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  • 1.
    Fälth, Linda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Nordström, Thomas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Ulrika B.
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    An intervention study to prevent ‘summer reading loss’ in a socioeconomically disadvantaged area with second language learners2019In: Nordic Journal of Literacy Research, E-ISSN 2464-1596, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 10-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summer reading loss is a documented reality for many students. Research has established differences in the contribution of summer reading activity between children from families with different economic status. In this study, 120 students in Grade 2 and 115 students in Grade 3 from a socioeconomically vulnerable area participated in a summer reading intervention. In addition, a control group from the same schools comprised of 106 students from Grade 2 and 94 students from Grade 3. Almost 90% of the participating students did not have Swedish as their native language. The participants were tested on reading skills, including word decoding, nonsense-word reading, word comprehension and reading comprehension, before and after the summer vacation. The intervention was planned together with teachers from three participant schools and leisure centers. Before the summer holiday the schools arranged reading weeks and library visits. The students were encouraged to read at home during the vacation and record the number of books read on a digital platform. The results showed that the largest effect sizes between groups (intervention and control) were observed for word decoding in Grade 2 and word comprehension in Grade 3 where the intervention group improved more than the control group. If summer learning loss can be avoided or limited, the treatment can be considered worth implementing

  • 2.
    Hallesson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Visén, Pia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Från källtext till elevtext: spår av lästa ämnestexter i elevtexter i en årskurs 5-klass2018In: Nordic Journal of Literacy Research, E-ISSN 2464-1596, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 98-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the article 37 student-texts written by 19 students in year five in Swedish middle school in thesubject of civics are analysed. The texts are written as the last step in a teaching cycle inspired by thereading pedagogy Reading to Learn (R2L). The aim of the study is to reveal how content and textualpatterns from two subject texts the students have read are reflected and adapted in the student-texts,as well as to discuss what those results can say about the students’ learning and socialisation into disciplinaryliteracy. The results showed that all student-texts retrieve general textual structure as well asmain genre structure from the read texts, as well as some linguistic features, but that the student-textsdiffered as to how students handled the contents from the source text. Three groups of texts couldbe distinguished which can be regarded as three steps of socialisation into disciplinary literacy. Theresults indicate that the teaching cycle within the R2L pedagogy can support students to take one ormore steps into disciplinary literacy. However, at the same time the strictly held structure might limitstudents’ own reflections and creativity, depending on how the task is formulated.

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