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  • 1.
    Angelova, Vera
    et al.
    Technische Universität Berlin, Germany.
    Giebe, Thomas
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Ivanova-Stenzel, Radosveta
    Technische Universität Berlin, Germany.
    Does a short-term increase in incentives boost performance?2018In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 166, p. 31-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If agents are exposed to continual competitive pressure, how does a short-term variation of the severity of the competition affect agents’ performance? In a real-effort laboratory experiment, we study a one-time increase in incentives in a sequence of equally incentivized contests. Our results suggest that a short-term increase in incentives induces a behavioral response but does not boost total performance.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    In-group gender bias in hiring: real-world evidence2019In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 185, article id 108686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate in-group gender bias in real-world hiring decisions by combining administrative data with data from a large-scale field experiment on hiring in which fictitious resumes with randomly assigned information about gender were sent to Swedish employers. Our results suggest that women (female recruiters or firms with a high share of female employees) favor women in the recruitment process. In contrast, we do not find much evidence that men (male recruiters or firms with a high share of male employees) favor men.

  • 3.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Saarela, J
    Selection in Migration and Return-Migration: Evidence from Micro Data2007In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linked micro data from Sweden and Finland confirm predictions of migrant selection theory. Migrants are found to be negatively and return migrants positively selected on observable skills, whereas there is only minor selection on unobservable skills.

  • 4.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Saarela, Jan
    Selection in migration and return migration: Evidence from micro data2007In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linked micro data from Sweden and Finland confirm predictions of migrant selection theory. Migrants are found to be negatively and return migrants positively selected on observable skills, whereas there is only minor selection on unobservable skills. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Uddin, Gazi Salah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gencay, Ramazan
    Simon Fraser Univ, Canada.
    Bekiros, Stelios
    European University Institute, Italy;Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece.
    Sahamkhadam, Maziar
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Management Accounting and Logistics.
    Enhancing the predictability of crude oil markets with hybrid wavelet approaches2019In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 182, p. 50-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the robustness, efficiency and accuracy of the multi-scale forecasting in crude oil markets. We adopt a novel hybrid wavelet auto-ARMA model to detect the inherent nonlinear dynamics of crude oil returns with an explicitly defined hierarchical structure. Entropic estimation is employed to calculate the optimal level of the decomposition. The wavelet-based forecasting method accounts for the chaotic behavior of oil series, whilst captures drifts, spikes and other non-stationary effects which common frequency-domain methods miss out completely. These results shed new light upon the predictability of crude oil markets in nonstationary settings. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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