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  • 1.
    Bergh Nestlog, Ewa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Ehriander, Helene
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    The Book Dog and Semiotic Resources in Envisionment Building of a Text World2019In: Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, ISSN 0090-6905, E-ISSN 1573-6555, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 535-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Linnaeus University project “The Book Dog and Astrid Lindgren” seeks to bring children and literature together and to use the dog as a tool for this. The method involves children reading aloud to trained dogs, called book dogs. By studying the practice of the book dog, we seek more profound knowledge of the importance of the reading practice for children’s reading. Such knowledge can have didactic implications for reading practices also in contexts where there is no book dog. In the study reception theories (Langer in Envisioning knowledge.Building literacy in the academic disciplines, New York, Teachers College Press,2011a; Langer in Envisioning literature. Literary understanding and literature instruction, 2nd ed., New York, Teachers College Press,2011b) are developed with perspectives of discourse analysis (Fairclough in Discourse and social change, Polity Press, Cambridge,1992). and social semiotics (Halliday in Language as social semiotics. The social interpretation of language and meaning, Edward Arnold, London,1978). The result shows that the dog contributes with semiotic resources in the meaning-making process; the text world comes to life for the child through the expanded envisionment building where the dog is central. Since pupils read texts in all school subjects, the study should be relevant for all types of teachers when shaping reading practices that support pupil’s meaning-making, also in contexts where there is no book dog. The study can also say something about what engagement, attentiveness, and non-judgemental attitudes can mean for pupils, even they in reading and writing difficulties (Bergh Nestlog and Ehriander 2016).

  • 2.
    Heinat, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Klingvall, Eva
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Anaphoric Reference to Quantified Expressions in Swedish2019In: Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, ISSN 0090-6905, E-ISSN 1573-6555, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 551-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results from two studies on anaphoric reference to quantifying expressions (QEs) in Swedish, contributing to the current cross-linguistic discussion on this issue. For English it has been shown that the polarity of the QE (positive vs negative) determines the anaphoric set reference (to the referens set, REFSET, or to the complement set, COMPSET), while for Spanish it has been claimed that while REFSET interpretation is the default, the relative sizes of the two sets (REFSET and COMPSET) also matters. In Experiment 1, a semantic plausibility study. The results showed that for positive QEs, anaphoric reference can only be to the REFSET, while for negative QEs, it can only be to the COMPSET. Unlike in English and Spanish, REFSET continuations were categorically ruled out for negative QEs. To investigate whether the internal differences between QEs could be explained in terms of set size, we conducted Experiment 2, an estimation task. The results from this experiment showed that the size of the REFSET relative to the COMPSET was not a determining factor.

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