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  • 1.
    Alkhaled, Sophie
    et al.
    Univ Lancaster, UK.
    Berglund, Karin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Stockholm University.
    "And now I'm free': Women's empowerment and emancipation through entrepreneurship in Saudi Arabia and Sweden2018In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 30, no 7-8, p. 877-900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical perspectives have called for the study of women's entrepreneurship as a route to social change. This social turn' claims women are empowered and/or emancipated through entrepreneurship with limited problematisation of how these interchangeably used concepts operate. Using an institutional perspective in combination with a narrative approach, we investigate women entrepreneurs' life stories on their road to freedom' where entrepreneurial activity enables them to break free' from particular gendered constraints. Through juxtaposing women's narratives in the contexts of Saudi Arabia and Sweden, the relationship between empowerment and emancipation is disentangled and (re)conceptualised. The findings distinguish between empowerment narrated as individual practices to achieve freedom for the self within institutional structures and emancipation as narrated as a wish to challenge and change structures of power and reach collative freedom. The yearning for collective emancipation propels women's stories of entrepreneurship by raising expectations for entrepreneurship as a vehicle for institutional change. Such stories may fascinate and inspire others to engage in entrepreneurial endeavours to become empowered, but whether they reach emancipation remains an empirical question to be answered. The performative dimension of entrepreneurial narratives is, however, their ability to turn emancipation into an (un)reachable object of desire, with a quest for even more individual empowerment and entrepreneurial activity, at the same time excluding other forms of human conduct as conducive for change.

  • 2.
    Bengt, Johannison
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Marcela, Ramírez-Pasillas
    Gösta, Karlsson
    The institutional embeddedness of local inter-firm networks: a leverage for business creation2002In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 14, p. 297-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing concern for the notion of ‘embeddedness’ of economic activity; yet the conceptualization of the concept and its operationalization remain underdeveloped. First, embeddedness may concern, on the one hand, the structure of relations that tie economic actors together (structural embeddedness) and, on the other hand, the social strands supplementing economic strands in each relation (substantive embeddedness). In this paper, a network framework is outlined which proposes several layers or ‘orders’ of embeddedness. Focusing on small firms, the point of departure is individual exchange relationships as personal ties combining economic and social concerns. First-order embeddedness concerns the localized business networks created by combining these dyadic relations. Second-order embeddedness is achieved when considering also the memberships of business persons in economic and social local institutions while third-order embeddedness concerns the special cases where these institutions bridge gaps between firms. The network model is operationalized and applied to a small Swedish industrial (furniture) community, its firms and economic/social institutions. The findings generally support the applicability of the model and demonstrate the supplementarity of different layers/orders of embeddedness. Further research challenges are deduced and implications for practitioners are provided.

  • 3. Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders W
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Entrepreneurship and Conscientization in Processes of Regional Development2007In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 499-525Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Boso, Nathaniel
    et al.
    University of Leeds, UK.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Management Accounting and Logistics.
    Hultman, Magnus
    University of Leeds, UK.
    International entrepreneurial orientation and regional expansion2017In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 29, no 1-2, p. 4-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how behavioral elements of international entrepreneurial orientation (i.e. product innovativeness, risk-taking, proactiveness, competitive aggressiveness, and autonomy) increase variability in scope of regional market expansion, and the international marketing channel management conditions under which this occurs. Results from an empirical study in a developing market show that not all behavioral elements of international entrepreneurial orientation (IEO) increase scope of regional expansion. The study specifically finds that scope of regional expansion is fostered when high levels of product innovation intensity, risk-taking, competitive aggressiveness, and autonomous behaviors are aligned with a stronger channel management capability. Conversely, the regional expansion values of product innovation novelty and proactiveness are cancelled out when channel management capability levels are high.

  • 5.
    Fayolle, Alain
    et al.
    Emlyon Business School, France.
    Landström, Hans
    Lund University.
    Gartner, William B.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark ; California Lutheran University, USA.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm Business School.
    The institutionalization of entrepreneurship: questioning the status quo and re-gaining hope for entrepreneurship research2016In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 477-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we briefly identify three main challenges/issues that should be taken into consideration in the institutionalization of entrepreneurship research: (1) recognizing the complexity of the phenomenon under study; (2) producing interesting, relevant and useful research results for all stakeholders; and (3) developing a critical posture in research. Following the discussion of these challenges/issues we introduce the five contributions to the Special Issue that, in different ways, problematize and challenge mainstream research and approaches. These articles use ‘dissensus discourses’, apply critical, ideological and paradigmatic stances and in some cases underline the importance of contextual factors.

  • 6.
    Gartner, William B.
    Clemson University, USA.
    Creating a community of difference in entrepreneurship scholarship2013In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for alternative forms of inquiry for exploring aspects of entrepreneurship scholarship that are often unseen, ignored or minimized. The label, ‘The European School of Entrepreneurship’, might serve as a useful rubric for identifying a community of scholars with tendencies towards the following: (1) an interest in the history of ideas that inform entrepreneurship scholarship, (2) a willingness to step outside of the entrepreneurship field, itself, to embrace a variety of ideas, particularly from philosophy and the humanities and (3) a concern for the ‘other’, so as to challenge the unspoken and often unrecognized ‘taken-for-granted’ aspects of what entrepreneurship is and what it might be. Such tendencies are fundamentally different by degree (rather than contrast) from current norms; yet,these tendencies can make a significant difference in current scholarly practice in entrepreneurship, as well as our understanding of entrepreneurial phenomenon.

  • 7.
    Gartner, William B.
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark;Californian Lutheran University, USA.
    Stam, Eveline
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Thompson, Neil
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Verduyn, Karen
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Entrepreneurship-as-practice: grounding contemporary theories of practice into entrepreneurship studies2016In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 813-816Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hammarstedt, Mats
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Immigrant self-employment in Sweden - its variation and some possible determinants2001In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 147-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines self-employment among immigrants in Sweden. There are differences in the self-employment rate between immigrants and the native population and between different immigrant groups, both in the raw data and after controlling for variables such as age, gender, education and civil status. The study shows that non-Nordic immigrants in Sweden who arrived at an early date have higher self-employment rates than the native population. It seems as if self-employment among immigrants is to some extent positively correlated with time elapsed after arrival in the country. A number of possible explanations for the observed differences in self-employment between immigrants and natives and between different immigrant groups are presented in the study. Plausible explanations for the observed differences in self-employment rates are differences in traditions from the home country, differences in the labour market situation, and often a lack of knowledge among immigrants about the practical and formal matters an individual encounters when trying to establish a business.

  • 9. Hjalmarsson, Dan
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Public Advisory Services - Theory and Practice2003In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 83-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public advisory service to SMEs is a multibillion pound activity throughout the industrialized world. Yet very little research has been done on the theoretical basis for this field. This paper proposes some elements in a theoretical understanding of the rationale behind public measures. The authors argue that public intervention should be considered at two levels, as a public market intervention and as a consultant-client relation at the micro level. At the market intervention level, public advisory service is seen in the perspective of economic theory, comparing neo-classical and neo-Austrian theory. Two different kinds of services are identified and discussed: operational and strategic. At a micro level, the concepts of client identity and clientifying power relations serve to understand the small business manager's way of responding to services. In combining both levels - the market perspective and the micro level - it is argued that the neo-classical theory is connected to operational/expert services and objectifying power technologies. The neo-Austrian theory corresponds with the empirical findings at the micro level showing strategic services embedded in a subjectifying power technology. With the neo-Austrian perspective the rather symmetrical relations between client and consultant at the micro level is comprehensible

  • 10.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Disclosing everyday practices constituting social entrepreneuring - a case of necessity effectuation2018In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 30, no 3-4, p. 390-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship scholars have become increasingly aware of the need to recognize situated and temporary practices as the core of organizing in general, and of entrepreneuring as a processual phenomenon in particular. Close-up and longitudinal empirical inquiry into a Swedish work-integrating social enterprise, and its everyday procedures, uncovered several core process practices. The transformation of this enterprise into a national franchisor constructed further processual practices. These practices are comparable with the principles constituting the logic of effectuation. The findings tell that a different kind of effectuation logic rules in social enterprises, as much as the task is not profit-making but supporting people with social needs. The notion of necessity effectuation' is thus introduced to denote this logic. The empirical research in the social enterprise also reveals structural practices, here interpreted as dualities, that frame the processual practices. In social entrepreneuring a weaving metaphor, with the structural practices as the warp and the processual ones as the weft elements, thus appears as appropriate.

  • 11.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Limits to and prospects of entrepreneurship education in the academic context2016In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 403-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process philosophy has drawn attention to the world as ambiguous and ever changing, however also enactable. This makes entrepreneurship a processual phenomenon, rightly addressed as ‘entrepreneuring’. Recognizing not only their cognitive, yet also affective and conative capabilities, makes it possible for human actors to mobilize forces that bring the world to a standstill long enough to create a venture for value creation. This, however, calls for the insight that is different to universal scientific knowledge – episteme and techne – namely, the situated insights that Aristotle addressed as mētis and phronesis. Mētis then concerns alertness and shrewdness and phronesis is about prudence in the context of action. Academic education can only provide these competencies needed to train for entrepreneuring by letting the students travelling across the boundaries of the university. In addition, the dominance of management as an ideology must be proactively dealt with. Three cases in academic training for entrepreneuring, all in the Swedish context, which show radically different ways of dealing with these challenges, are presented in a comparative analysis. The lessons are summarized in general conditions for providing training that advances entrepreneurship students’ situated and actionable insights.

  • 12.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University ; National Institute for Working Life.
    Swedish tribalism and Tanzanian entrepreneurship: preconditions for trust formation2006In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 91-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to explore the preconditions for trust formation using a comparative approach. It takes an empirical point of departure, in two longitudinal and ethnographically inspired studies in the differing contexts of Sweden and Tanzania. The comparison reveals many similarities between the contexts with regard to the influence of informal institutions, as well as the significance of categories in trust formation. Perhaps surprisingly, trust and co-operation are not as low as could be expected in Tanzania, given the inadequate formal institutional environment, but instead, the greater need for co-operation evoked entrepreneurial initiatives that enabled the creation of trust. While the Swedish small-business owners could afford their ‘tribalism’, Tanzanians created trust in an entrepreneurial way. The importance of interventions to understand the local institutional framework is highlighted and it is argued that arranging business training, or similar events, is a fruitful way to facilitate the trust creation process in development contexts.

1 - 12 of 12
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