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  • 1.
    Hilmersson, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Experiential knowledge types and profiles of internationalising small and medium-sized enterprises2014In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 802-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although experiential knowledge is a well-documented construct in the internationalisation literature, research on the multidimensionality of the construct remains limited and we do not know how different knowledge combinations among internationalising SMEs are composed. This article answers the research questions: is experiential knowledge in the internationalisation process a multidimensional construct, and is there a pattern to be found among the experiential knowledge profiles of internationalising SMEs? In the article, the multidimensionality of the concept is established and four experience-based knowledge profiles of internationalising firms are identified. First, four types of experiential knowledge are extracted: internationalisation, institutional, business network and social network knowledge. Second, four experiential knowledge profiles are identified: masters, institutional experts, social networkers and learners. The article concludes that experiential knowledge is a multidimensional construct and that internationalising SMEs develop heterogeneous experiential knowledge profiles.

  • 2.
    Hilmersson, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Small and medium-sized enterprise internationalisation strategy and performance in times of market turbulence2014In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 386-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the relationship between the strategies utilised by small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs) for international expansion, and their performance during market turbulence. Analysing the strategy process of firm internationalisation, three main dimensions of this unfolding process are condensed: the scale, scope and speed of firm internationalisation. The influence of these three dimensions on performance during market turbulence is explored using a hypothesised model tested through an integrated dataset combining data pertaining to firm strategy, and performance. The analysis demonstrates that the scope and speed of internationalisation render a positive performance effect, whereas the scale of internationalisation does not. The article contributes to knowledge regarding sustainable and successful internationalisation strategies during times of market turbulence.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Narrating the Entrepreneur2004In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 273-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the social sciences narrative approaches have become more popular. In recent years ithas also been suggested that entrepreneurship research would benefit from the use of a narrative approach. Interest in this direction is now emerging. The purpose of this article is to illustrate and reflect upon how narrative approaches can contribute to entrepreneurship research. The article is focused on three areas: (1) The construction of entrepreneurial identities, (2) Entrepreneurial learning, (3) (Re)conceptualizing entrepreneurship. It is argued that a narrativeapproach contributes to the literature by enriching the understanding of what motivates individual entrepreneurs and the way they run their businesses. Storytelling is closely related to entrepreneurial learning and complements other approaches. Furthermore, storytelling and story-making serve as potential metaphors for conceptualizing and reconceptualizing entrepreneurship.

  • 4.
    Weiss, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Anisimova, Tatiana
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Shirokova, Galina
    St Petersburg Univ, Russia.
    The translation of entrepreneurial intention into start-up behaviour: The moderating role of regional social capital2019In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 473-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the moderating role of regional social capital in the intention-behaviour link in entrepreneurship. We investigate to what extent the regional social capital context in which aspiring entrepreneurs are embedded strengthens or weakens the translation of individual entrepreneurial intentions into new venture creation activities. Our results suggest that the intention-behaviour link is weakened by cognitive regional social capital in the form of regional hierarchy values and strengthened by structural regional capital in the form of regional cultural diversity and regional breadth of associational activity, as well as by relational regional social capital in the form of high levels of regional generalised trust. Our findings suggest that to support new venture creation activity, there is a need to grow regional social capital via the enhancement of social trust, associational activities and regional cultural diversity - and at the same time decrease hierarchical social structures within regions.

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