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  • 1.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Visualism and technification - the patient behind the screen2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-6, article id 5223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At stake in this study is the patient's credibility. The Cartesian philosophical standpoint, which holds sway in western thinking, questions with scepticism whether the reported symptoms are “real.” Do they reside in the body, or are they mentally concocted. However, from the caring perspective any symptom must be both listened and attended to in its own right, not just scrutinized as evidence for an accurate diagnosis.

    In cognitively and emotionally complex high-tech units caregivers are juggling a precarious handful of cards. Technical tasks take precedence or have more urgency than caring behaviour. Assuming an irremediable tension between object–subject and care–cure in nursing is futile dualism. By addressing the essence of technology—the non-neutral and highly visual technology—this paper aims to find, from a philosophical point of view, a more comprehensive understanding for the dominance visualism and technification within intensive care.

    Screens give us access to vital signs. Screens record numbers and lines that relate to a graph and afford superfine spiked “readings.” However, the most relevant vital signs may be missing.

  • 2.
    Backåberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gummesson, Christina
    Lund University.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Is that really my movement?: Students’ experiences of a video-supported interactive learning model for movement awareness2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 28474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care staff and students have a great risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. One cause of this is heavy load-related work activities such as manual handling, in which the quality of individual work technique may play a major role. Preventive interventions and well-defined educational strategies to support movement awareness and long-lasting movement changes need to be developed. The aim of the present study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of a newly developed interactive learning model for movement awareness. The learning model, which is based on a life-world perspective with focus on inter-personal interaction, has been used with eleven undergraduate students from the second and final year. Each student participated in three individual video-sessions with a facilitator. Two individual interviews were carried out with each student during the learning process and one interview 12-18 months after the last session. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim and a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur and described by Lindseth & Norberg was used to interpret the interviews and diary notes. The interpretation resulted in three key themes and nine sub-themes. The key themes were; Obtaining better preconditions for bodily awareness, Experiencing changes in one’s own movement and Experiencing challenges in the learning process. The interactive learning model entails a powerful and challenging experience that develops movement awareness. The experience of meaningfulness and usefulness emerges increasingly and alternates with a feeling of discomfort. The learning model may contribute to the body of knowledge of well-defined educational strategies in movement awareness and learning in for example preventive interventions and ergonomic education. It may also be valuable in other practical learning situations where movement awareness is required.

  • 3.
    Brolin, Rosita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Striving for meaning: Life in supported housing for people with psychiatric disabilities2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a grounded theory about people with psychiatric disabilities, living in supported housing. Interviews as well as observations during the interviews were analyzed together with secondary analyses of quantitative and qualitative material from previous studies. Being deprived of self-determination emerged as the main concern for residents in supported housing and striving for meaning emerged as the pattern of behavior through which this group resolves their main concern. Striving for meaning involves living in the present, striving for self-determination, strengthening self-esteem, emotional processing and resting from the present. The strategies facilitate each other and are used singly, together simultaneously, or alternately. If they are successful, a meaning in the present is perceived. If all the strategies fail repeatedly, escaping from the present is used in order to deal with being deprived of self-determination. The implications of the findings suggest prioritizing a reduction of the institutional nature of the social and physical environment, and to support the residents' self-determination.

  • 4.
    Bylund, Ami
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Karolinska Institutet;Ersta Hospital.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Stabilizing family life after gastric bypass surgery2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1325674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weight-loss surgery requires lifelong lifestyle modifications for the maintenance of weight loss and health effects, and can affect both the individual and family. Earlier research indicates that the quality of social relationships has positive and negative influences on wellbeing and health. There is little research on family-life after a member has undergone gastric bypass (GBP) against obesity. Thus, this study aimed to develop a classic grounded theory about families with a member treated with GBP against obesity. The study design used classic grounded theory and included data from 16 interviews. Families’ shared a main concern of unexpected changes after GBP, resulting in the theory Stabilizing family life, explained as a social process to decrease uncertainty and find stability and well-being in family interactions. The social process develops differently which entail families: attaining unity, returning to old patterns, or disconnecting to find stability, depending on the discrepancy in expectations and knowledge. This is affected by the overall life situation, life-stage and relationship quality. The theory highlights unexpected change as a potential challenge for the family, as well as how they resolve this. Hence, the theory can be applied in care strategies for families. Identification of families needing support to stabilize family life after GBP requires further research.

  • 5.
    Dahlberg, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The question of meaning — a momentous issue for qualitative research2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-7, article id 1598723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we identify some worrying problems in the contemporary practice of qualitative research, such as the confusion regarding content and meaning in content analysis, the frequent use of standardized methods that avoids philosophy, as well as the description/interpretation dichotomy in empirical research. Since they all arise from a failure to understand the concept of meaning, we return to the question of meaning as the axis that qualitative research pivots around. We examine the meaning of meaning, and how meaning differs from content, and we then ask what consequences this has for research. Even though our analysis is rooted in phenomenological philosophy, we argue that that the ideas that we present are valid for any qualitative research approach. The question of understanding and relating to meaning, we argue, is a momentous issue for qualitative research, where we either continue safeguarding the very essence of qualitative research as dealing with human phenomena, or give it up in favor of more pragmatic and clear-cut methods that seemingly does away with the question of meaning.

  • 6.
    Dahlberg, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ecological caring-Revisiting the original ideas of caring science2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, p. 1-10, article id 33344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this empirically grounded philosophical paper is to explore the notion of holistic care with the intention to expand it into a notion of ecological care and in such a way revisit the original ideas of caring science. The philosophical analysis, driven by lifeworld theory and especially Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, is firmly rooted in contemporary clinical care. We used interview data from patients in a study at an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden, which forms part of an ecological community with, for example, ecological agriculture. The empirical study is analysed according to reflective lifeworld research. Starting from the fact that illness can be defined as a loss of homelikeness in the body and in the familiar world, our findings illustrate how ecological care helps the patient to once again find one's place in a world that is characterized by interconnectedness. The task of ecological care is thus not only to see the patient within a world of relationships but to help the patient find his/her place again, to understand himself/herself and the world anew. Ecological care is not only about fighting an illness, but also recognizes a patient from inside a world that s/he is affected by and affects, that s/he is understood and understands from. Such care tries to restore this connection by making possible the rhythmical movement as well as the space in-between activity and rest, between being cared for and actively involving oneself in one's recovery and between closing oneself off from the world and once again going out into it.

  • 7.
    Ehrlich, Kethy
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Emami, Azita
    Karolinska Institutet ; University of Washington, USA.
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    The relationship between geographical and social space and approaches to care among rural and urban caregivers caring for a family member with Dementia: a qualitative study2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-11, article id 1275107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about family caregivers in rural areas remains sparse. No studies to date have addressed the sociocultural aspects in caregiving, thus neglecting potentially significant data. This study aimed to explore and better understand family caregivers’ experiences in rural and urban areas and the sociocultural spheres that these two areas represent. How do family caregivers approach their caregiving situation? A hermeneutical approach was chosen to uncover the underlying meanings of experiences. Open-ended in-depth interviews were conducted. The ontological and epistemological roots are based on hermeneutic philosophy, where a human being’s existence is viewed as socially constructed. The study followed a purposeful sampling. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 rural and 11 urban family caregivers to persons with dementia. These were then analyzed in accordance with the hermeneutical process. The findings provide insight into the variations of family caregiver approaches to caregiving in rural and urban areas of Sweden. There seemed to be a prevalence of a more accepting and maintaining approach in the rural areas as compared to the urban areas, where caregiving was more often viewed as an obligation and something that limited one’s space. Differences in the construction of family identity seemed to influence the participants approach to family caregiving. Therefore, community-based caregiving for the elderly needs to become aware of how living within a family differs and how this affects their views on being a caregiver. Thus, support systems must be individually adjusted to each family’s lifestyles so that this is more in tune with their everyday lives.

  • 8.
    Enarsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Nord-Tröndelag University College, Norway.
    “Being good or evil”: applying a common staff approach when caring for patients with psychiatric disease2008In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    This study was performed to gain a deeper understanding of how psychiatric staff, when caring for patients with psychiatric disease, experience situations that include a common staff approach directed toward an individual client. Nine nurses were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenological-hermeneutic method in order to illuminate the livedexperience of applying a common staff approach. The results revealed several meanings: shedding light on carers’ mutual relationships; being deserted by nurse colleagues; being aware of one’s own basis of evaluation, and that of others; beingjudged by the patient as good or evil; and becoming sensitive to the patient’s suffering. The comprehensive understandingwas that the nurse has a difficult choice*to focus on relations with one’s colleagues or to focus on the situation of the patient, who seems to suffer when a common staff approach is used.

  • 9.
    Enarsson, Per
    et al.
    Katrineholm Municipality ; Umeå University.
    Sandman, PO
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Nord-Trøndelag University College, Norway.
    They can do whatever they want’’: Meanings of receiving psychiatric care based on a common staff approach2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deepens our understanding of how patients, when cared for in a psychiatric ward, experience situations that involve being handled according to a common staff approach. Interviews with nine former psychiatric in-patients were analyzed using a phenomenological–hermeneutic method to illuminate the lived experience of receiving care based on a common staff approach. The results revealed several meanings: discovering that you are as subjected to a common staff approach, becoming aware that no one cares, becoming aware that your freedom is restricted, being afflicted, becoming aware that a common staff approach is not applied by all staff, and feeling safe because someone else is responsible. The comprehensive understanding was that the patient's understanding of being cared for according to a common staff approach was to be seen and treated in accordance with others’ beliefs and valuations, not in line with the patients’ own self-image, while experiencing feelings of affliction.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Jeanette Källstrand
    et al.
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Buer, Nina
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Seniors' self-preservation by maintaining established self and defying deterioration - A grounded theory.2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, p. 1-9, article id 30265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this classic grounded theory study was to understand how seniors who are living independently resolve issues influenced by visual impairment and high fall risk. We interviewed and observed 13 seniors with visual impairment in their homes. We also interviewed six visual instructors with experience from many hundreds of relevant incidents from the same group of seniors. We found that the seniors are resolving their main concern of "remaining themselves as who they used to be" by self-preservation. Within this category, the strategies maintaining the established self and defying deterioration emerged as the most prominent in our data. The theme maintaining the established self is mostly guided by change inertia and includes living the past (retaining past activities, reminiscing, and keeping the home intact) and facading (hiding impairment, leading to avoidance of becoming a burden and to risk juggling). Defying deterioration is a proactive scheme and involves moving (by exercising, adapting activities, using walking aids, driving), adapting (by finding new ways), and networking by sustaining old support networks or finding new networks. Self-preservation is generic human behavior and modifying this theory to other fields may therefore be worthwhile. In addition, health care providers may have use for the theory in fall preventive planning.

  • 11.
    Holmberg, Mats
    et al.
    Sömland County Council.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Ersta Sköndal University College.
    The encounter with the unknown: nurses lived experiences of their responsibility for the care of the patient in the Swedish ambulance service2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses (RNs) have, according to the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, the overall responsibility for the medical care in the ambulance care setting. Bringing RNs into the ambulance service are judged, according to earlier studies, to lead to a degree of professionalism with a higher quality of medical care. Implicitly in earlier studies, the work in the ambulance service involves interpersonal skills. The aim of this study was to describe RNs' experiences of being responsible for the care of the patient in the Swedish ambulance service. A reflective lifeworld approach within the perspective of caring science was used. Five RNs with at least five years experience from care in the ambulance care setting were interviewed. The findings show that the essence of the phenomenon is to prepare and create conditions for care and to accomplish care close to the patient. Three meaning constituents emerged in the descriptions: prepare and create conditions for the nursing care, to be there for the patient and significant others and create comfort for the patient and significant others. The responsibility is a complex phenomenon, with a caring perspective, emerging from the encounter with the unique human being.

  • 12.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The learning space: interpersonal interactions between nursing students, patients, and supervisors at developing and learning care units2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1368337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous research shows that the learning space is significant for students’ learning in pairs in clinical practice but does not explain the meaning of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is thus to explain and understand the learning space that occurs in the interaction between the patients, the pairs of nursing students, and the supervisors on a developing and learning care unit in Sweden. 

    Method: The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on hermeneutics. A total of 39 informants, consisting of 16 patients, five pairs of students (10 students), and 13 supervisors, were observed and interviewed. 

    Results: The results reveal that an interpersonal linkage between the patients, the students, and the supervisors is created within the learning space. A learning space, based on respect towards each other, creates the prerequisite for beneficial and supportive interactions that contribute to a deeper relationship. 

    Conclusion: The phenomenon is complex due to its expandable nature and due to the fact that the learning space cannot be isolated from the surrounding environment. In order to exploit the potential of the learning space it is of importance to understand and consider the learning space as a whole.

  • 13.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Freelance Professor.
    Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline: Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 28703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault’s historical-philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-)caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault’s historical-philosophical work. The philosophical examination presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care.

  • 14.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Intertwining caring science, caring practice and caring education from a lifeworld perspective: two contextual examples2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 10363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes how caring science can be a helpful foundation for caring practice and what kind of learning supportthat can enable the transformation of caring science into practice. The lifeworld approach is fundamental for both caringand learning. This will be illustrated in two examples from research that show the potential for promoting health and wellbeingas well as the learning process. One example is from a caring context and the other is from a learning context. In thisarticle, learning and caring are understood as parallel processes. We emphasize that learning cannot be separated from lifeand thus caring and education is intertwined with caring science and life. The examples illustrate how an understanding ofthe intertwining can be fruitful in different contexts. The challenge is to implant a lifeworld-based approach on caring andlearning that can lead to strategies that in a more profound way have the potential to strengthen the person’s health andlearning processes.

  • 15.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg County Council.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University ; Uppsala University.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde.
    Manoeuvring between anxiety and control: Patients' experience of learning to live with diabetes : A lifeworld phenomenological study2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 27147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that people with diabetes want their lives to proceed as normally as possible, but some patients experience difficulty in reaching their desired goals with treatment. The learning process is a complex phenomenon interwoven into every facet of life. Patients and healthcare providers often have different perspectives in care which gives different expectations on what the patients need to learn and cope with. The aim of this study, therefore, is to describe the experience of learning to live with diabetes. Interviews were conducted with 12 patients afflicted with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were then analysed with reference to the reflective lifeworld research approach. The analysis shows that when the afflicted realize that their bodies undergo changes and that blood sugar levels are not always balanced as earlier in life, they can adjust to their new conditions early. The afflicted must take responsibility for balancing their blood sugar levels and incorporating the illness into their lives. Achieving such goals necessitates knowledge. The search for knowledge and sensitivity to changes are constant requirements for people with diabetes. Learning is driven by the tension caused by the need for and dependence on safe blood sugar control, the fear of losing such control, and the fear of future complications. The most important responsibilities for these patients are aspiring to understand their bodies as lived bodies, ensuring safety and security, and acquiring the knowledge essential to making conscious choices.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Kronoberg Cty Council, Dept Adm, Vaxjo, Sweden.;Reg Kronoberg Cty Council, Primary Care, Växjö.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Leksell, Janeth
    University of Dalarna ; Uppsala University.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde.
    Patients' experiences of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being: A lifeworld phenomenological study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 31330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning to live with diabetes in such a way that the new conditions will be a normal and natural part of life imposes requirements on the person living with diabetes. Previous studies have shown that there is no clear picture of what and how the learning that would allow persons to incorporate the illness into their everyday life will be supported. The aim of this study is to describe the phenomenon of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being, from the patient's perspective. Data were collected by interviews with patients living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were analysed using a reflective lifeworld approach. The results show that reflection plays a central role for patients with diabetes in achieving a new understanding of the health process, and awareness of their own responsibility was found to be the key factor for such a reflection. The constituents are responsibility creating curiosity and willpower, openness enabling support, technology verifying bodily feelings, a permissive climate providing for participation and exchanging experiences with others. The study concludes that the challenge for caregivers is to create interactions in an open learning climate that initiates and supports reflection to promote health and well-being.

  • 17.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work. Skaraborg Hospital.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    The meaning of well-being and participation in the process of health and care – Women’s experiences following a myocardial infarction2006In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 100-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the researchers explore women’s experiences of care and health process following a myocardial infarction(MI), with a particular focus on their experiences of well-being and participation. The phenomenon is illuminated from theapproach of reflective lifeworld research, and in order to obtain expressions of the women’s lived experiencephenomenological interviews were conducted. Participation and well-being are described as an experience of beinginvolved in one’s own health process. This entails that the women have the potential to influence and take responsibility fortheir own lives and their own bodies in a meaningful way for them. Participation is a condition for the women to deal withtheir health and their lives, and seems to improve the women’s sense of well-being. At the same time as they sense adependency on the health care professionals, they seek autonomy and a situation where they can find a new balance,including ‘‘the new’’ body and insecurity that the MI has brought with it. However, the findings also show that the women’sparticipation in the process of care and health, and their well-being, is a challenge for health care professionals. When theprofessionals are unable to encounter the women’s need of participation and desire to be met in their existential insecurity,well-being is affected.

  • 18.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Skövde.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Skövde.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The influence of living conditions on adolescent girls' health2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, article id 19059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is described by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare as the healthiest period in life. However, adolescent girls differ in that they self-report that their health decreases with age. The aim of this hermeneutical study was to describe the meaning of living conditions in relation to adolescent girls' health. Guided by principles of reflective lifeworld research, 15 interviews with adolescent girls were analysed. The result section consists of four narratives with their existential interpretations illustrating different ways of approaching living conditions and their meaning for health and wellbeing. The narratives are: Approaching everyday life in a balanced way-feeling harmonious; approaching everyday life with ambiguity-feeling confused; approaching everyday life as an intellectual project-striving for control; approaching everyday life as a struggle-feeling forlorn. In addition, a comprehensive understanding was developed by using the lifeworld dimensions: lived body, lived room, lived time, and lived relations. These dimensions may deepen the understanding of important parts of those living conditions which are meaningful for the girls' health and well-being. By using the dimensions, complex living conditions have been explored and the meaning of different parts clarified. The girls' thoughts and feelings are often ambiguous and sometimes contradictory, depending on the situation. The health of adolescent girls needs to be understood against the background of their experiences of living conditions. One way to support their health and well-being seems to be to supply them with forums where they can talk about their living conditions.

  • 19.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Methodological support for the further abstraction of and philosophical examination of empirical findings in the context of caring science2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenomena in caring science are often complex and laden with meanings. Empirical research with the aim of capturing lived experiences is one way of revealing the complexity. Sometimes, however, results from empirical research need to be further discussed. One way is to further abstract the result and/or philosophically examine it. This has previously been performed and presented in scientific journals and doctoral theses, contributing to a greater understanding of phenomena in caring science. Although the intentions in many of these publications are laudable, the lack of methodological descriptions as well as a theoretical and systematic foundation can contribute to an ambiguity concerning how the results have emerged during the analysis. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodological support for the further abstraction of and/orphilosophical examination of empirical findings. When trying to systematize the support procedures, we have used a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Based on the assumptions in RLR, this article will present methodological support for a theoretical examination that can include two stages. In the first stage, data from several (two or more) empirical results on an essential level are synthesized into a general structure. Sometimes the analysis ends with the general structure, but sometimes there is a need to proceed further. The second stage can then be a philosophical examination, in which the general structure is discussed in relation to a philosophical text, theory, or concept. It is important that the theories are brought in as the final stage after the completion of the analysis. Core dimensions of the described methodological support are, in accordance with RLR, openness, bridling, and reflection. The methodological support cannot be understood as fixed stages, but rather as a guiding light in the search for further meanings.

  • 20.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Persson, Eva I
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The importance of existential dimensions in the context of the presence of older patients at team meetings: In the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 26590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to explore interpersonal dimensions of the presence of older patients at team meetings.The theoretical foundation of the study is grounded in caring science and lifeworld phenomenology. The results from two empirical studies, that indicated the need for a more in-depth examination of the interpersonal relationships when an older patient is present at a team meeting, were further explicated by philosophical examination in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy. The empirical studies were performed in a hospital ward for older people, where the traditional rounds had been replaced by a team meeting, to which the patients were invited. The analysis of the general structure and philosophical examination followed the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The philosophical examination is presented in four meaning structures: mood as a force in existence; to exist in a world with others; loneliness in the presence of others;and the lived body as extending. In conclusion, professionals must consider patients’ existential issues in the way they are expressed by the patients. Existence extends beyond the present situation. Accordingly, the team meeting must be seen in a larger context, including the patients’ life as a whole, as well as the ontological and epistemological foundations on which healthcare is based.

  • 21.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Persson, Eva I
    Lund university, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    ‘‘It made me feel human’’: a phenomenological study of older patients’ experiences of participating in a team meeting2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, no Article number: 20714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on older patients participating in a team meeting (TM) in a hospital ward in Sweden. A process had taken place on the ward, in which the traditional round had developed into a TM and understanding what participating in a TM means for the older patient is necessary for the development of care that facilitates older patient’s participation. The aim of this study was to describe the caring, as experienced by the older patients on a ward for older persons, with a specific focus on the team meeting. A reflective lifeworld research (RLR) design was used. Fifteen patients, 12 women and three men (mean age of 82 years) were interviewed while they were hospitalized in a hospital ward for older people. In the essential meaning of the phenomenon, the TM is described as being a part of a wider context of both caring and life. The need for hospitalization is an emotional struggle to overcome vulnerability and regain everyday freedom. The way in which the professionals are able to confirm vulnerability and create a caring relationship affects both the struggle for well-being and the possibilities for maintaining dignity. The essence is further explicated through its constituents; Vulnerability limits life; Life is left in the hands of someone else; Life is a whole and Space for existence. The result raises concern about how the care needs to be adjusted to older people’s needs as lived bodies. The encounter between the carer and the patient needs to be developed in order to get away from the view of the patient as object. An expanded vision may open up for existential dimensions of what brings meaning to life. One way, as described by the patients, is via the patient’s life stories, through which the patients can be seen as a whole human being.

  • 22.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Persson, Eva I.
    University of Borås, Sweden;Lund University, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Older patients’ participation in team meeting: A phenomenological study from the nurses’ perspective2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, article id 21908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the importance of patient participation is acknowledged in today’s healthcare, many challenges remain beforepatient participation can become an integral part of care provision. The ward round has traditionally been the forum forcrucial decisions about patient care, but often with limited possibilities for patient participation. As part of the process ofimproving patient participation, the round in the present study has been replaced by a team meeting (TM) to which thepatient has been invited. The aim of this study is to highlight nurses’ experiences of older patients’ participation in TMs.The research process was guided by the principles of phenomenological reflective life world research. Data were collected in a Swedish hospital, in a ward specializing in older patients. Nine nurses, who had invited and planned for a patient toparticipate in TMs and/or had experienced TMs in which patients participated, were interviewed. The essential meaning ofpatient participation in the TM, as experienced by the nurses, is that patient participation can be supported by a saferelationship in which the patient can make his or her voice heard. Participation is challenged by the patients’ vulnerability and by the subordinated role assigned to the patient. The essential meaning is further described by its constituents: ‘‘the need for a guide,’’ ‘‘patient participation challenged by structures,’’ and ‘‘creating space for the whole human being.’’ In conclusion, the nurse plays a core role in guiding the patient in an unfamiliar situation. The meaning of patient participationin the TM needs to be discussed by professionals so that the patient perspective is present.

  • 23.
    Lundvall, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lost in an unknown terrain: a phenomenological contribution to the understanding of existential concerns as experienced by young women in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-11, article id 1658843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe young women’s (16–25 years old) experiences of living with existential concerns for which they have sought support from healthcare professionals, teachers, family, or friends, among others.

    Methods: This phenomenological study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Nine young women were interviewed about their experience of living with existential concerns.

    Results: The results show the essential meaning of the phenomenon of “existential concerns” that can be described as living a life that is marked in a profound way by a feeling of being lost in an unknown terrain. To further understand the essential meaning, four constituents are described: the unpredictable body, longing for comprehension, playing a game, and longing to share one’s vulnerability.

    Conclusions: Young women with existential concerns are vulnerable, as they are profoundly influenced by these concerns. They have to navigate through daily life while trying to fit in and to make their situation comprehensible. These young women have a longing to share their existential concerns with a trustworthy person, while at the same time they fear revealing their existential concerns and risking being rejected by others. A lifeworld-led, caring science approach, intertwined with the results of the present study, has the potential to direct caring practice.

  • 24.
    Manasatchakun, Pornpun
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Chotiga, Pleumjit
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Mälardalen University.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University.
    Healthy Ageing in Isan-Thai culture: A phenomenographic study based on older persons' lived experiences2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 29463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy ageing is a concept that concerns older persons’ quality of life and is a key factor in promoting wellbeing. The older population in Thailand is growing. Isan (a region of north-eastern Thailand) has been reported as having one of the most rapidly increasing older populations in the country. In order to care for and promote the health of older people, healthcare providers should understand how healthy ageing is perceived by this target group. Although healthy ageing has been studied in different contexts as well as perspectives,no studies have previously focused on older persons’ experiences of healthy ageing from a life world perspective in Isan-Thai. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe older persons’ qualitatively different conceptions of healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture. A phenomenographic approach with an epistemological base in lifeworld theory was used to disclose the various ways to conceptualize healthy ageing. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 older people aged 60 and above who live in Isan-Thai. The findings of this study revealed three categories of descriptions: “being independent in dependence”, “being at peace”, and “being a valuable person”. This study also found family members, friends, healthcare providers, and religion important to healthy ageing in the Isan-Thai culture. Understanding how older people conceptualize healthy aging is valuable for healthcare providers. They can apply these findings regarding healthy ageing in their fieldwork when caring for older people.

  • 25.
    Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Asp, Margareta
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Safety and understanding: Support as experienced by women living with heart failure in middle age2008In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 39-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reformulate and adjust to their life-situation, women living with heart failure (HF) need help and support. However, the actual meaning of the phenomenon of support is not yet well described. The aim of the study was to uncover the meaning of the phenomenon of support as experienced by women living with HF in middle age. A reflective lifeworld approach within the perspective of caring science was used. Six women (aged 33–61 years) were interviewed. The findings show that the essence of support can be understood as safety, depicted by understanding. However, there is tension between what is supportive and what is not, meaning that even though intentions are good, intended support may involve limitations, uncertainties or insecurity. The meaning of support is further illuminated in the following constituents: “knowledge and understanding”, “finding balance”, “ambiguity of relationships” and “support and formal care—a matter of trust and mistrust”. Findings demonstrate the need for carers to find an approach that ensures both good quality medical care and, at the same time, acknowledges the uniqueness of each individual.

  • 26.
    Ohlen, Joakim
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College ; Ersta Hospital ; University of Gothenburg.
    Ekman, Inger
    University of Gothenburg.
    Zingmark, Karin
    Norrbotten County Council ; Luleå University of Technology.
    Bolmsjö, Ingrid
    Malmö University.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Conceptual development of "at-homeness'' despite illness and disease: A review2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, article id 23677Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Only one empirical study, the one by Zingmark, Norberg and Sandman published in 1995, explicitly focuses on at-homeness, the feeling of being metaphorically at-home, as a particular aspect of wellness. However, other studies reveal aspects of at-homeness, but if or how such aspects of at-homeness are related to each other is unclear. For this reason, the aim was to review Scandinavian nursing research related to at-homeness in the context of wellness-illness in severe and long-term conditions in order to take a step towards conceptual clarification of "at-homeness.'' The review included interpretive studies related to severe and long-term illness conducted in Sweden: 10 original articles and 5 doctoral theses. "At-homeness'' was found to be a contextually related meaning of wellness despite illness and disease embedded in the continuum of being metaphorically at-home and metaphorically homeless. This was characterized by three interrelated aspects and four processes: being safe through expanding-limiting experiences of illness and time, being connected through reunifying-detaching ways of relating, and being centred through recognition-non-recognition of oneself in the experience and others giving-withdrawing a place for oneself. This conceptualization is to be regarded as a step in conceptual clarification. Further empirical investigation and theoretical development of "at-homeness'' are needed. The conceptualization will be a step of plausible significance for the evaluation of interventions aimed at enhancing wellness for people with severe long-term illness, such as the frail elderly, and people with chronic illness or palliative care needs.

  • 27.
    Palmér, Lina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Mollberg, Margareta
    University of Borås, Sweden;University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Severe breastfeeding difficulties: Existential lostness as a mother - Women’s lived experiences of initiating breastfeeding under severe difficulties2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, article id 10846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A majority of women in Sweden initiate breastfeeding but almost a quarter stop or wean the infant in the first few weeks

    after birth because of difficulties. In order to develop care that facilitates initiation of breastfeeding and enables mothers

    to realize their expectations concerning breastfeeding, it is necessary to understand what having severe breastfeeding

    difficulties means for women who experience them. The aim of this study is to describe the lived experiences of initiating

    breastfeeding under severe difficulties. A reflective lifeworld research design was used. Eight women, seven primiparous

    and one multipara, were interviewed within 2 months of giving birth. The essential meaning of the phenomenon is

    described as ‘‘Existential lostness as a mother forcing oneself into a constant fight’’. This pattern is further explicated through its

    constituents; shattered expectations, a lost time for closeness, being of no use to the infant, being forced to expose oneself,

    and gaining strength through sharing. The results show that mothers with severe breastfeeding difficulties feel alone

    and exposed because of their suffering and are lost in motherhood. Thus, adequate care for mothers should enhance the

    forming of a caring relationship through sharing rather than exposing.

  • 28.
    Qvistgaard, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lovebo, Jenny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Intraoperative prevention of Surgical Site Infections as experienced by operating room nurses2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 1632109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study examines how OR nurses experience intraoperative prevention of SSIs. Introduction: Infections related to surgical procedures create both great patient suffering and high costs for society. Therefore, prevention of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) should be a high priority for all surgical settings. All details of intraoperative care need to be investigated and evaluated to ensure best practices are evidence-based. Methods: This study uses the Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach, which is grounded in phenomenology. Participants were OR nurses with at least one year of clinical experience. In total, 15 participants from seven hospitals made contact and were included in this interview study. Results: Prevention of SSIs takes both head and hand. It requires long-term, continuous, and systematic work in several parallel processes, both intellectually and organisationally. The hierarchical tradition of the operating room is often ambiguous, shielded by its safe structures but still restricted by traditional patterns. Confident relations and resolute communication within the team generate favorable conditions for preventing SSIs. Conclusions: By setting up mutual platforms and forums for quality development, increasing legitimacy for OR nurses and establishing fixed teams, prevention of SSIs will continue to improve, ensuring the patients' safety during intraoperative care.

  • 29.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Stolt, Carl-Magnus
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work. School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    In the midst of the unthinkable: A phenomenological life-world approach to the experiences of suffering and relieved suffering during the tsunami catastrophe, 2004.2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to highlight the instantaneous experience of suffering and relieved suffering that was presented on the Swedish Television (SVT) by those who experienced the tsunami wave in Thailand, 26 December 2004. The selected TV-interviews were watched, transcribed and conducted with an empirical phenomenological analysis. A phenomenological lifeworld approach, inspired by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, was chosen for the theoretical framework.The findings showed three main features: the motion, the stillnessandthe shift in perspective. The motion comprised both the motion of the wave and the motion it caused the victims in terms of external as well as internal disorder. When the tsunami waves withdrew, it was followed by stillness. The feeling of being unreal was prominent, triggered by lack of information and endless waiting. Another prominent feature was the victims’ incapacity to answer ‘‘how long’’ they had suffered before being rescued. The tsunami catastrophe seemed to be a timeless event. Caring for other victims meant a shift in perspective in one’s own devastated world to that of another person. The shift between focus and comprehension, contributed to the making of life-saving decisions, for the victims themselves and for other victims. The findings were mainly reflected on from the perspective of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, for example the experience of time as an embedded and lived now. It was also reflected on from the perspective of the German philosopher Karl Jaspers as a limit-experience and as a fulfilment of love. A suggestion for further research is to investigate how suffering and relieved suffering is experienced and encountered when further time has passed.

    Key words:Tsunami, catastrophe, suffering, relieved suffering, care, phenomenology, lifeworld

  • 30.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. University College of Haraldsplass, Norway.
    Sameby, Jessica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brodin, Sandra
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. Jönköping University.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar Theological Seminary, Norway.
    Out of the wave: The meaning of suffering and relief from suffering as described in autobiographies by survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 5323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of suffering and relief from suffering as described in autobiographies by tourists who experienced the tsunami on 26 December 2004 and lost loved ones. A lifeworld approach, inspired by the French philosopher Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception, was chosen for the theoretical framework. This catastrophe totally changed the survivors' world within a moment. In this new world, there were three main phases: the power of remaining focused, a life of despair, and the unbearable becoming bearable. Life turns into a matter of making the unbearable bearable. Such challenging experiences are discussed in terms of the philosophy of Weil, Jaspers, and Merleau-Ponty. The survivors of the tsunami catastrophe were facing a boundary situation and "le malheur," the unthinkable misfortune. Even at this lowest level of misfortune, joy is possible to experience. This is part of the survivors' ambivalent experiences of their lifeworld. In this world of the uttermost despair there are also rays of hope, joy, and new life possibilities.

  • 31.
    Rusner, Marie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    A dependence that empowers - the meaning of the conditions that enable a good life with bipolar disorder2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 4653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extensive suffering related to a complex life situation with bipolar disorder and the reported difference between care needs and the needs that are actually met implicates that there are still questions about management of life with bipolar disorder that need to be answered. The present study therefore aims to describe the meaning of the conditions that enable a good life with bipolar disorder. Ten persons, six women and four men, (aged 30 – 61), diagnosed with bipolar disorder were interviewed. A reflective lifeworld perspective based on phenomenological philosophy was used. The findings present the essential meaning of the conditions that enable a good life with bipolar disorder as a dependence that empowers, which is further described by its constituents: “turning the course of life”, “protecting oneself from running out of energy”, “being needed”, “being oneself through reliable others”, “personal landmarks for navigating through life”. A voluntary chosen dependence, as described in the present study, is a new approach of care that enables a good life with bipolar disorder, while enhancing own power, freedom and control. The conditions that enable a good life with bipolar disorder are more than separate supporting measures. Therefore a holistic perspective is preferable while providing care for individuals with bipolar disorder.

  • 32.
    Rusner, Marie
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Gunilla, Carlsson
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Extra dimensions in all aspects of life - the meaning of life with Bipolar Disorder2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living with Bipolar Disorder (BD) greatly affects the whole life; still the meaning of it is poorly explored from the perspective of the individuals actually living with it. The aim of this study is thus to explore the existential meaning of life with BD. Ten persons, six women and four men, (aged 30 – 61), diagnosed with BD were interviewed. A reflective lifeworld perspective based on phenomenological philosophy was used. The findings show that living with BD entails experiencing extra dimensions in all aspects of life, expressed in terms of a magnitude and complexity beyond that which is perceived as pertaining to normal life. The essential meaning of the phenomenon is further described by its constituents: “a specific intensity”, “a struggle to understand”, “an illness that is intertwined with one’s whole being”. Living with BD means more for the individual than having episodes of depression and mania and must therefore be understood from a holistic perspective. Adequate care for persons with BD therefore includes places for safe and profound reflecting about existential issues, such as identity, trust and self-confidence. The present study recommends the caring services to change their ways to explain and talk about the BD illness.

  • 33.
    Rydeman, Ingbritt
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tornkvist, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Being in-between and lost in the discharge process: An excursus of two empirical studies of older persons', their relatives', and care professionals' experience2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, article id 19678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discharge process (DP) is full of well-known risks, and a comprehensive and well-executed DP is especially important for older people with multiple health problems and continuing care needs, as well as for their relatives. Few studies focus on the experiences with the DP by older people in need of home care nursing and their relatives. Therefore, the aim was to deepen the understanding of the DP as a phenomenon described by older people, their relatives, and care professionals. The method is an excursus of the findings of two previously published research studies. By using the Reflective Lifeworld Research approach, the empirical findings were further interpreted with lifeworld theory. The results describe the essential meaning of the phenomenon of DP in relation to healthcare needs. The illness and the DP can be viewed as a course of action where the familiar becomes unfamiliar for older people and their relatives, entailing an insecure future existence characterized by the experience of being in-between. The DP is marked by bodily and existential needs. The older persons and their relatives are lost in the hospital context and trying to influence life and adapt to life circumstances, while being relentlessly dependent on care professionals. Care professionals work from both an organizational and a medical approach. Disharmony and disagreement seem to arise easily among the professionals regarding the planning negatively affecting the patients and their relatives. More efforts are needed in the DP to empower older people and their relatives to go on with their life at home. The caring practice needs to more clearly meet and address the individual needs of older people and their relatives and their understanding of their illness. It needs to give them lifeworld and life goals to alleviate their suffering and to help them adjust to their new situation.

  • 34.
    Sanden, Ulrika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Fredrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. Research & Development Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Uppsala University, Sweden;Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harrysson, Lars
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Cancer, a relational disease exploring the needs of relatives to cancer patients2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1622354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In this qualitative interview study we investigated the experiences of family members to cancer patients. Our objective was to explore and to differentiate their needs from the needs of cancer patients. Methods: Five focus groups and six individual narrative interviews with 17 family members to cancer patients in Sweden were conducted and compared with 19 cancer patient interviews. Our analysis was inspired by classic grounded theory. Results: Family members to cancer patients expressed own morbidity connected to high stress levels and difficulties in recognizing own stress due to ongoing comparisons with the cancer patient. Family members were trapped in a momentary terror-like situation where they became their sick relative's safety net. A percieved inability to improve their loved one's well being contributed to a feeling of guilt. The longing for it all to end was encumbered with shame since the end included possible death. Conclusions: By recognizing cancer as a disease striking both body and relationships, family members are given precedence over their own struggles, differentiated from the patient's experiences. We define differences in needs between cancer patients and family members. Family members to cancer patients may be supported in developing balancing strategies towards less stress, increased safety and moments of contentment.

  • 35.
    Sandgren, Anna
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work. University of Gothenburg;Kronoberg County Research Centre.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Kronoberg County Research Centre.
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Kronoberg County Research Centre.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work. University of Gothenburg.
    "Doing good care" - a study of palliative home nursing care2007In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 2, p. 227-235, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, more and more people die in own homes and nursing homes, which fundamentally affects community nursing. The aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory of palliative home nursing care and we analysed interviews and data related to the behavior of community nurses caring for palliative cancer patients. Doing Good Care emerged as the pattern of behavior through which nurses deal with their main concern, their desire to do good. The theory Doing Good Care involves three caring behaviors; Anticipatory caringMomentary caring and Stagnated caring. In Anticipatory caring, which is the optimal caring behavior, nurses are doing their best or even better than necessary, in Momentary caring nurses are doing best momentarily and in Stagnated caring nurses are doing good but from the perspective of what is expected of them. When nurses fail in doing good, they experience a feeling of letting the patient down, which can lead to frustration and feelings of powerlessness. Depending on the circumstances, nurses can hover between the three different caring behaviors. We suggest that healthcare providers increase the status of palliative care and facilitate for nurses to give Anticipatory care by providing adequate resources and recognition.

  • 36.
    Sandén, Ulrika
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Harrysson, Lars
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Fredrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Exploring health navigating design: momentary contentment in a cancer context.2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-12, article id 1374809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The technocratic and medicalized model of healthcare is rarely optimal for patients. By connecting two different studies we explore the possibilities of increasing quality of life in cancer care.

    METHODS: The first study captures survival strategies in a historically isolated Arctic village in Norway resulting in Momentary contentment theory, which emerged from analysing four years of participant observation and interview data. The second study conceptualizes everyday life of cancer patients based on in-depth interviews with 19 cancer patients; this was conceptualized as Navigating a new life situation. Both studies used classic grounded theory methodology. The connection between the studies is based on a health design approach.

    RESULTS: We found a fit between cancer patients challenging life conditions and harsh everyday life in an Arctic village. Death, treatments and dependence have become natural parts of life where the importance of creating spaces-of-moments and a Sense of Safety is imminent to well-being. While the cancer patients are in a new life situation, the Arctic people show a natural ability to handle uncertainties.

    CONCLUSION: By innovation theories connected to design thinking, Momentary contentment theory modified to fit cancer care would eventually be a way to improve cancer patients' quality of life.

  • 37.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Umans, Timurs
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Experiences of well-being among female doctoral students in Sweden2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, no 23059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how female PhD students experience and perceive their well-being. Focus groups were conducted with female PhD students employed at a Swedish university. The study was performed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach based on the concept of the lifeworld, used as both a philosophical perspective and a methodology. Three main themes emerged from the analysis: being true to oneself, being in the sphere of influence, and performing a balancing act. By unfolding these themes, the study shows that perceptions and experiences of well-being in female PhD students are a multifaceted phenomenon and materialize through interaction of different aspects of ‘‘self ’’ (agent) and ‘‘others’’ (structure). As well as illustrating these perceptions and experiences, the study also presents female PhD students’ conceptualization of their well-being, expressed in terms of a white-water rafting metaphor.

  • 38.
    Svensson, Jonas
    Department of Humanities, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    HIV/AIDS and Islamic religious education in Kisumu, Kenya2007In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 179-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe and critically discuss the discourse on HIV/AIDS within the framework of Islamic Religious Education (IRE) in Kisumu, Kenya. It is based on data collected mainly through participant observation and interviews during five fieldwork sessions in the period 2003-2006. The context is the research project Islamic education and social development in Kisumu, Kenya, financed by the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA). The article describes how the issue of HIV/AIDS is present in the context of IRE, mainly in secondary schools in Kisumu, an area heavily affected by the pandemic. The framework in which teachers and students address the issue is one conditioned by notions of religiously correct and incorrect sexual behaviour and gender, and by the fact that Muslims constitute a religious minority in Kisumu. The article argues that the main role of the local discourse on HIV/AIDS and Islam in the context of IRE is to strengthen notions of religious and moral superiority, and hence boost the self-esteem of the Muslim students. Furthermore, it provides support for dominant views and norms relating to Islam, gender and sexuality.

  • 39.
    Waxegård, Gustaf
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Region Kronoberg, Sweden;Lund University, Sweden.
    Integrating care for neurodevelopmental disorders by unpacking control: A grounded theory study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To establish integrated healthcare pathways for patients with neurodevelopmental disorders ( ND) such as autism spectrum disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is challenging. This study sets out to investigate the main concerns for healthcare professionals when integrating ND care pathways and how they resolve these concerns. Methods: Using classic grounded theory ( Glaser), we analysed efforts to improve and integrate an ND care pathway for children and youth in a Swedish region over a period of 6 years. Data from 42 individual interviews with a range of ND professionals, nine group interviews with healthcare teams, participant observation, a 2-day dialogue conference, focus group meetings, regional media coverage, and reports from other Swedish regional ND projects were analysed. Results: The main concern for participants was to deal with overwhelming ND complexity by unpacking control, which is control over strategies to define patients' status and needs. Unpacking control is key to the professionals' strivings to expand constructive life space for patients, to squeeze health care to reach available care goals, to promote professional ideologies, and to uphold workplace integrity. Control-seeking behaviour in relation to ND unpacking is ubiquitous and complicates integration of ND care pathways. Conclusions: The Unpacking control theory expands central aspects of professions theory and may help to improve ND care development.

  • 40.
    Årestedt, Liselott
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Persson, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University.
    A shared respite: The meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living with chronic illness is a family affair that involves ongoing changes and challenges in everyday life. When life changes, the environment is important for family health and well-being. The relation between a place and a family is rarely described, and therefore the aim of this study was to explore the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness. A qualitative design was chosen. Data were collected by photovoice combined with narrative family research interviews with 10 families living with chronic illness. A phenomenological hermeneutic analysis was used to interpret the data. The results showed that the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness can be described as "a shared respite.'' This main theme included three subthemes: "a place for relief,'' "a place for reflection,'' and "a place for re-creation.'' These results were further understood by means of the concept place security. Feeling well means having place security in these families. Through knowledge about the meaning of place for family well-being, health care personnel can stimulate families living with chronic illness to find respite in places that contribute to well-being, both in familiar and new places.

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