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  • 1.
    Berner, Jessica
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Jogreus, Claes
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Distribution of personality, individual characteristics and internet usage in Swedish older adults2012In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 119-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This article investigated factors associated with internet usage in the Swedish older adults ranging in age from 60 to 96. Personality traits and individual characteristics have been previously noted to influence internet usage, where older adults have not been the focus population. In this study, the relationships between personality, individual characteristics and internet usage were investigated. Methods: A descriptive analysis of the personality tests of a total of 1402 subjects included in the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care was conducted. Three variables were controlled for: sex, age and education. Descriptive statistics, Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests, chi-square tests and a logistic regression were used in order to detect the relationships with internet usage. Results: Men differ significantly from women in the personality traits analysis. Those with higher education were more open and neuroticism was lower in the oldest older adults. Internet usage declined significantly with age and those with middle to higher education were using the internet the most. No other associations with internet use were found. Conclusion: Personality traits and individual characteristics do not seem to influence the Swedish older adult and their internet usage. What one needs to account for is the age and education of the person. The more educated and the youngest cohorts were using the internet more frequently.

  • 2.
    Bratt, Anna S.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Blekinge County Council.
    Self-compassion in old age: confirmatory factor analysis of the 6-factor model and the internal consistency of the Self-compassion scale-short form2019In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Self-compassion is a psychological construct associated with self-acceptance and coping with the aging process. The Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), in both long and short forms, is the most widely used measure of self-compassion. Studies on the psychometric properties of the short form (SCS-SF) are scarce. The aim of this study was to translate into Swedish and test the psychometric properties of the SCS-SF. Another aim was to investigate whether self-compassion differs by age and gender in older adults.

    Method: We tested the Swedish SCS-SF in a sample of 594 randomly selected older adults, aged 66 to 102 years, for internal consistency, construct validity, and factor structure.

    Results: The results showed the SCS-SF had acceptable internal consistency in the total sample (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.68) and somewhat higher (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.76) in the youngest old (age 66 years). The six-factor structure found in the original study was not observed in confirmatory factor analyses in our older sample. Exploratory factor analyses showed that a two-factor solution, formed by the positive and negative components had the best fit; however, only the negative component had good internal consistency.

    Conclusion: Overall, the SCS-SF seemed to have insufficient reliability in this sample of older adults and further studies are needed to see whether new instruments are needed for this population. Self-compassion was generally higher in men than women, but did not differ by age in this sample of older adults.

  • 3.
    Bratt, Anna S.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenström, Ulf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Effects on life satisfaction of older adults after child and spouse bereavement2017In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 602-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have compared the impact of different familial losses on life satisfaction (LS). Furthermore, there is a lack of research on the effect of having lost both a child and a spouse among older adults. Sample: A random sample of 1402 individuals, 817 women and 585 men, aged 60–96 years from the Blekinge part of the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care (SNAC-B) participated in this cross-sectional study. Aims: The first aim was to compare the effects of child or spouse or both child and spouse bereavement on LS and, the second aim, to investigate if there were gender differences within the bereaved groups. Results: The results showed that having lost a child, spouse or both child and spouse had a negative association with LS, although this effect was small. Having experienced multiple losses did not predict more variance than a single child or spouse loss. Gender differences were found within all the bereaved groups with bereaved men having lower LS than bereaved women. Longer time since the loss was associated with higher LS. Conclusions: Bereaved older adults have somewhat lower LS than non-bereaved and bereaved men seem more affected than bereaved women. Future research needs to address older men´s experiences after the loss of a loved one.

  • 4.
    Bratt, Anna S.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenström, Ulf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Role of Neuroticism and Conscientiousness on Mortality Risk in Older Adults After Child and Spouse Bereavement2016In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 559-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Bereavement effects on mortality risk were investigated in 1150 randomly selected participants, aged 60-104, in the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care.

    Method: Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for age, gender, functional ability, the personality traits neuroticism and conscientiousness as well as time since the latest loss were used to predict mortality risk.

    Results: Having lost a child, spouse or both child and spouse did not predict mortality risk. An indirect link between bereavement and mortality was found showing for each year since loss the mortality risk decreased by about 1%. Neuroticism, but not conscientiousness, was associated with mortality risk, with a small-effect size.

    Conclusions: The different bereavements did not predict mortality risk while an indirect link was found showing that mortality risk decreased with time.

  • 5.
    Djukanovic, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sorjonen, Kimmo
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Peterson, Ulla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Association between depressive symptoms and age, sex, loneliness and treatment among older people in Sweden2015In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 560-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of and the association between depressive symptoms and loneliness in relation to age and sex among older people (65–80 years) and to investigate to what extent those who report depressive symptoms had visited a health care professional and/or used antidepressant medication.

    Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a Swedish sample randomized from the total population in the age group 65–80 years (n = 6659). Chi square tests and logistic regression analyses were conducted.

    Results: The data showed that 9.8% (n = 653) reported depressive symptoms and 27.5% reported feelings of loneliness. More men than women reported depressive symptoms, and the largest proportion was found among men in the age group 75–80 years. An association between the odds to have a depressive disorder and loneliness was found which, however, decreased with increasing age. Of those with depressive symptoms a low proportion had visited a psychologist (2.9%) or a welfare officer (4.2%), and one in four reported that they use antidepressant medication. Of those who reported depressive symptoms, 29% considered that they had needed medical care during the last three months but had refrained from seeking, and the most common reason for that was negative experience from previous visits.

    Conclusion: Contrary to findings in most of the studies, depressive symptoms were not more prevalent among women. The result highlights the importance of detecting depressive symptoms and loneliness in older people and to offer adequate treatment in order to increase their well-being.

  • 6.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Hellström, Amanda
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Sleep complaints and their association with comorbidity and health-related quality of life in anolder population in Sweden2011In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 204-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The relationship between sleep complaints, comorbidity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in advanced age has not been clearly established. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the presence of sleep complaints and discuss their association with morbidity and the HRQoL among the people aged 60 years and above.

    Methods: Data regarding demography, sleep, comorbidity and HRQoL were collected through questionnaires and interviews among 1128 people in Sweden. The Johns Hopkins adjusted clinical groups (ACG®) Case-Mix System 6.0 and the Short-Form Health Survey-12 were used to assess morbidity and HRQoL, respectively.

    Results: There was a divergence in the number of sleep complaints between those with no morbidity and those who had a high degree of comorbidity. Most of the sleep complaints related to low HRQoL were found among those with a high degree of comorbidity.

    Conclusions: People with a high degree of comorbidity appear to be a group with a high risk of having both sleep complaints and a low HRQoL. Thus, this study suggests that even if sleep complaints appear to be difficult to identify and treat successfully, it is important to pay particular attention to those people who suffer from a high degree of comorbidity if their HRQoL is to be maintained.

  • 7.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Halling, Anders
    Landstinget Blekinge.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Relationships between physical activity and perceived qualities of life in old age. Results of the SNAC-study2009In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, ISSN 1360-7863, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: the aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships of different types Quality of life to strenuous and light physical activity in old age. Methods: The Swedish SNAC-Blekinge baseline database, consisting of data on 585 men and 817 women 60 to 96 years of age, was utilized. The independent variables were light and strenuous physical activity. Four dependent variables concerned with various quality of life components were employed (well-being, engagement, emotional support and social anchorage). Age, gender, functional ability and co-morbidity were included as possible confounders. Non-parametric bivariate and multivariate statistical tests were performed. Results: Correlations suggested there to generally be a positive relationship between physical activity and quality of life. Multivariate logistic regression analyses controlling for possible confounders showed light physical activity to increase the odds of experiencing well-being, engagement and social anchorage, whereas strenuous physical activity increased the odds of experiencing engagement and emotional support. Thus, light physical activity and strenuous physical activity differed in their relation to quality of life generally. Conclusions: The results indicate that physical activity has a salutogenic effect by enhancing the quality of life and it can be assumed to be connected to quality of life by generating pleasure and relaxation.

  • 8.
    Tuvesson, Hanna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Hellström, Amanda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sjöberg, L.
    Karolinska Institutet;Stockholm University.
    Sjölund, Britt-Marie
    University of Gävle;Karolinska Institutet;Stockholm University.
    Nordell, E.
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Blekinge County Hospital.
    Life weariness and suicidal thoughts in late life: a national study in Sweden2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1365-1371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the point prevalence of life weariness and suicidal thoughts and their relationship with socio-demographic characteristics in a population of older adults in Sweden. Method: Data from 7913 individuals aged 60 years and older were drawn from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, a collaborative study in Sweden. Life weariness and suicidal thoughts were measured by one item derived from the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. A multinomial regression model was used to investigate the relationships of socio-demographic characteristics with life weariness and suicidal thoughts. Results: Living in urban and semi-urban areas, being of advanced age, being divorced and having lower educational levels were related to life weariness. Living in a residential care facility, being widowed or unmarried, being born in a non-Nordic European country and experiencing financial difficulties were related to both life weariness and suicidal thoughts. Sex was found to be unrelated to either life weariness or suicidal thoughts. Conclusion: This study found that several socio-demographic variables were associated with life weariness and suicidal thoughts among older adults. Specific attention to older individuals with these characteristics may be warranted as they might be more vulnerable to life weariness and suicidal thoughts.

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