lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ali, Tahir
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Larimo, Jorma
    University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Managing opportunism in international joint ventures: The role of structural and social mechanisms2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 86-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on transaction cost economics (TCE) and social exchange theory (SET), we develop an integrated framework in which reducing opportunism requires two sets of mechanisms: (1) structural mechanisms of symmetric dependence, symmetric equity share and resource complementarity, and (2) social mechanisms of trust, communication and cultural adaptation. The framework is tested empirically using web-survey data collected from 89 IJVs established by Nordic firms in Asia, Europe and America. Empirical data analysis based on structural equation modelling shows that TCE proposed mechanisms of symmetric dependence and resource complementarity, and SET proposed mechanisms of trust, communication and cultural adaptation reduce opportunism. Contrary to expectation, the structural mechanism of symmetric equity share does not reduce opportunism. In addition, interesting results are found related to interaction effects between social and structural mechanisms in relation to reducing opportunism.

  • 2.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Andersen, Poul
    Halinen, Aino
    Position and Role: Conceptualizing Dynamics in Business Networks1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 167-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University.
    To play or not to play: that is the question: Entrepreneuring as gendered play2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 206-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can play be used to unravel the discourse of the gendered hero entrepreneur and instead describe mundane entrepreneuring? Further, how can the doing of gendered social orders be problematized when entrepreneuring is equated with play? In this article we answer these questions by engaging with the French social theorist Caillois’ (1961)conceptualization of play as being at the heart of all higher culture. Two ethnographic cases act as our vehicle in analysing play as entrepreneuring. From a rich description of these cases we find that it is not a question of playing or not playing, but about how to play. All four forms of play described by Caillois are present, which illustrates the variation of entrepreneuring and the richness of activities conducted in the ‘doing of entrepreneurship’. Further, both ways of playing discussed by Caillois are found. Whilst these two ways are interrelated on a continuum in the theory of play, they have been separated in entrepreneurship discourse, where they underpin the tendency to differentiate between the hero entrepreneur and ordinary people. Finally, we engage in a more interpretive and reflective discussion on entrepreneuring as performative acts through which social orders can be not only reproduced but also transformed.

  • 4.
    Daudi, Philippe
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Con-versing on Management's Public Place1990In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 285-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The postmodern condition denotes a state in which the relativization of the knowledge and truth attached to the discourses of the social sciences appears to be provoking growing frustration and discontent. The emerging postmodern discourses represent this discontent, while at the same time underlining the problem of the ontological human knowledge. This article is an attempt to introduce the con-versational mode of knowing to the public place of management, with distanceas a fundamental ingredient. The aim is to see the present as remarkable, and management and organizations as peculiar practices to be problematized not naturalized, to situate current “truths” contextually and temporally, and to trace their correlated economies and emergence. The article also explores the significance of this problematique and discusses the contribution of the writings of some of the major postmodern thinkers.

  • 5.
    Ericsson, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Book review. Cinzia Dal Zotto and Hans van Kranenburg, Editors, Management and innovation in the media industry, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, UK (2008) ISBN 978 1 84720 1092010In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 97-98Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ericsson, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Power, knowledge and domination2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 162-163Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jansson, Hans
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    "The Struggle over Singapore's Soul. Western Modernization and Asian Culture"1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 223-225Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Jansson, Hans
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Sharma, D. Deo
    "Industrial Policy Liberlization and TNCs: The Indian Experience"1993In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 129-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years a number of host governments have declared their intention to liberalize their industrial policies toward transnational corporations (TNCs). Taking India as an example. economic liberalization is defined here as an industrial policy implementation issue, and is studied with reference to licensing procedures between 1984 and 1990. Liberalization is effected through a Government-TNC network. The four dimensions used to measure the results of liberalization show that this network has remained more or less intact during the period, so that it is still time- and resource-consuming to obtain licences. A study of changes in the number of controls and the efficiency of the executive bodies also indicates that policies towards TNCs have been only partially liberalized. This result is explained by an institutional organization theory.

  • 9.
    Kociatkiewicz, Jerzy
    et al.
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Kostera, Monika
    Jagiellonian University, Poland.
    After retrotopia: the future of organizing and the thought of Zygmunt Bauman2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 335-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main body of work of Zygmunt Bauman concerns his home discipline of sociology, but his insights have been influential also in the field of organization studies. In this text, we provide an overview of the extent of this influence, providing some additional context for positioning the other contributions to this special section. Afterwards, we explore in more detail two notions central for Bauman’s late thought: that of liquidity and retrotopia. The former constitutes the root metaphor for theorizing the current global predicament. In this text, we analyse how two modes of interpreting it, using the assumptions behind Kurt Lewin’s CATS model and the alchemical tradition underpinning Carl Gustav Jung’s conception of archetypes respectively, can help us theorize the alternative modes of organizing and managing encountered in a study of contemporary alternative organizations.

    These insights form the starting point for our second goal: to explore Bauman’s notion of retrotopia as a potentially fruitful starting point for discussing both the deficiencies of current visions of our future society, and the possibilities and vicissitudes of developing new forms of organizing and managing. Such new forms, both as practice and as theoretical constructs, are urgently needed if we are to face the numerous, and potentially catastrophic global challenges facing our society today.

  • 10.
    Kociatkiewicz, Jerzy
    et al.
    University of Sheffield.
    Kostera, Monika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Sherlock Holmes and the adventure of the rational manager: Organizational reason and its discontents2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 162-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary Rationality has since long been one of the central been issues in the discourse ofmanagement. Among the classics voices propagating a reductionist rationalism dominated andthere are still many contexts where such a view is taken for granted. On the other hand, criticssince the times of classics have been arguing for a less linear approach to management andmanagement thinking. However, little attention has been paid to some of the different dimensions of management rationality, such as imagination. This paper sets out to address this gap inknowledge through presenting a narrative study focused on a literary character well known for hisrationality, Sherlock Holmes, and revealing that this, to many, very epitome of rationality isactually an example of an extended type of rationality, including imagination. Following thefictional protagonist of our study, we consider some aspects of its relevance for management thought and practice

  • 11.
    Müller, Monika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Huber, Christian
    University of the Armed Forces in Hamburg.
    Constructing Identity in and around Organizations, M. Schultz, T. Maguire, A. Langley, H. Tsoukas (Eds.)2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 544-545Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Science.
    Ahl, Helene
    Jönköping University.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University.
    In the name of women?: Feminist readings of policies for women's entrepreneurship in Scandinavia2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 50-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy actors seeking to stimulate entrepreneurship sometimes give special attention to women. It is not given, however, that policy initiatives for women entrepreneurs necessarily contribute to gender equality, to social change for women - such as enhancing entrepreneurship as a means to women's wellbeing and financial or other independence - or to gendered change of society. We claim that the outcomes depend on the premises behind the policies. The purpose of this paper is to conduct an analysis of the feminist approaches that are taken in policies for women's entrepreneurship in the Scandinavian countries. We analyse how these policies argue for women's entrepreneurship, how they position women, and what assumptions they hold with respect to women and their businesses. We analyse and compare state-level polices that have been implemented by the national governments in three Scandinavian countries; Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, during the period 2005-2015. A comprehensive analytical tool, building on six different feminist theoretical approaches, is developed. We find that, even if a liberal feminist perspective is present, along with elements of other feminist approaches, polices give precedence to economic growth in a non-feminist fashion. Over time, economic growth becomes the key focus, while feminist approaches are silenced. We observe that, in the name of supporting women, the actual aim of policies for women entrepreneurs often seems to be economic growth, and women are seen merely as an untapped, and yet not fully adequate, resource. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Tillmar, Malin
    Linköping University.
    A Nurse and a Civil Servant changing institutions: Entrepreneurial processes in different public sector organizations2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 113-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion that there is strong connection between the private sector and entrepreneurship has resulted in entrepreneurship in the public sector being neglected. This in turn leads to theoretical, practical and political shortcomings. The role of entrepreneurs as change agents is captured in the concept ‘institutional entrepreneurs’, but most studies focus on actors on the higher levels. This article sheds light on previously forgotten or ignored entrepreneurial processes, those taking place within the middle levels of the public sector, and which result in institutional change. We elaborate on the characteristics of the entrepreneurial processes and their prerequisites. The framework draws on the tension between entrepreneurship and the institutional context, and suggests a multi-level approach, drawing on insights from both entrepreneurship studies and new institutional theory. The cases highlight the importance of being able to create alliances and find sponsors to ensure freedom of action and grant legitimacy. The enabling and constraining aspects of the institutional context are illustrated and discussed.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf