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  • 1.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ukrainian-speaking migrants’ concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare service: a pilot study2016In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 10, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate Ukrainian-speaking migrants’ attitudes to the use of interpreters in healthcare service in order to test a developed questionnaire and recruitment strategy. A descriptive survey using a 51-item structured selfadministered questionnaire of 12 Ukrainian-speaking migrants’ and analyzed by the descriptive statistics. The findings were to have an interpreter as an objective communication and practical aid with personal qualities such as a good knowledge of languages and translation ability. In contrast, the clothes worn by the interpreter and the interpreter’s religion were not viewed as important aspects. The findings support the method of a developed questionnaire and recruitment strategy, which in turn can be used in a larger planned investigation of the same topic in order to arrange a good interpretation situation in accordance with persons’ desire irrespective of countries’ different rules in healthcare policies regarding interpretation. © 2016, Emina Hadziabdic; Licensee Bentham Open.

  • 2.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bard, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Beliefs about health and illness in Latin-American migrants with diabetes living in Sweden2013In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, p. 57-65, article id TONURSJ-7-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study explored beliefs about health and illness in Latin American migrants diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM) living in Sweden, and investigated the influence on health-related behavior including self-care and care-seeking behavior. Migrants are particularly affected in the diabetes pandemia. Beliefs about health and illness determine health-related behaviour and health but no studies have been found on Latin American migrants with DM. An explorative study design with focus-group interviews of nine persons aged 36-77 years from a diabetes clinic was used. Health was described from a pathogenetic or a salutogenetic perspective: 'freedom from disease or feeling of well-being', and being autonomous and able to work. Economic hardship due to expenses for medications and food for DM affected health. Individual factors such as diet, exercise and compliance with advice, and social factors with good social relations and avoidance of stress, often caused by having experienced severe events related to migrational experiences, were considered important for maintaining health and could cause DM. Disturbed relations to others (social factors), punishment by God or Fate (supernatural factors), intake of diuretics and imbalance between warmth and cold (natural factors) were also perceived as causes. A mix of biomedical and traditional explanations and active self-care behaviour with frequent use of herbs was found. It is important to assess the individual's beliefs, and health professionals, particularly nurses, should incorporate discussions of alternative treatments and other components of explanatory models and co-operate with social workers to consider influence of finances and migrational experiences on health.

  • 3.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Linköping University.
    Beebwa, Esther
    Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Uganda.
    The influence of beliefs about health and illness on foot care in ugandan persons with diabetic foot ulcers2013In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 123-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetes mellitus is becoming pandemic, particularly affecting Sub-Saharan Africa, and the prevalence of complications is increasing. Diabetic foot disorders are a major source of morbidity and disability. Delay in the health care process due to patients' beliefs may have deleterious consequences for limb and life in persons with diabetic foot ulcers. No previous studies of beliefs about health and illness in persons with diabetic foot ulcers living in Africa have been found. The aim of the study was to explore beliefs about health and illness among Ugandans with diabetic foot ulcers that might affect self-care and care seeking behavior. In an explorative study with consecutive sample semi-structured interviews were held with 14 Ugandan men and women, aged 40-79, with diabetic foot ulcer. Knowledge was limited about causes, management and prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. Foot ulcers were often detected as painful sores, perceived to heal or improve, and led to stress and social isolation due to smell and reduced mobility. Most lacked awareness of the importance of complete daily foot care and seldom practiced self-care. Health was described as absence of disease and pain. Many feared future health and related it to contact with nurses in the professional sector from whom they sought information, blood tests and wound dressings and desired better organised diabetes clinics offering health education and more opening hours. Many have an under utilized potential for self-care and need education urgently, delivered in well-organised diabetes clinics working to raise awareness of the threat and prevent foot ulcers.

  • 4.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    County Hospital, Ryhov.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Beliefs about health, health risks and health expectations from the perspective of people with a psychotic disorder2013In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 114-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine beliefs about health, health risks and health expectations from the perspective of people diagnosed with a psychotic disorder Background: People with psychotic disorders have a threefold higher risk of developing physical health problems than the general population, and prevention of these problems is warranted. Examining patientś health beliefs could help deepen our understanding of how to plan successful health interventions with this group.Methods: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted from November 2010 to October 2011 with 17 people with psychotic disorders. Data were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis.Results: An overall positive picture of health was found despite the fact that physical health was found to be hard to verbalize and understand. Health was mainly associated with psychological wellbeing, while health risks were found to be related to uncertain bodily identity, troublesome thoughts and inner voices, and exclusion from society. Interest in learning, and visions and goals of health seemed to increase awareness of health risks and health expectations, while not worrying could be viewed as a hindrance for health expectations.Conclusion: There is a lack of expressed awareness of physical health risks, but such awareness is fundamental to performing life-style changes [14]. Nurses thus have an important task to help patients understand and verbalize potential physical health risks, and to find out what motivates them to adopt health behaviors.

  • 5.
    Mufunda, Esther
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Albin, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Differences in health and illness beliefs in Zimbabwean men and women with diabetes (Open Access)2012In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 6, p. 117-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored beliefs about health and illness that might affect self-care and health-seeking behaviours in Zimbabwean men and women with diabetes. Gender differences were indicated in a previous study but their extent has not been studied. The present study used a qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews to gain a deeper understanding of the phenomena. The sample consisted of 21 participants, 11 females aged 19-61 years (Median 44 years) and 10 males aged 22-65 years (Median 52 years). Qualitative content analysis was used. Health was described as freedom from diseases and enjoying well-being. Both males and females displayed limited knowledge about diabetes and dissimilarities in health-seeking behaviours. Women, in contrast to men, were more active in self-care and used various measures besides drugs as they related to a higher extent the cause of diabetes to supernatural factors like gods and witches. They sought information from self-help groups and help from outside the professional health sector like healers in the folk sector. Prolonged economic disruption also had negative effects towards maintenance of healthy life-styles as both men and women struggled to get money for food and drugs. Thus, the study highlighted that knowledge about diabetes and its management are important for self-care. There is therefore need to develop acceptable and affordable gender- sensitive diabetes care programmes that enhance patient participation, empowerment and promotion of health

  • 6.
    Nielsen, Elinor
    et al.
    Vrinnevi Hospital Norrköping, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Ingrid
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Evaluating Pictures of Nature and Soft Music on Anxiety and Well-Being During Elective Surgery2018In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 12, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients going through surgery being awake often have a sense of anxiety and need support to relax.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether looking at pictures of natural scenery could reduce anxiety and pain and increase relaxation and well-being being awake during the elective surgery.

    Methods: This three-arm, randomized intervention study consisted of one group viewing pictures of natural scenery, one group listening to soft instrumental music, and one control group without distraction, all adult patients (n=174). The State Trait Anxiety Inventory short form and a visual analogue scale on well-being were used as well as sedation treatment if necessary.

    Results: No differences related to anxiety after surgery were found among the three groups. When controlling for the effect of sedative treatment, however, patients without sedation had a lower degree of anxiety postoperatively (p=0.014). Younger patients had a higher degree of anxiety and lower degree of postoperative relaxation and well-being.

    Conclusion: Viewing pictures of natural scenery while being awake during elective surgery is as relaxing as listening to soft instrumental music. Offering nature scenery pictures for patients to view could be relaxing during the elective surgery.

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