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  • 1.
    Alricsson, Marie
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet ; Griffith University Logan Campus, Australia.
    Domalewski, Debra
    Romild, Ulla
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Asplund, Ragnar
    Physical activity, health, body mass index, sleeping habits and bodycomplaints in Australian senior high school students2008In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 501-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents in the industrial world are becoming less physically active and are increasingly adopting a sedentary life-style in front of computers and television screens. OBJECTIVE: to determine self-related health, physical activity, sleeping habits, prevalence of overweight, and body complaints in Australian senior high school students. METHODS: Participants were 466 high school students aged 15-17 years enrolled in academic and vocational programs. A questionnaire was completed at two senior high schools with questions about weight and height, health, physical activity, type of physical activity/sport, intensity, sleeping habits, and possible injuries or complaints during the last three months. RESULTS: Seventy seven percent of the high school students participated in sports on a regular basis. Compared with vocational programs, more males and females in academic programs participated in sports (71% and 80% respectively) (p = .036). Males reported significantly better health than females (p < .0001). 65% of the study group reported body complaints during the last 3 months. A higher number of females than males reported complaints about the back (p = .007) and the hip (p = .05). Good sleep was reported in 82.1% of males and in 76.6% of females. In males, 44.3% were often sleepy in the daytime (females 56.6%, p < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Underweight, physical activity and good sleep are factors with significant positive effect on good health, whereas overweight is a negative factor. Proper sleep habits and higher physical activity levels should be promoted among high school students, and TV viewing time and video game use restricted. Additionally, schools should provide opportunities for young people to participate in a wider range of physical activities that address their individual needs while promoting the health benefits of engaging in regular exercise.

  • 2. Ekström, Annika
    et al.
    Hafsteinsson Östenberg, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Björklund, Glenn
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    The effects of introducing Tabata interval training and stability exercises to school children as a school-based intervention program2019In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1-11, article id 20170043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Physical activities during leisure time as well as school hours have changed over the past few years, with adolescents being less physically active and adopting a sedentary lifestyle. Objective The overall objective of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the feasibility of introducing a 4-min Tabata interval training into a lower secondary school context. A further aim was to evaluate the possible effects on: coordination, balance, and strength. Methods The study was conducted as an intervention study with a mixed-method approach. Forty-three children, aged 7-9 years, participated in the intervention group. Additionally, 13 children were recruited as a control group. The intervention itself was delivered by the teachers and was performed for 4-min every day in a classroom setting. All participants performed physical tests before and after the intervention period to evaluate the Tabata training. After the completion of the 6-week Tabata interval training, the four teachers were interviewed. Results The push-ups (p = 0.004), kneeling push-ups (p = 0.03), and standing long jump (p = 0.01) improved in the intervention group after 6 weeks. No differences were observed between the genders. The teachers experienced that it worked well to integrate the Tabata interval training in the classroom setting. Conclusion After 6 weeks, a school-based Tabata intervention program improved physical performance. The teachers saw no obstacles in including the Tabata intervention program in a classroom setting and pointed out several positive aspects such as an increased energy level and development in the children's movement patterns.

  • 3.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mittuniversitetet.
    Ahnesjö, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Awareness of current recommendations and guidlines regarding strength training for youth2014In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 517-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Physical conditioning of youth has always been a controversial topic as it raises ethical, physiological, and medical issues. Current recommendations and guidelines suggest that strength training is a relatively safe and worthwhile method in conditioning youth. This, however, requires well-informed coaches who follow age-appropriate strength training recommendations and guidelines, compiles well-designed strength training programs, and provides qualified supervision and instructions. The purpose of this study was to investigate coaches’ awareness of current recommendations and guidelines regarding strength training for youth.

    Method: A total of 39 football (US: soccer) coaches (34 males and 5 females) training boys in age groups 8–12 years were included in this study. Data were collected using an attitude statement questionnaire, and the assertions were based upon current recommendations and guidelines.

    Results: The results revealed significant differences among coaches in terms of knowledge of important aspects of strength training for youth.

    Conclusions: The results suggested that coaches in the present study were not aware of the latest recommendations and guidelines regarding strength training for youth.

  • 4.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg.
    Berg, Christina
    University of Gothenburg.
    Boldenmann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Accelerometer-measured pattern of sedentary time and physical activity among adolescents in a multicultural area characterized by low socioeconomic status2018In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 30, no 3, article id 20160061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe and analyze accelerometer-measured sedentary time and physical activity (PA) among adolescents in a multicultural area characterized by low socioeconomic status (SES).

    METHOD:

    Seventh-graders (n=114 (girls n=66), mean age: 12.8±0.8 y) were recruited from three schools in a multicultural area of the city of Gothenburg, Sweden. Sedentary time and PA were measured with ActiGraph™ accelerometers.

    RESULT:

    Of total wear-time, 70 (±6)% was sedentary, with girls being more sedentary than boys. Girls had less light PA (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) than boys. Similar patterns were shown during in-school and out-of-school hours. During wear-time, 53% had a mean of ≥60 min of MVPA per day, but only 6% of the girls and 24% of the boys were sufficiently physically active every day. Girls had more sedentary bouts of ≥10 min and fewer MVPA bouts of ≥5 min per day than boys. Those who participated in organized sports spent a mean of 15 more minutes of MVPA per day compared to those who did not. No association was observed between body mass index (BMI) and sedentary time and PA.

    CONCLUSION:

    Only a few adolescents from a Swedish multicultural area characterized by low SES met the PA recommendations every day, and girls were more sedentary and less physically active than boys. Adolescents involved in organized sports had more of MVPA per day than their non-involved peers. Sedentary time and PA were not related to BMI.

  • 5.
    Kahlin, Yvonne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Werner, Suzanne
    Karolinska Institutet ; Sophiahemmet.
    Edman, Gunnar
    Tiohundra AB.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mid Sweden University.
    Physical self-esteem and personality traits in Swedish physically inactive female high school students: an intervention study2016In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 363-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity provides fundamental health benefits and plays a positive role in physical well-being. The aim of this present study was to investigate whether a 6-month physical activity program could influence physical self-esteem and frequency of physical activity in physically inactive female high school students in short- and long-term periods and whether personality traits were related to physical activity behaviour and compliance with the program. METHODS: The study was a cluster-randomised controlled intervention study including 104 physically inactive female high school students aged 16-19 years, 60 females in an intervention group and 44 females in a control group. The intervention group exercised at sport centres at least once per week during a 6-month period. Questionnaires were used for evaluation. RESULTS: At a 6-month follow up, the intervention group improved physical self-perception in all subdomains and significantly improved physical condition, physical self-worth and self-related health compared to the control group. At 1-year follow up, 25 females out of 53 females were still physically active, and all ratings remained almost the same as at the 6-month follow up. There were no particular personality traits that were dominant in the groups. CONCLUSION: A 6-month physical activity program can positively influence physical self-esteem and the frequency of physical activity, both from a short- and long-term perspective.

  • 6.
    Kahlin, Yvonne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Werner, Suzanne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Romild, Ulla
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Self-related health, physical activity, BMI and musculoskeletal complaints - a comparison between foreign and Swedish high school students2009In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 327-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activities during leisure time and school hours as well as nutritional habits have changed over the past years by adolescents being less physically active and adopting a sedentary life-style. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences between foreign and Swedish high school students in terms of self-related health, physical activity, overweight, and possible complaints from the musculoskeletal system. METHODS: 1,090 high school students, 450 with foreign background and 640 with Swedish background, aged 16-26 years answered a questionnaire. RESULTS: A higher percentage of students with foreign background reported poor self-related health compared with students with Swedish background (p = .038). Students with a foreign background were to a greater extent less physically active than students of Swedish background (p = .003). No differences were found between the groups regarding musculoskeletal complaints. Students with foreign background were more often overweight than students with Swedish background and overweight was more frequent among males than females. Physical activity (moderate and high level) was concluded to be a factor with significant positive effect on self-related general health (moderate level p = .042, high level (p < .001), and musculoskeletal complaints were negative factors on self-related general health (p < .001). CONCLUSION: The results suggest that adolescents with foreign background should participate in physical activity to prevent overweight and thereby improve physical health.

     

     

  • 7. Molin, Ibe
    et al.
    Alricsson, Marie
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap.
    Physical activity and health among adolescents with cerebral palsy in Sweden2009In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 623-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common disorder of movement and posture in children. The disorder results from a non-progressive brain lesion occurring in the fetal or infant brain. Children with CP have challenges with movement, posture, and mobility that last a life time. Few studies describe physical activity and health among adolescents with CP. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe self-related health, physical activity, and body complaints among adolescents with CP in Sweden. Methods: A questionnaire was answered by 64 adolescents with CP, with 143 adolescents without disabilities serving as controls. Results: Adolescents with CP reported their general health to be better than adolescents without disabilities (p = .001). Adolescents with CP participated less than adolescents without disabilities in sport during recreation time (p = .009). About 19% of adolescents with CP were never or seldom physically active, compared with 8% in the control group (p = .025). A total of 50% of adolescents with CP reported musculoskeletal complaints during the last three months, compared with 69.5% in the control group. There was a correlation between musculoskeletal complaints and self-related health in adolescents with CP (p = .015) but not in the controls. Conclusion: Adolescents with CP reported their general health to be good. Adolescents with CP were less physically active than adolescents without disabilities. There was a correlation between musculoskeletal complaints and self-related health among adolescents with CP. Further research is needed to determine the cause of the low physical activity among adolescents with CP and also to determine the relationship between musculoskeletal complaints and physical activity.

  • 8.
    Nordahl, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Sjöström, Rita
    Mittuniversitetet, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap.
    Westin, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Werne, Suzanne
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Mittuniversitetet, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap.
    Experiences of returning to elite alpine skiing after ACL injury and ACL reconstruction2014In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the experiences of alpine skiing at the elite level after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction.

    Design: A qualitative approach where semi-structured interviews were conducted, and an analysis of the manifest content was performed.

    Participants: Five ski high school students, two male and three female skiers, who had suffered ACL injuries and undergone ACL reconstructions.

    Results: Seven categories were identified. The participants described their perceived opportunities with regard to returning to alpine skiing after ACL injury and reconstruction as something positive to do with self-belief, being mentally and physically prepared, regaining confidence in their own ability, being given time and using active strategies. In contrast, perceived barriers to a return to elite alpine skiing gave rise to negative feelings, for example, fear, disheartenment, a total lack of or ambivalent confidence in their own ability and the use of passive strategies.

    Conclusion: The two male skiers returned to alpine skiing. They reported confidence in their own ability, active strategies and support on all levels, as well as enhanced physical ability. The female skiers did not return to their pre-injury level of competitive alpine skiing. They stated a lack of support on all levels, deterioration in their physical ability and two out of three reported passive strategies and no or ambivalent confidence in their own ability. The most important factors were family support, support on all levels, access to a physiotherapist and time given.

  • 9.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Eight years secular trend of perceived physical self-esteem among Swedish young adolescents2010In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 237-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Archer, Trevor
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Svensson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Perlinger, Thommy
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Alricsson, Marie
    Physical self esteem- A five year follow up study on Swedish adolescents.2009In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 497-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the levels and inter-correlations of physical self-esteem, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and body fat and, in addition, distinctive of individuals with high vs. low physical self-worth in a longitudinal design during adolescence.

    METHODS:

    At mean ages 12.7, 15.7, and 17.7 years, physical activity (steps/day) was measured for four consecutive schooldays of 77 (41 girls) Swedish adolescents. Perceived physical self-esteem, height, weight, and at ages 15.7 and 17.7 years, body fat percent was also measured.

    RESULTS:

    Boys' physical self-perception scores were higher than girls' and an overall stability during adolescents was seen. High and low physical self-worth had a significant impact regarding BMI at ages 12.7 and 17.7 years and regarding body fat at age 17.7 years in both boys and girls.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Regression analysis indicated that BMI and body fat counter-predicted self-worth in girls age-dependently. Efforts to build adapted physical activity programs for overweight and obese are emphasized.

     

  • 11.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lunds Universitet.
    Objectively measured physical activity during a Physical Education lesson. A pilot study2010In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 469-476Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Karolinska Institutet / University of Gothenburg.
    Boldemann, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    SLU.
    Sternudd, Caharina
    Lunds Universitet.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lunds Universitet.
    Translating cycling into steps. The share of cycling in 10-year olds daily physical activity2013In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 171-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Active travel has a potential to increase children’s physical activity (PA). Pedometers offer a valid option to measure PA, but do not capture cycling activity. Children’s self-reported cycling distances can be analyzed by the Geografic Information System (GIS).

    Aim: To combine pedometry and GIS mapping to identify the relative amount of cycling in children’s PA.

    Study group: Of all children in 4th grade (n=187) in Staffanstorp Sweden, 144 had valid pedometer data. Fifty-six children were non-cyclists while 88 children (32 boys, 47 girls, 9 gender unknown) reported at least one cycle journey.

    Methods: Cycle trips were entered into GIS and calculated to total cycling distance. Average length of the single distances cycled per day was 676 m (SD=534 m). A previously reported cycling speed (13.5 km/h) was used to calculate time spent cycling. Consequently distance=676 m, speed=13.5 km/h=13,500 m/3600 s=3.75 m/s and time=676m/3.75m/s=180.26 s=3 min. Expenditure of 4 and 5 metabolic equivalents (METs) has in children been reported equivalent to 122 and 127 steps/min, respectively. We estimated 4.7 METs (13.5 km/h) as 126 steps for every min of cycling (127–122=5×0.7=125.5).

    Results: The daily mean cycle distance was 676 m, on average 379 additional steps/day for cycling children (min. 21, max. 1385, SD=299) with no gender difference. Additional “steps” obtained by cycling corresponded to on average 3% of their PA.

    Conclusion: The relative contribution of cycling in 10-year-old children’s PA level is quite small and stable between children across different levels of activity levels, regardless of gender.

  • 13.
    Raustorp, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Physical self-esteem: a ten year follow-up study from early adolescence to early adulthood2015In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: One variable that has been consistently associated with adolescents’ physical activity is perceived activity competence. Perceived physical (or sport) competence is considered a sub-domain to the physical self-esteem or self-worth (i.e., a person’s valuation of what is good and worthy in their self-description).

    Objective: This study aimed to describe levels of and inter-correlations among physical self-esteem, physical activity, and body mass index in a longitudinal design spanning adolescence to early adulthood.

    Materials and methods: At mean ages of 12.7, 15.7, 17.7 and 22.7 years, we measured perceived physical self-esteem in 39 (22 boys) Swedish adolescents. Physical activity (steps/day) for four consecutive schooldays, height, and weight were also measured.

    Results: No significant difference between the four time points for any variable of perceived physical self-esteem was seen, neither in boys nor girls. In general, all physical self-variables revealed non-linear trajectories across time, where the general trend was an increase during the younger ages followed by a decrease during older ages. At ages 12 and 15 years in boys and girls physical condition and physical strength as well as body attractiveness and physical strength, respectively, had the strongest correlations to physical self-esteem. At age 17 and 22 years sports competence had the strongest correlation to self-esteem in girls, while body attractiveness and physical strength had the strongest correlation to self-esteem in boys.

    Conclusion: An overall stability in physical self-esteem was found. However the impact of a sub-domain upon physical self-esteem vary during adolescence and early adulthood. Such information may be useful when creating physical activity programs that support and develop physical self-esteem.

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