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  • 1.
    Adetorp, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Förhistoriska bilder som religionsvetenskaplig källa: Några kriterier att beakta vid tolkningar av religionsikonografiskt material2011In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 65-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge when interpreting prehistoric art is that we often lack written source material, a contemporary text written by people who lived in the cultural context that is studied. It is therefore not uncommon to use texts that are younger than the material that we want to interpret. This could lead to misinterpretations and circular arguments. Images are cultural products formed by their contemporaries and influenced by older idea traditions. This article presents four criteria that might be worth taking into consideration when interpreting prehistoric religious iconography. The article discusses how one might proceed to study prehistoric religious art and what could be helpful to keep in mind when analyzing religions by means of pictures and material culture. 

  • 2.
    Adetorp, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Identitet och verksamhet: Hjulbärande gudinnor och attribut i mellaneuropeisk järnåldersikonografi2015In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 53-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the difference between identifying and classifying attributes and analyzes the problematic implications if we confuse the two. The empirical material consists of Gallic stone reliefs depicting goddesses with a wheel as attribute. Male deities depicted with wheels have mainly been identified as a Celtic Jupiter or a male sky god sometimes called Taranis. The Gallic goddesses show that the wheel attribute was not an identifying attribute exclusive to this god, but that it rather served as a marker for an activity shared by several deities, both male and female. The articles argument that we need to distinguish between identifying and classifying attributes in order to make a source critical and methodological correct iconographical interpretation, especially when we interpret iconographical representation without the aid of any written sources.

  • 3.
    Arvidsson, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Humanistisk religionsforskning: En otydlig tradition belyst av "Arbetets riddare"2013In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 2, no 60, p. 9-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The humanistic tradition within the study of regligions has currently lost much of its identity. It could be argued that it is in fact about to be devoured by approaches taken over from the social and antural sciences. By discussing some features that through the last 150 years have been seen as a typical for a humanistic methodology, and a couple of more idiosyncratic features, the author aims to initiate a discussion whether a humanistic study of religion is obsolete, or if it still is something wort preserving and developing. The arguments are supported by examples taken from the 19th century American Christian-socialist fraternity The Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor.

  • 4.
    Arvidsson, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Myt idag.: Tankar om myt, politik och kultur i vår samtid2012In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conditions for the creation, distribution and reception of myths have changed drastically during the late modern era. Do myths exist at all in the contemporary, Western societies? If so, where are they and what do we then mean by “myth”? The article is a sketchy overview of different areas where myths might be found, and the author simultaneous tries to discuss relevant definitions of myth. From the conceptualization of myth in the Enlightenment and Romantic era the article moves on to discuss the reception of mythology in New Age spirituality, the invention of Nationalist mythologies and the issue of myths in the products of the Culture industry and commerce. The main focus is on the debatable issue wither or not the liberal, “post-politic” discourse of contemporary Westerns democracies – a discourse often presented as drained of any fantastic rhetoric and only concerned with practical, instrumental decisions – could be said to contain myths.

  • 5.
    Arvidsson, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    [recension av:] Feldt, Laura (ed.), Wilderness in mythology and religion: approaching religious spatialities, cosmologies, and ideas of wild nature2013In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 1, no 59, p. 227-231Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Arvidsson, Stefan
    Lunds universitet.
    Stig Wikander och forskningen om ariska mannaförbund2002In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, no 38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Arvidsson, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Utsugare!: Begreppen revisionistisk och antirevisionistisk mytologi introducerade med hjälp av en vampyr- och varulvsfilm2011In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, no 52, p. 21-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Svensson, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Att äta en religion: Halalkyckling, essentialism och äcklets psykologi2015In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 29-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Svensson, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Preventionsstrategi eller problem?: Genus i en nutida inom-muslimsk diskussion om HIV/AIDS2012In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, no 57, p. 83-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article concerns the overlap of two sub-discourses within a larger contemporary intra-Muslim discourse on “Islam and modernity”: the sub-discourse on “Islam and gender” and the sub-discourse on “Islam and HIV/AIDS”. For this purpose, the article focuses on two examples of divergent, even opposing, Muslim religious approaches to of HIV/AIDS – the influential book The AIDS crisis by Sudanese-born and Malaysia-based psychologist Malik Badri and two texts outlining a “theology of compassion” championed by the South African organisation Positive Muslims and produced by its chief ideologue, Farid Esack. The article highlights the way in which the authors in these two examples address the issue of gender but also the role that gender, particularly in the context of sexuality, plays in how they, in quite different ways, approach HIV/AIDS from a religious perspective, and as a consequence explicitly and implicitly outline the role of Islam, and the means of its interpretation, in the contemporary world.

  • 10.
    Svensson, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Recension av Luther H. Martin och Jesper Sørensen (eds.) Past minds. Studies in cognitive historiography,  Equiknox, London, 2011. ISBN 978-1-84553-740-12013In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 237-239Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Svensson, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Vem äger den islamiska historien?: Om helig historia och historisk fiktion utifrån romanen Medinas Juvel2013In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 77-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In 2008 Random House cancelled the publication of Sherry Jones’ novel The Jewel of Medina. The measure was taken after consultations with “experts” who had warned the publisher that the portrayal of ‘A’isha and her life in the book might provoke negative reactions from Muslims. When the book was eventually out in 2009, by another publisher, reactions were in reality few. This article uses the novel, and some of the reactions to it, when probing into the question as to why the genre of historical fiction can be seen as problematic when it ventures into the domains of ”sacred history”. The suggested answer is that one of the main characteristics of the historical novel is the genre based acceptance of the freedom of the author herself to invent ”inner worlds” of protagonists and antagonists, in terms of wishes, intentions, feelings and motives. The ”inner worlds” of characters in a narrative are also central when such a narrative form part of a ”sacred history”, but in the latter case, they cannot, in order to function normatively, be viewed a result of the whims of an author, but instead must be conceived of as historical ”facts”. Hence, a potential for conflict emerges in relation to what neither an author of a historical novel nor someone who narrates “sacred history” can know for sure: what dwells in the minds of others.

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