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  • 1. Su, Yi-Ping
    et al.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Ozanne, Lucie
    Hospitality Industry Responses to Climate Change: A Benchmark Study of Taiwanese Tourist Hotels2013In: Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research, ISSN 1094-1665, E-ISSN 1741-6507, Vol. 18, no 1-2, p. 92-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hotels are one of the tourism businesses most vulnerable to climate change because of their fixed assets. Results are presented of a baseline study that explores the awareness, attitudes, and behaviours of Taiwanese tourist hotels with respect to climate change and its potential impacts as well as their overall environmental practices. Tourist hotels are defined by the Taiwanese government as hotel establishments of over 80 rooms in rural areas and 50 rooms in city areas. Although the 104 tourist hotels represent only 3.7% of the total number of hotels in Taiwan, they account for over half of international guest nights and had a combined revenue of over TWD$43 billion in 2010. Questionnaires were distributed via email to all tourist hotels in Taiwan and 45 valid returns were received, representing an effective response rate of 43.3%. The results of research illustrate the level of understanding of climate change within Taiwanese tourist hotels and identify the specific climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies that tourist hotels have initiated. Access to such baseline data provides a potentially significant contribution to evaluating the response of the Taiwanese accommodation sector to environment change as well as providing a basis for further comparative studies and benchmarking.

  • 2.
    Zhang, Jin-He
    et al.
    Nanjing Univ, Peoples Republic of China.
    Zhang, Yu
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Nanjing Univ, Peoples Republic of China.
    Zhou, Jing
    China Construct Engn Design Grp Corp Ltd, Peoples Republic of China.
    Liu, Ze-Hua
    Nanjing Univ, Peoples Republic of China.
    Zhang, Hong-Lei
    Nanjing Univ, Peoples Republic of China.
    Tian, Qing
    Tongren Polytech Coll, Peoples Republic of China.
    Tourism water footprint: an empirical analysis of Mount Huangshan2017In: Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research, ISSN 1094-1665, E-ISSN 1741-6507, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1083-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is an important factor for the sustainable development of tourism. We constructed a comprehensive model of the tourism water footprint (TWF), including tourism sewage and water for management, and used the world heritage Mount Huangshan as an example. The results showed that the total TWF, which included green, blue and grey water of Mount Huangshan in 2012, was about 10.19 million m(3)/year, approximately per tourist 3.39m(3)/day or 3387L/day. Tourism sewage and food were the main factors of water consumption. The spatial transfer of TWF led the spillover of tourism environmental impact, not only affecting Mount Huangshan but the Huangshan City and even nationwide. Tourist flow and temperature had a highly significant positive correlation with the TWF. Quantifying the TWF can reflect the pressure of tourists on water resources, and provide an effective decision-making basis for rational use of water resources.

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