lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berg, Siv Hilde
    et al.
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Akerjordet, Kristin
    University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Aase, Karina
    University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Methodological strategies in resilient health care studies: an integrative review2018In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 110, no Part A, December, p. 300-312Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilient healthcare research focuses on everyday clinical work and a system’s abilities to adopt or absorb disturbing conditions as opposed to risk management approaches, which are based on retrospective analyses of errors. After more than a decade of theoretical development and a large quantity of empirical work, the field of resilience is beginning to recognize the methodological challenges related to operationalizing and designing studies of complexity. This paper reviews a sample of empirical articles on studies of resilient healthcare to describe and synthesize their methodological strategies. The review found that data collection by resilient healthcare studies has predominantly been conducted at the micro level (e.g. frontline clinical staff). Data sources at the meso level (i.e. hospital/institution) have been limited, and no studies were found that collected macro-level data. We argue that the methodological focus in the field should increase its embrace of complexity and the adaptive capacities of the system as a whole by integrating data sources at the micro, meso, and macro levels. To improve the methodological designs, we argue that the resilience construct, in which the complexity of multiple levels is integrated, must be developed. Improving the transparency and quality of future resilient healthcare research might be accomplished by reporting thorough descriptions of analytical strategies, in-depth descriptions of research design and sampling strategies, and discussing internal and external validity and reflexivity.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    After Fukushima: Safety culture and fostering critical thinking2020In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 124, p. 1-6, article id 104613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the background and aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, exploring safety culture in relation to three essential elements: (I) knowledge, (II) leadership (power), and (III) critical thinking. In my discussion, I establish links between safety culture and these key issues, advocating a long-term outlook on safety and risk management. These findings are based on case study analyses, involving evaluations of accident reports, dialogue seminars, and interviews with representatives of the nuclear community in Japan and Sweden. For the most part, the argument I will pursue is not concerned with what Japan could or should have done differently but the trials and hazards of our society. How, then, can we give the Japanese experience a broader significance? In safety-critical activities, we consider best practice the reliable response although its formulas may have to be modified to particular conditions and circumstances. In other words, there are tacit dimensions of knowledge related to professional activities that are vital to their overall quality. However, the impact of commercial pressures, formalization and the desire to measure, monitor, and control the culture and behavior of workers may force professionals to deprioritize their judgments. Also, disempowerment of knowledge tends to upset the proactive and critical thinking of operatives and employees. If we interpret this as a process of complacency or degeneration, we should consider possible counterweights.

  • 3.
    Boström, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Mind the Gap!: A quantitative comparison between ship-to-ship communication and intended communication protocol2020In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 123, p. 1-8, article id 104567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Icebreaker operations, when an icebreaker assists other vessels through ice-packed fairways, are hazardous due to harsh environmental conditions and complexity of procedures. The severity of operations is further aggravated by the necessity for maintaining a small distance between the vessels, which consequently increases the risk of collision. Even though miscommunication is widely identified as a contributing factor to shipping accidents, previous research within winter navigation has focused largely on technical aspects of icebreaker operations to increase the operational safety. This study aimed to investigate to what extent closed-loop communication is used during icebreaker operations, and whether this practice deviates from stipulated communication protocols. A quantitative analysis was performed, coding 40 days of verbal radio communication. Subsequently, the data was compared to the stipulated communication protocol outlined in the Standard Marine Communication Phrases. The results show that closed-loop communication is not utilized to its full extent. Some message types are completely repeated at a higher rate, mainly instruction and question, while other message types, such as information and intention often receive a yes-no answer. A full closed-loop, i.e. a completely repeated message followed by a confirmation, was only observed in 16.4% of the messages initiated by an icebreaker and 14.0% for the assisted vessels. Thus, this study clearly shows that there is a gap between actual language use and stipulated communication protocol. Finally, since misunderstandings during icebreaker operations can have serious consequences, more research is needed into the underlying reasons for miscommunication in situations with little room for error.

  • 4.
    Österman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Hult, Carl
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Praetorius, Gesa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Occupational safety and health for service crew on passenger ships2020In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 121, p. 403-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The service crew is a vital part of the customer experience on board passenger ships, but also has important duties in the safety organization in case of emergencies. Yet, they are not always recognized as seafarers and have received less attention in research that addresses occupational safety and health in the maritime domain.

    This study explores the occupational safety and health for the service crew working on Swedish passenger ships.The purpose is to analyze causes of work-related ill-health, investigate and identify important aspects of the physical, organizational and social working conditions. The study has adopted a mixed methods approach, including survey questionnaires, register data on reported long-term sick leave, and field visits on board.

    Key findings show that service crew on passenger ships report the highest levels of perceived exertion. They also have the highest rates of long-term sick leave lasting 60 days or more. Most diagnoses are related to musculoskeletal and psychological disorders. Important factors in the shipboard work environment include high physical load and strenuous working postures, poor workplace design, long working hours, limited time for recovery, and the perceived mental and emotional load that comes with unclear boundaries between work and recreation and the social interaction with customers and colleagues. The most prominent health promotive factors to reduce the perceived exertion are appropriate manning, time to rest, working with managers that attend to problems and experiencing good working relations with other departments on board.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf