men obtain degrees. In Sweden the proportion of female students has long been in the vicinity of 51-60%. The number of doctoral entrants and degrees meet a obalanced gender criterion,o defined as no sex constituting more than 60% of the population. Still the unequal gender structure of higher positions persists: men tend to hold the top positions, especially as professors. Explaining this inertia is the main theme of this article. Differences between horizontal and vertical analyses are focused on, and changes due to gender balance during 1999-2007 are shown. Variations in career patterns over research areas are highlighted. Finally, hypotheses are formulated and approaches for further studies on gender balance in HE are discussed.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalens högskola.
    The nature and role of common ground in the learning of mathematics in small-group discussions2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 609-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the nature and role of common ground in group learning of mathematics by means of the analytical constructs of focal projects and contextualization. The analysis investigates two students (12–13 years old) playing a dice game, where their task is to distribute a set of markers based on the total of two dice. The analysis shows how consistency between the students' focal projects became crucial in their progression from a uniform to a non-uniform distribution of the markers used in the game. The task system and concrete manipulatives became important in furthering the students' explorations. In the frame of a frequency context, we also discuss how a contextualization may restrict certain aspects of probability from coming into play during such explorations.

  • 12.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Markström, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University.
    Co-producing Children's Sociality in Parent-Teacher Conferences2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 546-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe how parents and preschool teachers talk about children's interactional skills in parent–teacher conferences in the Swedish preschool and how this can be related to socialization processes. The analyses show that children's communicative skills, such as turn-taking in conversation and co-operation, are considered as important for both parents and teachers and talked about in terms of trouble or success. Children's skills are often assessed by using chronological age as a parameter. Our analysis suggests that the talk about children's interactional skills may be interpreted in terms of deficiency discourses founded primarily on theories in developmental psychology, and that parents, and particularly the teachers, present themselves as socializing agents with regard to children.

  • 13.
    Prøitz, Tine
    et al.
    Univ South Eastern Norway Borre, Norway.
    Nordin, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Learning Outcomes in Scandinavian Education through the Lens of Elliot Eisner2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discursively learning outcomes have been embedded within an education-policy context characterised by a shift from teaching to learning. In the dominant education policy discourse, learning outcomes have come to play an important role in education whose emphasis is more on product than process, which by its critics have been characterised as is criticised as scientific management. Calls have been made to reconsider alternative interpretations of learningoutcomes and a renewal of older perspectives on learning outcomes such as in Eisner's works. The article examines the concept of learning outcomes, as interpreted in education policy, and discusses it within Eisner's framing of teaching and learning. Analysing policy developments and the introduction oflearning outcomes in two Scandinavian countries, we ask what is taken for granted in the interpretation of learning outcomes. The analysis contributes to a widened narrative on what education could be about by illuminating alternative ways of interpreting and conceptualising learning outcomes in education.

  • 14.
    Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Larsson, Maria
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Nilsson, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Analyzing content and participation in classroom discourse: Dimensions of variation, mediating tools, and conceptual accountability2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 101-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balancing content and students’ participation in the mathematics classroom is an area of both practical and theoretical interest. In this article we relate and contribute to these two interests by analyzing classroom data from an intervention project aiming at teaching mathematics through problem solving. The study shows that several aspects such as mediating tools, the teacher’s conceptual accountability and interactional moves play important roles in the nature of the co-construction of critical dimensions of variation. We therefore suggest that an analysis of content and participation in the mathematics classroom would benefit from drawing on several theoretical sources. As such, the study could be seen as a contribution to recent elaborations on developing variation theory for analyzing the enacted object of learning. 

  • 15.
    Schenker, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Teaching Physical Activity — a Matter of Health and Equality?2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to understand the mechanisms supporting equality and social health in physical activity (PA) practices by analysing didactic choices. Social health is understood as equal distribution of power. Thereby, a healthy PA practice needs to be inclusive. 3 PA activities are analysed as cases. Issues of inclusion and exclusion are scrutinized. The analysis shows how the power in PA classes may be reallocated by didactic choices and tools such as the teaching content, the rules, the organization, and the leader attitude. Additionally, to increase the possibilities of conducting healthy PA teaching in physical education and health (PEH), humane values need to take precedence before the competitive sport logic governed by a scientific paradigm.

  • 16.
    Selart, Marcus
    et al.
    School of Economics and Business Administration, Norway.
    Nordström, Thomas
    Växjö University, Sweden.
    Kuuvas, Bård
    Norwegian School of Management, Norway.
    Takemura, Kazuhisa
    Waseda University, Japan..
    Effects of Reward on Self-regulation, Intrinsic Motivation and Creativity2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 439-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article evaluates the effects of two types of rewards (performance-contingent versus engagement-contingent) on self-regulation, intrinsic motivation and creativity. Forty-two undergraduate students were randomly assigned to three conditions; i.e. a performance-contingent reward group, an engagement-contingent reward group and a control group. Results provide little support for the negative effects of performance rewards on motivational components. However, they do indicate that participants in the engagement-contingent reward group and the control group achieved higher rated creativity than participants in the performance-contingent reward group. Alternative explanations for this finding are discussed.

    Keywords: Rewards; Self-Regulation; Creativity; Intrinsic Motivation

  • 17.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Cosmopolitanism as communication?: On conditions for educational conversations in a globalized society2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 32-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I explore the question of how a cosmopolitan perspective on education could be understood from curriculum-based activities in classrooms. Assuming that there is a cosmopolitan potential in curriculum content as such, I draw on David Hansen, Anthony Kwame Appiah and Donald Davidson to argue that cosmopolitanism at the classroom level needs to be understood from both a moral and a communicative perspective. In this article the focus is on the latter. A communicative understanding of cosmopolitanism emphasizes the relational stance to the other and to the social and physical world.  The conditions for cosmopolitan dialogues are understood in the curriculum as shared environment, cosmopolitan curiosity and reciprocal communicative respect based on the recognition on responsibilities towards others in a shared world. The characteristic of cosmopolitan conversation is its potentiality.   

1 - 17 of 17
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