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  • 1.
    Bokberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Behm, Lina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Evaluating person-centredness for frail older persons in nursing homes before and after implementing a palliative care intervention2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To evaluate person-centeredness in nursing homes from the perspective of frail older persons, before and after implementing an educational intervention about palliative care. Design A crossover design. Methods Forty-four older persons living in nursing homes were interviewed. A convergent mixed-method was used to analyse data. Results The older persons expressed feelings of unsafety related to shortcomings in staff. These shortcomings implied that the responsibilities of everyday activities and making the residents' existence more bearable were transferred to the next of kin. The dropout rate related to death and not enough energy was considerably high (51%) even though one of the inclusion criteria was to have enough energy to manage a 1-hr interview. This result supports previous research describing the difficulties in retaining older persons in research and indicated that the dose of the intervention was not sufficient to improve person-centred care.

  • 2.
    Golsäter, Marie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    Enskär, Karin
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HHJ, Avd. för omvårdnad.
    Contributing to making the school a safe place for the child: School nurses’ perceptions of their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore how school nurses perceive their assignment when caring for children having parents with serious physical illness.

    Design: An explorative inductive qualitative design.

    Method: The study is based on interviews with 16 school nurses. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The main category, “Contribute in making the school a safe place for the child”, reveals how the school nurses try to contribute to making the school a safe place for a child when his/her parent has a serious physical illness. They support children through individual support, as well as at an overall level in the school health team to make the school, as an organization, a safe place. Routines and collaboration to recognize the child when his/her parent has become ill is described as crucial to accomplishing this assignment

  • 3.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University;Uppsala University.
    Establishing a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden: a case study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 210-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The study aims to describe the establishment of a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden.

    Design

    A descriptive qualitative study.

    Methods

    A descriptive case study based on a review of 14 public documents and individual interviews with two experts in the area, analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    This study found that shared language, preservation of customs and habits and collaboration between the representatives of the municipality, Finnish-speaking migrant associations and staff at the nursing home influenced the development of the culturally specific nursing home for older Finnish-speaking people intended to avoid loneliness, isolation and misunderstandings among older Finnish-speaking. Collaboration between healthcare service for older persons and minority people resulted in an optimal culturally specific nursing home, simultaneously encountering the majority culture. Nursing and healthcare services need to be aware of positive effects of collaboration with stakeholders to achieve optimal culturally specific nursing homes.

  • 4.
    Kirsebom, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Hedström, Mariann
    Uppsala University.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala University.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala University.
    Transfer of nursing home residents to emergency departments: organizational differences between nursing homes with high vs. low transfer rates2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore possible factors in the organization of nursing homes that could be related to differences in the rate of transfer of residents from nursing homes to emergency department.

    Design: Explorative.

    Method: In a single municipality, qualitative and quantitative data were collected from documents and through semi-structured interviews with 11 RNs from five nursing homes identified as having the highest vs. six identified as having the lowest transfer rates to emergency department. Data were analysed by non-parametric tests and basic content analysis.

    Results: All nursing homes in the highest transfer rate group and one in the lowest transfer rate group were run by private for-profit providers. Compared with the low group, the high group had fewer updated advance care plans and the RNs interviewed had less work experience in care of older people and less training in care of persons with dementia. There was no difference in nursing home size or staff/resident ratio. The RNs described similar possibilities to provide palliative care, medical equipment and perceived medical support from GPs.

  • 5.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University, Sweden;University of the Free State, South Africa.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Rönning, Helén
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Nina
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Henricsson, Maria
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 664-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To continuing the quest of the concept of transition in nursing research and toexplore how the concept of transition is used in occupational therapy, oral health andsocial work as well as in interdisciplinary studies in health and welfare, between2003–2013.Design: An integrative literature review.Methods: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, DOSS, SocIndex, Social Science Citation Indexand AMED databases from 2003–2013 were used. Identification of 350 articles includingthe concept of transition in relation to disciplines included. Assessment of articlesare in accordance to Meleis’ typologies of transition by experts in each discipline.Chosen key factors were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).Results: Meleis’ four typologies were found in all studied disciplines, except developmentin oral health. The health‐illness type was the most commonly explored,whereas in social work and in occupation therapy, situational transitions dominated.

  • 6.
    Pettersson, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Marklund, Helén
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Sweden;Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lower knowledge about diabetes among foreign-born compared to Swedish-born persons with diabetes: a descriptive study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 367-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To compare foreign‐ and Swedish‐born persons, diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, to study whether there are dissimilarities in knowledge about diabetes and to study determinants of knowledge.

    Design A cross‐sectional descriptive study was conducted.

    Method Data were collected between September 2014 and March 2016, using the standardized Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT), statistically analysed.

    Results The results showed dissimilarities in knowledge between foreign‐ and Swedish‐born persons, supporting the hypothesis that foreign‐born persons had lower knowledge about diabetes than Swedish‐born persons. There was a relationship between poor knowledge and country of birth, marital status and employment status. Country of birth was the strongest independent determinant of knowledge about diabetes. The risk of poor knowledge was ten times higher among persons born in the Middle East or in another country outside Europe compared with Swedish‐born persons. Other influencing factors for poor knowledge about diabetes were being not gainfully employed and living alone.

  • 7.
    Skagerström, Janna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Sweden;Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Carin
    Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. KTH Royal Instute of Technology, Sweden.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Patient involvement for improved patient safety: a qualitative study of nurses' perceptions and experiences2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 230-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore nurses' perceptions and experiences of patient involvement relevant to patient safety.

    DESIGN: Qualitative design using individual semi-structured interviews.

    METHODS: Interviews with registered nurses (n = 11) and nurse assistants (n = 8) were conducted in 2015-2016. Nurses were recruited from five different healthcare units in Sweden. The material was analysed using conventional content analysis.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in four categories: healthcare professionals' ways of influencing patient involvement for safer care; patients' ways of influencing patient involvement for safer care; barriers to patient involvement for safer care; and relevance of patient involvement for safer care. The nurses expressed that patient involvement is a shared responsibility. They also emphasized that healthcare provider has a responsibility to create opportunities for the patient to participate. According to the nurses, involvement can be hindered by factors related to the patient, the healthcare provider and the healthcare system. However, respondents expressed that patient involvement can lead to safer care and benefits for individual patients.

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