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  • 1.
    Brolin, Rosita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mastering everyday life in ordinary housing for people with psychiatric disabilities2016In: The Grounded Theory Review, ISSN 1556-1542, E-ISSN 1556-1550, Vol. 15, no 1, 10-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory about people who have psychiatric disabilities and live in ordinary housing with housing support. Interviews and observations during the interviews were analyzed, and secondary analyses of data from previous studies were performed. The impossible mission in everyday life emerged as the main concern and mastering everyday life as the pattern of behavior through which they deal with this concern. Mastering everyday life can be seen as a process, which involves identifying, organizing, tackling, challenging and boosting. Before the process is started, avoiding is used to deal with the main concern. The community support worker, providing housing support, constitutes an important facilitator during the process, and the continuity of housing support is a prerequisite for the process to succeed. If the process mastering everyday life is interrupted by, for example, changes in housing support, the strategy of avoiding is used.

  • 2.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Deciphering unwritten rules2012In: The Grounded Theory Review, ISSN 1556-1542, E-ISSN 1556-1550, Vol. 11, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory of patients, relatives and nurses in palliative cancer care. Data from three earlier studies conducted in palliative care were analyzed. “Deciphering unwritten rules” emerged as the pattern of behavior through which patients, relatives and nurses are dealing with the uncertainty of how to act and behave in palliative cancer care. Deciphering means finding out what the rules mean and trying to interpret them and this can be done consciously or unnoticed. Deciphering unwritten rules involves the strategies figuring out, deliberating, maneuvering and evaluating. This theory demonstrates the complexities of palliative care and the importance of knowledge, counseling and resources for all involved.

  • 3.
    Sandgren, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Kronoberg County Research Center.
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Kronoberg County Research Center.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. Jönköping University.
    Living on hold in palliative cancer care2010In: The Grounded Theory Review, ISSN 1556-1542, E-ISSN 1556-1550, Vol. 9, no 1, 79-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory of palliative cancer patients and their relatives in the context of home care. We analyzed interviews and data related to the behaviour of both patients and relatives. “Living on hold” emerged as the pattern of behaviour through which the patients and relatives deal with their main concern, being put on hold. Living on Hold involves three modes: Fighting, Adjusting and Surrendering. Mode being may change during a trajectory depending on many different factors. There are also different triggers that can start a reconciling process leading to a change of mode. This means that patients and relatives can either be in the same mode or in different modes simultaneously. More or less synchronous modes may lead to problems and conflicts within the family, or with the health professionals.

  • 4.
    Waxegård, Gustaf
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Region of Kronoberg.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Lund University.
    Trust Testing in Care Pathways for Neurodevelopmental Disorders: A Grounded Theory Study2016In: The Grounded Theory Review, ISSN 1556-1542, E-ISSN 1556-1550, Vol. 15, no 1, 45-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building care pathways for the expansive, heterogeneous, and complex field of neurodevelopmental disorders (ND) is challenging. This classic grounded theory study conceptualizes problems encountered and resolved by professionals in the unpacking— diagnosis and work up—of ND. A care pathway for ND in children and adolescents was observed for six years. Data include interviews, documentation of a dialogue-conference devoted to the ND care pathway, 100+ hours of participant observations, and coding of stakeholder actions. Trust testing explores whether professional unpacking collaboration can occur without being “stuck with the buck” and if other professionals can be approached to solve own unpacking priorities. ND complexity, scarce resources, and diverging stakeholder interests undermine the ability to make selfless collaborative professional choices in the care pathway. ND professionals and managers should pay as much attention to trust issues as they do to structures and patient flows. The trust testing theory may improve the understanding of ND care pathways further as a modified social dilemma framework. 

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