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  • 1.
    Ekvall, Ulla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Towards Critical Literacy?: A National Test and Prescribed Classroom Preparations2013In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 243-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses, from a bilingual perspective, on how a Swedish national test is intended to promote critical literacy and language development in line with related aims in syllabuses for Swedish and Swedish as a second language. The material consists of reading and writing assignments and prescribed classroom preparations (including inspiration material). The method of analysis is Janks’ model for critical literacy education, focusing on orientations to domination, diversity, access and design. The main findings are that aspirations to critical literacy are lacking in both the reading and writing assignments and in the prescribed classroom preparations. The directions for using the inspiration material do not mention discussing power relations and there are no directions for explicit pedagogy demonstrating how the language of the inspiration story can be analysed as regards power expressions or other word choices suitable for the theme of the writing assignments.

  • 2.
    Fleischer, Håkan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Students’ experiences of their knowledge formation in a one-to-one computer initiative2017In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 123-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research on one-to-one computer learning settings shows what students do while using computers and how much they use them. It is believed that students are highly motivated by having computers of their own and show improved grades, but few studies can confirm this belief. This study investigated the experience of knowledge formation amongst pupils in upper secondary school in Sweden during a one-to-one computer-based task. The theoretical and methodological framework stems from Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, IPA. The analysis generated eight categories of statements, grouped into two themes: “Experience of processing the knowledge formation” and “Experiences of tool-handling. The article concludes with a proposal for how to expand on the students’ experiences, allowing for deeper learning from one-to-one computer-based paradigms.

  • 3.
    Fleischer, Håkan
    Jönköping University.
    Towards a Phenomenological Understanding of Web 2.0 and Knowledge Formation2011In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 537-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims to illuminate the character of web 2.0 out of a reading of Martin Heidegger in order to provoke new epistemological questions about web 2.0 and knowledge formation. The article applies the ontological grounds on which Heidegger described being-in-world and worldliness, out from the phenomenon of web 2.0. The article states that web 2.0 could both be considered to be a thing (in Heideggerian terms), but also as not being a thing. A thing, according to the character of equipment, the feature of self-sameness and by the fact that it is organized in equipmental nexus which makes it recognizable as a thing from different perspectives. However, it does seem to have unthingly features because of its lack of spatio-temporal fixation, the fact that there is no original and no copies of it, and that it lacks timely orientation. The article further discusses the way the world reveals itself while using web 2.0, and is proposing a new term for this kind of revelation, namely a stretched world. It finally discusses web 2.0 as a place for dwelling, and the epistemological consequences of these features of web 2.0 for knowledge formation. It proposes that research questions should be asked from the perspective that web 2.0 used for knowledge formation is something to act upon while stepping into it.

  • 4.
    Hedlin, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Admission policy of the Swedish teacher education favouring men: Discussion in the Parliament 19622012In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 227-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1962 the Swedish Parliament decided on a school reform. Meritocracy and equal opportunity were important goals. However, these ideals were not applied to elementary school teacher education, where a sex quota policy favoured male applicants. In the Parliamentary debate, a woman member of the Right Wing Party raised objections to the policy. A man representative of the Social Democrat government's education politics had to explain why the admission policy that favoured men was not abolished. By evoking historical ideas of women teachers as inferior, and warnings of the feminisation of schools as a great threat, the admission rules were defended. Also, the analysis of the debate shows that women were supposed to hold back their individual rights and a woman arguing in favour of a gender neutral admission policy risked being labelled as “unwomanly”.

  • 5.
    Hedlin, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers and school discipline 1960–1970: Constructions of femininities and masculinities in Teachers’ Journal2013In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 755-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A historical perspective may provide important insights for understanding contemporary discussions and the expectations attached to women and men in today’s teaching. The role of gendered meanings in relation to teachers’ work is explored in this article by focusing on discussions on school discipline during the period 19601970. Teachers’ Journal, a Swedish weekly union publication, is examined. The findings show that in the 1960s it was still possible for a male teacher to position himself as a ‘real man’ by defending corporal punishment. Further, the stereotype of a bad mother was taken up in the discussions. Discipline problems were connected to pupils not properly cared for by their mothers. Bad mothers were depicted as either lazy, overprotective or working women. In contrast, femininity, motherhood and paid work were linked in the caring female teacher. In the final section, the relevance of the findings for the present is discussed.

  • 6.
    Hedlin, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Åberg, Magnus
    Karlstads universitet, Sweden.
    Johansson, Caroline
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fun guy and possible perpetrator: an interview study of how men are positioned within early childhood education and care2019In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 95-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries call for more men to be teachers in early childhood education and care (ECEC). In Sweden, the issue has been discussed since the early 1970s, but despite these discussions there is little Swedish research that examines the notions and expectations associated with male teachers. International research has found that perceptions of men in ECEC can be very ambivalent and that physical contact between the male educator and children is a sensitive issue. By focusing on the interaction between educators and children, the purpose of this study is to investigate gender-specific beliefs about male preschool teachers. The empirical material consists of interviews with 50 informants. Of these, 17 are men and 33 are women. The results show that “the fun guy” and “the possible perpetrator” are two gender-specific positions that male informants are subjected to. The article discusses how men take up and resist the two positions, and argues for the need to further challenge gendered stereotypes in preschools.

  • 7.
    Nordin, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Crisis as discursive legitimation strategy in educational reforms: A critical policy analysis2014In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 109-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Around the mid-2000s a crisis discourse emerged in educational policy-making in the EU and in Sweden. Using the EU and Sweden as empirical references, this article explores how this crisis discourse has been and is employed by politicians and NGOs. Discourse Institutionalism is used as an overall theoretical framework focusing on how the crisis discourse is coordinated among powerful policy actors and communicated to the public, while critical discourse analysis is used for the systematic analysis. The crisis discourse implies that action has to be taken immediately and that there is no option other than to act, and the result shows that this normative discourse is becoming an important and powerful instrument in the hands of both national and transnational actors seeking public legitimacy for extensive reforms.

  • 8.
    Olteanu, Constanta
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Olteanu, Lucian
    Changing teaching practice and students’ learning of mathematics2010In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 381-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article forms part of a larger study aimed at supporting teachers in understanding their practiceand improving it. Students’ tests, an examination of students’ mathematical work, teachers’ lessons plans and reports of the lessons’ instructions are the base data for this article. The analysis indicated that the teachers were unable to describe the critical aspects in students’ learning at the beginning of the project. By giving teachers the training that allows them to become theorising teachers, they also obtain the possibility, as professional decision-makers, to develop the ability to identify the critical aspects of students’ learning and consider how opportunities for learning can be enhanced. The findings suggest that developing an understanding of students’ critical aspects can be a productive basis for helping teachers to make fundamental changes in their instructions and to improve mathematical communication in the classroom.

  • 9.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Maria, Johansson
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Combining entrepreneurship and mathematics in primary school: what happens?2018In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 331-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on an educational design research study exploring the potential of combining entrepreneurship and mathematics – two of the key competencies stressed as important in a society of lifelong learning. The aim of the study was to explore what happens when entrepreneurship is integrated into mathematics lessons. Eight Swedish primary schools were involved in the iterative design wherein researchers and teachers together planned, implemented, and evaluated lessons. The results indicate that combining entrepreneurial and mathematical competencies may produce a win-win situation. Entrepreneurial competencies can be of value when students are learning mathematics, and at the same time mathematics teaching can be organised so that students develop both mathematical and entrepreneurial competencies.

  • 10.
    Svensson, Gudrun
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Who owns the words?: Teaching vocabulary in a multicultural class2013In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 261-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing diversity of Swedish society is affecting the Swedish school. Applying the perspective of critical literacy (Janks 2010), this study examines how teachers’ attitudes in a multilingual classroom affect the ability of pupils to develop semantic and critically reflective competence. The study shows that the class teachers hardly considered the pupils’ multilingualism and cultural background when devising a procedure using literary tests to engage pupils in talking, listening and writing and to increase their lexical knowledge. With its one nation, one people and one language (May 1999), the Western cultural heritage seems to be taken for granted as natural. The teachers’ domination, the pupils’ powerlessness, and the lack of diversity do not give the pupils access to the learning that the teachers expect, and the pupils are not provided with an opportunity to develop critical-analytical thinking. The study also shows that the teachers feel inadequately trained for teaching in a society of diversity, and often experience powerlessness in their role as teachers, searching for good tools to guide their pupils.

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