lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Foti, Dafni
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Manufacturing and properties of gypsum-based products with recovered wood and rubber materials2015In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 5573-5585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experimental production of gypsum-based products (cylindrical samples, solid bricks) using different fractions of wood chips and rubber particles was studied. Recovered rubber and wood materials were mixed with gypsum and water in various proportions to fabricate gypsum-wood and gypsum-rubber cylindrical samples and standard solid bricks with six holes using appropriate molds. It was shown that to manufacture gypsum-wood and gypsum-rubber products with good mechanical strength, coarse fractions of wood and rubber should be used, but the proportion of wood or rubber should not exceed 25%. No thermal conductivity differences were found between the wood-and rubber-type of gypsum products, and particle size and material proportion had no effect. Samples with fine wood and rubber particles present at a lower proportion (25%) exhibited similar sound absorption behavior. The solid bricks had slightly higher strength when loaded at the large surface of their lateral upper side than when loaded at the small surface. The bricks provided better thermal insulation than both the extruded and pressed house bricks but lower than that of insulating bricks. The emission of volatile organic compounds out of the bricks was at an acceptable level according to regulations for construction products.

  • 2.
    Blomqvist, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Berg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden;Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic.
    Distortion in laminated veneer products exposed to relative-humidity variations: experimental studies and finite-element modelling2019In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 3768-3779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A shortcoming of the laminated bending process is that the product may become distorted after moulding. This study focused on the influence of fibre orientation deviation for individual veneers on the distortion of a moulded shell. The distortion of 90 cross-laminated shells of the same geometrical shape, consisting of seven peeled birch veneers, were studied under relative humidity variation. All the veneers were straight-grained in the longitudinal-tangential plane, but to simulate a deviation in fibre orientation, some of the individual veneers were oriented at an angle of 7° relative to the main orientation of the other veneers in the laminate. A finite element model (FEM) was applied to study the possibility of predicting the results of a practical experiment. The study confirms the well-known fact that deviation in fibre orientation influences shape stability. The results also show how the placement of the abnormal veneer influences the degree of distortion. From this basic knowledge, some improvements in the industrial production were suggested. However, the FE model significantly underestimated the results, according to the empirical experiment, and it did not show full coherence. The survey shows the complexity of modelling the behaviour of laminated veneer products under changing climate conditions and that there is a great need to improve the material and process data to achieve accurate simulations. Examples of such parameters that may lead to distortion are density, annual ring orientation in the cross section of the veneer, the orientation of the loose and tight sides of the veneer, and parameters related to the design of the moulding tool.

  • 3.
    Danesh, Mohammad Amin
    et al.
    Islamic Azad University, Iran.
    Ziaei Tabari, Hassan
    Islamic Azad University, Iran.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Georg-August University, Germany.
    Nazarnezhad, Noradin
    Sari Agricultural Science and Natural Resources University, Iran.
    Shams, Morteza
    Islamic Azad University, Iran.
    Investigation of the morphological and thermal properties of waste newsprint/recycled polypropylene/nanoclay composite2012In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 936-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this research was to study the potential of waste polypropylene and waste newsprint fiber for making wood-plastic nanocomposites. We used 30 wt.% waste newsprint fiber and 10 wt.% compatilizer in this study. Nanoclay was used at two levels: 2.5 and 5% by wt. Materials were mixed with either recycled or virgin polypropylene. The effects of nanoclay (NC) on the mechanical and thermal properties were also studied. The improvements in tensile properties of the blended composites with the addition of NC were further supported by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) data. Thermal degradation behavior of the composites showed that the degradation temperatures shifted to higher values after addition of nanoclay. The XRD data showed that the relative intercalation of composites with 2.5% nanoclay was higher than 5% nanoclay. The experimental results demonstrated that the waste materials could be used as appropriate alternative raw materials for making low cost wood-plastic composites (WPCs).

  • 4.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Georg-August-University, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Mai, Carsten
    Georg-August-University, Germany.
    Effects of acid pre-treatments on the swelling and vapor sorption of thermally modified Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 331-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scots pine sapwood samples were pre-treated with a Lewis acid (AlCl3) and a combination of Lewis and protonic acids (AlCl3 and H2SO4), and were subsequently exposed to respective temperatures of 180 °C and 120 °C for establishing a comparable mass loss with those impregnated with demineralized water and solely thermally modified at 220 °C. Water impregnated samples dried at 120 °C also served as controls. The swelling behavior of all wood samples was examined with respect to maximum swelling in water, anti-swelling efficiency (ASE), shrinkage, and dynamic water vapor sorption at relative humidity ranges of 0% to 95%. The thermal modification at 220 °C diminished swelling and moisture adsorption, and also reduced moisture increment and decrement compared with the unmodified control. However, it was less obvious than both acid pre-treated samples. Excess surface work and Hailwood-Horrobin results calculated from water vapor sorption studies demonstrated that, at comparable mass loss, the available sorption sites were reduced to a greater extent by Lewis acid and combination of Lewis and protonic acids pre-treatment than the sole thermal treatment. This was attributed to more pronounced degradation of polysaccharides, mainly hemicelluloses and amorphous parts of cellulose, and to cross-linking of cell wall polymers due to the acid pre-treatments.

  • 5.
    Jiang, Wen
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Tomppo, Laura
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Pakarinen, Timo
    Karelia University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Sirviö, Juho A.
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Liimatainen, Henrikki
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Haapala, Antti
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Effect of Cellulose Nanofibrils on the Bond Strength of Polyvinyl Acetate and Starch Adhesives for Wood2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 2283-2292Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose is a competitive reinforcement material for usein biocomposite structures and fibrous products. In this study, adhesive mixtures of dicarboxylic acid cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were dispersed into commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) and starch adhesives, whichwere applied to Norway spruce (Picea abies) to assess their performance in wood joining. Single-lap joints were prepared and tested with PVAc mixtures with0 to 0.64 wt% CNFand starch glue mixtures containing 0 to 1.07 wt% CNF. CNF suspensionshaving three concentrations(0.64, 0.96,and 1.28%)were compared. The results showed that the optimum amount of CNF, 0.48% suspensions, added to PVAc increased the average lap joint strength (EN 205:2003) by 74.5% when compared to control specimens with pure PVAc. Correspondingly, 0.96% CNF suspensions also enhanced the strength of starch adhesive by 34.5%. Lower and higher CNF concentrations showed clearly inferior performance. (PDF) Effect of Cellulose Nanofibrils on the Bond Strength of Polyvinyl Acetate and Starch Adhesives for Wood

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Olov
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Träteknik.
    Torniainen, Petteri
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Träteknik.
    Dagbro, Ola
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Träteknik.
    Granlund, Kurt
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Träteknik.
    Presence of water-soluble compounds in thermally modified wood: carbohydrates and furfurals2012In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 3679-3689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With thermal modification, changes in properties of wood, such as the presence of VOC and water-soluble carbohydrates, may occur. Thermal modifications under saturated steam conditions (160°C or 170°C) and superheated steam conditions (170, 185, and 212°C) were investigated by analysing the presence of water-soluble 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), furfural, and carbohydrates in heat-treated wood. The influence of thermal modifications on Scots pine, Norway spruce, and silver birch was also studied. Furfurals were analysed using HPLC at 280 nm, while monosaccharides and water-soluble carbohydrates were determined by GC-FID as their acetylated alditiols and, after methanolysis, as their trimethylsilylated methyl-glycosides, respectively. The amount of furfurals was larger in boards thermally modified under saturated steam conditions than those treated under superheated steam conditions. Generally, more of HMF than furfural was found in the thermally modified boards. In process water, in which saturated steam conditions had been used, furfural and only traces of HMF were found. Higher content of water-soluble carbohydrates was found in boards treated in saturated steam rather than in superheated steam. After modification in saturated steam, substantial parts of the water-soluble carbohydrates were due to monosaccharides, but only traces of monosaccharides were found in boards treated under superheated steam conditions.

  • 7.
    Qian, Yang
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Dimensional Stability and Water Repellency of European Aspen Improved by Oxidized Carbohydrates.2013In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 487-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small samples from European aspen (Populus tremula L.) were impregnated with carbohydrates oxidized by Fenton's reagent using water in a vacuum, followed by heating in an oven at 103 °C. An antiswelling efficiency (ASE) of around 45% for wood treated with oxidized glucose and 35% for wood treated with oxidized sucrose was obtained. Samples treated with oxidized carbohydrates gave water repellent effectiveness (WRE) values over 35%. The decrease in cell wall thickness during impregnation was about 18% less in the presence of oxidized glucose than samples only treated with Fenton's reagent. An ASE of 20% for the wood samples that had been treated with oxidized glucose was obtained after 7 days of soaking in water. The reasons for the improvement in dimensional stability are discussed in this work.

  • 8.
    Sint, KM
    et al.
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany ; Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Koch, G
    Federal Research Institute of Rural Areas, Germany.
    Hapla, F
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Militz, H
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Wood anatomy and topochemistry of Bombax ceiba L. and Bombax insigne Wall2013In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 530-544Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Soltani, Abolfazl
    et al.
    Shahid Rajee Teacher Training University, Iran.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Taghiyari, Hamid R.
    Shahid Rajee Teacher Training University, Iran.
    Ghaffari, Ehsan
    Shahid Rajee Teacher Training University, Iran.
    Effects of heat-treatment and nano-wollastonite impregnation on fire properties of solid wood2016In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 8953-8967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of nano-wollastonite (NW) suspension impregnation on the fire-retarding properties of heat-treated solid wood of three species (beech, poplar, fir) were studied. Heat treatment was performed at two temperatures of 180 °C and 200 °C. Impregnation was carried out at a pressure of 3 bars for 30 min. The fire properties included ignition time, glowing time, back-darkening, back-splitting, back-firing, and length and width of the burnt area. Both impregnation with NW and heat-treatment generally improved all fire-retarding properties, although not always to a significant level. As a mineral material, NW acted like a physical shield against fire penetration into the texture of wood specimens, thus improving fire properties. Moreover, the high thermal conductivity coefficient of wollastonite increased the thermal conductivity of wood, therefore preventing the accumulation of heat at the point nearest to a piloted flame and contributing to the improvement of fire properties. The chemical degradation of wood cell components caused by heat-treatment further improved the fire properties. Cluster analysis indicated the significant effect of species on fire properties. Significant R-square values were found amongst fire properties related to the spread of fire on the surface of specimens. The combination of thermal modification and impregnation with NW provides suitable fire properties for solid wood.

  • 10.
    Torniainen, Petteri
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Elustondo, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Dagbro, Ola
    Linnaeus University, The University Administration.
    Industrial Validation of the Relationship between Color Parameters in Thermally Modified Spruce and Pine2016In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1369-1381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal modification causes the darkening of wood throughout its cross-section because of chemical changes in the wood. After treatment, naturally light wood species look darker or even tropical, depending predominantly on the treatment temperature and processing time. This study investigates the suitability of using color measurement to determine treatment intensity at the industrial scale. The color was determined using the L*, a*, and b* color space, also referred to as CIELab, and the relationship between lightness (L*) and the color parameters (a*) and (b*) was investigated for thermal modification treatments at 190 and 212 °C. The wood species studied were pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and spruce (Picea abies L.). The results showed that yellowness (+b*) and redness (+a*) had a significant prediction ability for class treatments at 190 and 212 °C, respectively. After treatment, there were no noticeable differences in color between the species, but sapwood was darker than heartwood in both untreated and thermally modified wood. The thickness of the boards had a proportionally darkening effect on the color values.

  • 11.
    Trischler, Johann
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Monocotyledons in Particleboard Production: Adhesives, Additives, and Surface Modification of Reed Canary Grass2014In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 3919-3938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a supplier to the furniture industry, the particleboard industry is searching for opportunities to reduce costs, weight, and formaldehyde emissions. One such opportunity is to use monocotyledons such as straw and hemp, as well as grasses like reed canary grass. A major problem when using reed canary grass or other monocotyledons in combination with wood is the difference in their surface properties, leading to poor reactivity and wettability with adhesives such as melamine urea formaldehyde. To this end, either the surface of the particles must be modified in some way, or different adhesives must be used. The purpose of this paper is to present adhesives, surfactants, coupling agents, and pre-treatment methods that can be used in combination with monocotyledons to improve compatibility with wood. Some of the methods have been tested on reed canary grass. The results show a wide range of strength values for the joint between wood and untreated or pre-treated reed canary grass glued with different adhesives, with and without a surfactant and a coupling agent. Isocyanate-based adhesives provided relatively strong bonds, and polyvinyl acetate, acryl, and epoxy adhesives were also effective. The most effective method was pre-treatment followed by adhesives in combination with a coupling agent.

  • 12.
    Trischler, Johann
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Luleå Univeristy of Technology, Sweden.
    Thörnqvist, Thomas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Evaluating the Competition of Lignocellulose Raw Materials for their Use in Particleboard Production, Thermal Energy Recovery, and Pulp- and Papermaking2014In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 6591-6613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing competition for raw materials between particleboard production, thermal energy recovery, and pulp-and papermaking. According to different scenarios, the consumption of lignocellulosic raw materials is increasing, which means that the competition is increasing. The primary production of lignocellulosic raw material in some regions may therefore reach the limit of sustainability; i.e., the lignocellulosic raw material must be used more efficiently to reduce the risk of a shortage. The physical and chemical properties of the lignocellulosic raw material of selected species have therefore been surveyed, and the raw material properties that are important for each of the three competitors have been defined. The aim of the study is to characterise the lignocellulosic raw materials according to the three competing users and to show whether they are high or low in competition. As methods, a relative ranking of the species regarding their raw material properties and regarding the requirements of the competitors as well as cluster analysis were chosen. The results show that the most favourable raw materials are from coniferous species, while monocotyledon species show an opposite trend.

  • 13.
    Wagner, Leopold
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bos, Clemence
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria ; Institute for applied materials, Germany.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Effect of Water on the Mechanical Properties of Wood Cell Walls: Results of a Nanoindentation Study2015In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 10, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a nanoindentation study on five different wood species in which the elastic and creep properties of the S2 cell wall layer and the middle lamella were determined. Measurements were carried out at relative humidities (RH) ranging from 10 to 80% as well as underwater. Indentation moduli were found to decrease by about a third in the S2 layer and by about half in the middle lamella between RH of 10 and 80%. Hardness dropped by 50 to 60% in this humidity range in both the S2 layer and the middle lamella. Creep parameters were almost constant up to a relative humidity of 40%, but they increased considerably at higher RH. The most pronounced change of reduced moduli and creep properties occurred between 60 and 80% RH, which is consistent with the expected softening of hemicellulose and amorphous parts of cellulose in this humidity region. Immersion into water resulted in a further decrease of the reduced moduli to about 20 to 30% of their values at 10% RH and to only about 10 to 20% for the hardness. This can be explained by additional softening of the less ordered regions of cellulose.

  • 14.
    Wang, Xiaodong Alice
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björnberg, Jonathan
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Wan, Hui
    Mississippi State University, USA.
    Niemz, Peter
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
    Effect of Low Temperatures on the Block Shear Strength of Norway Spruce Glulam Joints2016In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 9638-9648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The block shear strength of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) glulam joints was tested under low temperature. Glulam samples were glued with the three of the most common outdoor structural adhesives. The cold temperatures tested were 20, −20, −30, −40, -50 and −60 °C. Within the temperature test range, the block shear strength of the glulam joints was resistant to the effect of temperature. As the temperature decreased, the joints’ block shear strength did not show any significant change. In most cases, phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF) adhesive yielded the strongest block shear strength, while melamine-formaldehyde (MF) adhesive yielded the weakest block shear strength. Melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) adhesive yielded similar results to those of MF adhesives for all temperatures tested. The block shear strengths of the glulam joints with PRF, MUF and MF adhesives were not sensitive to temperature change. The results indicated that PRF, MUF and MF adhesives are stable for outdoor structural engineered wood construction in cold climate. The results also suggest that the SS-EN 14080 (2013) standard for the block shear method may not be the proper standard for testing differences in shear strength at different temperatures. The EN 302-1 (2011) standard could be more suitable for this purpose.

  • 15.
    Wang, Xiaodong (Alice)
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Bror
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Ormarsson, Sigurdur
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Wan, Hui
    Mississippi State University, USA.
    Niemz, Peter
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Shear Strength of Scots Pine Wood and Glued Joints in a Cold Climate2016In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 944-956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of cold temperatures on the shear strength of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) joints glued with seven commercially available adhesives was studied in this work. The cold temperatures investigated were: 20, -20, -30, -40, and -50 degrees C. Generally, within the temperature test range, the shear strength of Scots pine solid wood and wood joints were more resistant to the effect of temperature than those of Norway spruce. As the temperature decreased, only some of the joints' shear strength significantly decreased. In most cases, PUR adhesive yielded the strongest shear strength and MUF adhesive yielded the weakest shear strength. MF adhesive responded to temperature changes in a similar manner to that of PUR and PVAc adhesives. The shear strengths of wood joints with PRF and EPI adhesives were more sensitive to temperature change. For dynamic tests of shear strength, the values for 12-h and 6-day tests under temperature cycles (-20 and 0 degrees C) were compared. The values for 6-day tests were lower than those for 12-h tests. Therefore, the duration of the samples subjected to the same temperature had a significant impact on shear strength. Our results indicate that PUR adhesive is the most stable; whereas the stability of MUF and PRF adhesives decreased significantly.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf