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  • 1.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway).
    Your favourite manager is an organisational disaster.2009In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 5-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – When subordinates are asked what kind of manager they prefer, the answers are virtually the same. Subordinates have a different focus than managers, as the latter focus on organisational goal attainment. The purpose of this paper is to pinpoint the consequences of the subordinates' leadership preferences for organisational performance.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper draws conclusions based on previous research and empirical data collected to illustrate the likely outcome of subordinates having the managers they prefer.

    Findings – Subordinates favour the type of manager who has a relationship oriented style of leadership, and who is predominantly motivated by affiliation. Additionally, subordinates appear to prefer a servant leader to be their boss. Research has shown that relationship oriented and affiliation motivated managers, as well as servant leaders are detrimental to organisational effectiveness.

    Research limitations/implications – The data refer only to Swedish samples of private and public managers regarding leadership styles and motivation profiles. Data have not yet been published on the occurrence of popular managers and the prevalence of servant leaders.

    Practical implications – Both managers and subordinates need to acknowledge the conflicting issues in management. The manager that the subordinates want is precisely what they should not get.

    Originality/value – This paper supplies theoretical as well as empirical arguments needed to warn organisations against having managers whose behaviour is preferred by subordinates, but also impedes organisational effectiveness.

  • 2.
    Billore, Soniya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Billore, Gautam
    IMED, India.
    Internationalization of SMEs and market orientation: a study of customer knowledge, networks and cultural knowledge2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to study the context of market orientation and the importance of customer knowledge, networking and cultural knowledge as components that contribute to market orientation and subsequently impact the internationalization of firms. The paper extends current understanding of market orientation through a study in the context of developing economies.

  • 3. Brandão, Amelia
    et al.
    Sousa, José
    Rodrigues, Clarinda
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    A Dynamic Approach to Brand Portfolio Audit and Brand Architecture Strategy2020In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 32, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hilmersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Halmstad University.
    Sandberg, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Pourmand Hilmersson, Firouze
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Political knowledge, political turbulence and uncertainty in the internationalization process of SMEs.2015In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 234-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of the study is to examine the political sources of uncertainty in the internationalization process of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    Design/methodology/approach– The authors theoretically derived a research model embracing three hypotheses. These hypotheses are tested on a sample of 203 on-site interviewed SMEs. Regression analysis is used to test two individual hypotheses and one interaction effect.

    Findings– The regression analysis reveals that political knowledge possessed by the firm reduces uncertainty in the internationalization process. Political turbulence is shown to increase uncertainty in the internationalization. The interaction shows that political turbulence obliterates the uncertainty reducing effect by political knowledge.

    Research limitations/implications– The authors identifies two main political sources of uncertainty in the internationalization process of SMEs. For managers and business researchers, it is shown that experiential knowledge is useful under stable conditions. When turbulence increases, however, firms need to develop alternative strategies for uncertainty management.

    Originality/value– This study is the first to test the uncertainty reducing effects of experiential knowledge in turbulent environments. Thus, by running the interaction between political knowledge and political turbulence, the authors shed new light on the usefulness of previous experiences in the internationalization process.

  • 5.
    Hultén, Bertil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Sensory Marketing: the Multi-Sensory-Brand Experience Concept2011In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 256-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the multi-sensory brand-experience concept in relation to the human mind and senses. It also seeks to propose a sensory marketing (SM) model of the multi-sensory brand-experience hypothesis.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper applies exploratory and explanatory approaches to investigating the multi-sensory brand-experience concept within the context of discovery. The qualitative study is built on primary and secondary data sources, including personal interviews with experts and managers.

    Findings – The multi-sensory brand-experience hypothesis suggests that firms should apply sensorial strategies and three explanatory levels within an SM model. It allows firms through means as sensors, sensations, and sensory expressions to differentiate and position a brand in the human mind as image.

    Research limitations/implications – A theoretical implication is that the multi-sensory brand-experience hypothesis emphasizes the significance of the human mind and senses in value-generating processes. Another theoretical implication is that the hypothesis illustrates the shortcomings of the transaction and relationship marketing models in considering the multi-sensory brand-experience concept. It is worth conducting additional research on the multi-sensory interplay between the human senses in value-generating processes.

    Practical implications – The findings offer additional insights to managers on the multi-sensory brand-experience concept. This research opens up opportunities for managers to identify emotional/psychological linkages in differentiating, distinguishing and positioning a brand as an image in the human mind.

    Originality/value – The main contribution of this research lies in developing the multi-sensory brand-experience hypothesis within a SM model. It fills a major gap in the marketing literature and research in stressing the need to rethink conventional marketing models.

  • 6.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Avd för företagsekonomi.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    A dive into the depths of quality management2006In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to study the fundamentals of quality management, to examine the deeper layers of quality management and propose a tentative framework of its profound foundations. Design/methodology/approach - The paper is conceptual, reviewing the quality management literature and connecting it with contributions from service management, organisational consciousness studies and eastern philosophy. Findings - A model of quality management consisting of the levels of techniques, models and values has been the starting point. From this basis, an elaborated framework of the foundations of quality management, including different aspects of the values, functions and activity elements, has been developed. Originality/value - Current approaches to quality management might be too superficial, which could be the cause of many implementation failures. In this paper, a deeper understanding is sought. A novel framework has been proposed that can provide a basis for further research into the profound nature of quality management. Further, implications that should be useful for managers are discussed. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 7.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Customer perceptions of quality: a study in the SPA industry2016In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 657-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to explore dimensions of customer perceptions of factors important for a quality experience in the SPA industry and to assess service quality implications for these dimensions.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The empirical study involved seven Swedish SPA hotels. The first part was qualitative, consisting of seven focus-group interviews with hotel guests. In addition, service providers’ perceptions of customer quality were collected through seven quality cafés. The qualitative parts were analysed with the constant comparative technique from the grounded theory approach. Based on the findings from the interviews, a questionnaire was delivered to 400 randomly accessed women. The responses were analysed with exploratory factor analysis and cluster analysis.

    Findings

    The focus-group interviews showed that the customers’ perception of quality could be expressed in the following dimensions: physical effects, mental effects, pleasure and flexibility. The dimensions for customer quality seen from the staff’s perspective were treatments, climate and the SPA facility itself. The exploratory factor analysis defined the following underlying factors: enjoyment, treatments, practicality, fitness, cost and calm. The cluster analysis resulted in four groups of customer profiles: the more of everything group, the enjoyers, the savers and the fitness freaks.

    Research limitations/implications

    A limitation is that the study has only been carried out in one country. The main implication for research is a better understanding of quality dimensions and perceptions of service quality in the SPA industry.

    Practical implications

    The study provides a comprehensive insight into the dimensions of quality for SPA visitors. Moreover, four distinct groups of customers have been identified. This knowledge should be useful for SPA managers.

    Originality/value

    Only limited amounts of research have previously been carried out in the SPA industry. The paper provides a framework depicting perceptions of quality dimensions in SPA hotels.

  • 8.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Barriers to entry and market strategy: a literature review and a proposed model2009In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 64-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – To review previous research and to propose a model for the impact of barriers to entry on the market strategy of an entrant firm, where product/market scope and product differentiation are central strategy components. Questions: What is the impact of barriers on market strategies of entrants? Are early and late entrants affected in different ways?

    Design/methodology/approachA model and propositions are developed based on a review of previous research. The model applies the contingency perspective and company cases exemplify the model.

    Findings – It is proposed that a firm that enters a market late and faces extensive barriers would choose a broader product/market scope and differentiate its products to a larger extent than an early entrant. It is also proposed that incumbents’ market strategies indirectly affect the market strategy of an entrant firm as incumbents’ market strategies interact with barriers, and the effects are due to entry timing.

    Implications – The study contributes theoretically as it extends current knowledge of the impact of barriers to entry on strategy. Management of entrant firms are advised to strive for a fit between barriers and market strategy and consider the propositions.

    Originality/value – The model and the propositions concern barrier effects on two key components of the market strategy of an entrant firm: product/market scope and product differentiation. Another important value is that the model accounts for interactions between incumbent strategies and barriers to entry, and effects on the market strategy of an entrant firm.

  • 9.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Business relatedness in international diversification: Achievements, gaps, and propositions2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 197-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Business relatedness is important in international diversification because it enables a firm's transfer of resources to business units operating in foreign markets. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model based on a review of the major contributions of studies regarding the relatedness of subsidiaries, joint ventures or any other foreign unit. Design/methodology/approach The paper examines theory bases, the relatedness construct, data issues and the key achievements of previous studies. Drawing on organizational learning, transaction costs economics and industrial organization, a conceptual model and propositions are developed that intend to close important research gaps. Findings The model includes competitive strategy as a mediator of the effects of relatedness on foreign unit performance, type of foreign unit - that is, a wholly owned unit or joint venture - as a moderator; and competition barriers as a moderator. Research limitations/implications In future research, the propositions need to be transformed into testable hypotheses. It is recommended to treat relatedness as a multidimensional concept. Practical implications A firm is primarily advised to evaluate how its relatedness with foreign units enables knowledge transfer. A foreign cost leadership strategy benefits from product relatedness, while a differentiation strategy calls for resource relatedness. Originality/value The proposed model is unique as it includes an actionable component that mediates the effects of relatedness on international performance, i.e. competitive strategy, and concerns both wholly owned foreign units and international joint ventures.

  • 10.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Firm’s strategic orientation, market context, and performance: literature review and opportunities for international strategy research2016In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 378-404Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of relationships betweenentrepreneurial orientation (EO) and performance, and between market orientation (MO) andperformance in different market contexts that set boundaries for performance.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents a review of studies containing empiricalresearch incorporating EO, MO, market context and firm performance.

    Findings – Patterns regarding content of previous studies of the issue are outlined, and crucialresearch gaps are identified. These concern a lack of focus on relationships between EO/MO andperformance of foreign units.

    Research limitations/implications – First, further studies on international strategy need todevelop EO/MO components that are consistent with foreign units’ value-adding roles. Second, theimpact of dynamism originating from competitors in foreign markets needs attention. Third, directimpacts of market dynamism on performance of foreign units, and moderating roles of EO/MO need tobe studied.

    Practical implications – International competitiveness of the firm as a whole would benefit fromhigher performance of foreign units that may be achieved through aligning EO/MO with local marketcontexts.

    Originality/value – Meta-analyses show that it is difficult to establish universal direct relationshipbetween EO/MO and performance and that the importance of market context is underestimated. Thepaper provides opportunities for further studies that may clarify underlying contingency mechanisms.

  • 11.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Foreign subsidiaries’ competitive strategy: the impact of corporate support and local competition2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 606-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The study draws on the resource-based view and the contingency view of strategy. The purposeof this paper is to contribute to international strategy literature by extending the current understanding offoreign subsidiary’s competitive strategy in terms of cost leadership and product differentiation.

    Design/methodology/approach – Hypotheses concern associations between corporate supportbuilding on product and skills relatedness and subsidiary strategies. Also, it is hypothesized that strategiesare due to the type of local competitive intensity. The hypotheses were tested on wholly owned subsidiaries ofSwedish industrial firms in Germany, the UK and the USA.

    Findings – Product and skills relatedness between the subsidiary and the corporate core unit are positivelyassociated with the subsidiary’s emphasis on cost leadership. Also, a positive association was found betweenskills relatedness and product differentiation, and extensive competitive intensity strengthens therelationship.

    Research limitations/implications – The study specifies what business relatedness is needed for asubsidiary’s competitive strategy; skills relatedness is more important than product relatedness; thetype of local competitive intensity is important; corporate support and local strategy operatesimultaneously.

    Practical implications – Management is advised to implement a foreign subsidiary’s competitivestrategy by recognizing the mechanisms identified in this study.

    Originality/value – In a unique way, the study captures the role of corporate support of a foreignsubsidiary’s competitive strategy relying on business relatedness and the importance of aligning the strategywith competitive intensity.

  • 12.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    How does a foreign subsidiary’s differentiation strategy fit competitive dynamics and mandate?2016In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 690-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Drawing on the contingency perspective of strategy, the purpose of this paper is to extendcurrent understanding of fit between a differentiation strategy of the industrial firm’s foreignsubsidiary and key contextual boundaries.

    Design/methodology/approach – A conceptual framework is developed in which a differentiationstrategy involves the complementary approaches of innovativeness and customer responsiveness. The key boundaries consist of local competitive dynamics and the value-adding mandate assigned to thesubsidiary. Detailed features of four types of differentiation strategies are identified by analysingstrategies applied by subsidiaries of industrial firms operating on the US market.

    Findings – Four propositions are developed regarding alignment between strategy types and theboundaries. Relationships are proposed regarding a strategy type and a context specified by rivalry/relational competitive dynamics, and a broad/narrow value-adding mandate.

    Research limitations/implications – The conceptual framework and the propositions may betested by analysing statistical data on industrial firms’ subsidiaries operating in several host countries.

    Practical implications – To increase a foreign subsidiary’s contribution to the global competitiveness ofan industrial firm, an awareness of the boundaries to the subsidiary’s strategy of differentiation that mayhamper the subsidiary’s performance is essential.

    Originality/value – The conceptual framework, and the propositions, contributes to literature on theindustrial firm’s global strategy because it focuses on subsidiary strategy and extends presentunderstanding of the mechanisms that drive the effectiveness of a foreign subsidiary’s differentiation strategy.

  • 13.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Product/customer scope: Competition antecedents, performance effects, and market context moderations2011In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 418-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the competition antecedents and performance effects of firm product/customer scope, and the moderating role of market growth. The theoretical model follows the contingency perspective on strategy and draws on the strategy and competitive dynamics literature. A questionnaire was used to gather the quantitative data for testing the hypotheses using regression analyses. The questionnaires were completed by executives of 432 Swedish industrial firms serving business customers. The firms offering clean technology products operate in growing markets while the firms offering miscellaneous products operate in mature markets. Competition is an antecedent of firm product/customer scope. The more competitive the action of the main competitor, the more limited the customer scope of the firm if it operates in a mature market. The impact of the main competitor’s scope is robust across all market contexts. Furthermore, the broader the product scope of the firm, the better the financial performance if the firm operates in a growing market. The study contributes theoretically, as it extends our knowledge of crucial relationships of firm product/market scope. A firm must be aware of its main competitor’s scope and action, and adapt its scope to the level of market growth. The theoretical model and the tests go beyond those used in previous research. Another key value is the analysis of perceptual data gathered from executives. Earlier studies of competition assume equal perceptions among competing firms and do not acknowledge that market contexts are ambiguous realities.

  • 14.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Sequential expansion in a foreign market: knowledge drivers and contingencies of establishments of additional subsidiaries2016In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 285-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – A multinational firm’s expansion in a foreign market is a key issue of internationalbusiness. The purpose of this study is to extend the understanding of essential drivers that will facilitatefirm’s assessment of alternative modes of sequential expansion.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study applies the knowledge-based view and explores amultinational firm’s sequential post-entry expansion in a foreign market. Event histories of Swedishindustrial firms’ establishments of wholly owned subsidiaries in Germany, the UK and the USA wereexplored using Cox regression.

    Findings – Broad market experiences stemming from corporate strategy and deep experiences fromthe preceding subsidiary increase the likelihood of a sequential investment. Effects of broad experiencesare contingent on the context specified by the geographic scope of the firm and its general subsidiaryexperience.

    Research limitations/implications – The study contributes to international expansion theory andintegrates sources of knowledge originating from strategy theory and internationalization theory. Thestudy shows that the dual approach is needed to understand international expansion.

    Practical implications – In evaluating a further subsidiary investment in a foreign market, themultinational firm is advised to assess whether it possesses enough market experiences to justify theinvestment. The experiences should be associated with corporate strategy, the previous wholly ownedsubsidiary and the context specifications identified in the study.

    Originality/value – The study is unique, as it addresses the simultaneous impact of broad and deepmarket experiences. Also, the inclusion of central context specifications makes the study novel.

  • 15.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. Marknadsföring.
    Value adding in foreign markets: A three-country study of associations of strategy and performance2008In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 20-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to extend our knowledge of industrial firms’ international strategy implementation by exploring key associations pertaining to types of value adding in foreign markets. The questions are: How are types of value adding in foreign markets associated with differentiation attributes? How are the types associated with the performance of foreign units?

    Design/methodology/approach – A hypothesized model is developed. The key terms (type of value adding, differentiation attributes, financial performance) are operationalized. A questionnaire was used to collect the quantitative data necessary to test the hypotheses using Anova analyses. The questions were answered by managers of 191 subsidiaries of Swedish manufacturing firms in Germany, the UK and the USA.

    Findings – Firms with product development in foreign markets are associated with a limited focus on product attributes in trying to receive orders compared with firms without such local value adding. Local customer services are related to a limited emphasis on product attributes as well, but such services are associated with an emphasis on customer flexibility attributes. Foreign product development and customer services are associated with high performance. Interpretations of the findings are discussed.

    Implications – The study contributes theoretically as it extends our knowledge of international strategy implementation. In the search for the type of value adding in a foreign market, the industrial firm is recommended to be aware of the general associations among the types, and the differentiation attributes and performance established in the study.

    Originality/value – The application of a local perspective goes beyond what has been done in the dominant head quarter studies in previous research. Another key value is the analysis of perceptual data collected from managers responsible for foreign subsidiaries.

  • 16.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Pehrsson, Tobias
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Consistent resource base of a foreign subsidiary’s greenfield expansion: a conceptual framework and propositions2014In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 64-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose is to extend the understanding of the resource base of the industrial firm’s greenfield expansion on a foreign country market once a wholly owned subsidiary has been established.

    Design/methodology/approach – A conceptual framework is developed relying on the

    resource-based theory of strategy. Resource bases in terms of value-adding activities of four

    Swedish industrial firms’ subsidiaries in the USA are analysed. Four theoretical propositions are formulated regarding consistent associations among the activities and contingencies that are relevant to expansion on a foreign country market.

    Findings – The propositions show how foreign subsidiaries’ value-adding activities are aligned with two contingencies: the corporate strategy manifested by the product/market knowledge transferred from the parent firm that enable local expansion and the subsidiary’s knowledge of competition barriers that obstruct local expansion. The value-adding activity may be basic or advanced and may repeat the parent firm’s activity.

    Research limitations/implications – US subsidiaries of four Swedish industrial firms were

    analysed. The propositions may be turned into hypotheses suitable for tests in statistical studies. A test may include firms from different home countries and subsidiaries on different host country markets.

    Practical implications – The conceptual framework and the propositions provide a ground for an industrial firm’s decision to conduct a strategy of greenfield expansion on a foreign country market once a wholly owned subsidiary has been established.

    Originality/value – The framework is unique and emphasizes that both knowledge stemming from corporate strategy and knowledge of local competition need to be acknowledged in order to understand firm’s greenfield expansion on a foreign country market.

  • 17.
    Pehrsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University.
    Business strategy in different contexts2011In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 23, no 5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have produced extensive knowledge of the content of business strategy and the process of formulating and implementing strategy. We also know that business strategy cannot be isolated from the environmental context in which the strategy is shaped. As a certain business strategy concerns a set of products that are brought to a market, the market context is important. Further, customers and competitors are major actors of a market, and the structure and behaviour of these actors generally manifest characteristics of the market context. However, our knowledge of the impact of the market context is limited.

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