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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Ali
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics. Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study.
    Salas, Osvaldo
    University of Gothenburg.
    Implicit influences of Christian religious representations on dictator and prisoner’s dilemma game decisions2011In: The Journal of Socio-Economics, ISSN 1053-5357, E-ISSN 1879-1239, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 242-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate how implicit influences of Christian religious representations affect prosociality. We examine the direct impact of religion as an independent variable on prosocial behavior. We do so by priming participants with religious words in a scrambled sentence task before they make a dictator game and a prisoner's dilemma game decision. Priming religious words significantly increased prosocial behavior in both games: participants in the treatment group were more generous and cooperative than participants in the control group. The priming effect was present regardless of participants’ self-reported religiosity. Self-reported religiosity was not correlated with generosity or cooperation.

  • 2. Boero, Riccardo
    et al.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Universita di Torino, Italy.
    Castellani, Marco
    Squazzoni, Flaminio
    Reputational cues in repeated trust games2009In: The Journal of Socio-Economics, ISSN 1053-5357, E-ISSN 1879-1239, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 871-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of reputation in human societies is highlighted both by theoretical models and empirical studies. In this paper, we have extended the scope of previous experimental studies based on trust games by creating treatments where players can rate their opponents’ behavior and know their past ratings. Our results showed that being rated by other players and letting this rating be known are factors that increase cooperation levels even when rational reputational investment motives are ruled out. More generally, subjects tended to respond to reputational opportunities even when this was neither rational nor explainable by reciprocity.

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