lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    On unfolding present and past (rock art) worldings2019In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is set out to unfold present and past (rock art) ontologies or 'worldings'. It aims to present different modes of identifications, and the often intricate relationships between humans and other-than-humans from a relational perspective, with the hope of challenging our western perception of the world. It presents some thoughts on how different ontologies are unfolded through artworks and material culture, and how these worldings differ from one another.

  • 2.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rock art worldings2019In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 165-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Review of J. Hines (2004) Voices in the past. English Literature and Archaeology2008In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 113-116Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lund, Cajsa S.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. The European Music Archaeology Project EMAP, Sweden.
    Ringing stones in Sweden in the past and present: some reflections2019In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the archaeoacoustic subject of ringing rocks, chiefly from a Swedish perspective. Comprehensive and methodological studies on ringing stones in Sweden were not begun until the early 2000s, in the first instance by researchers at Uppsala University. An ongoing survey of ringing stones in Sweden carried out by the present author has thus far resulted in 41 such, indeed, timeless percussion instruments, as we might refer to them. This paper also discusses the use and function of ringing stones in both music-archaeological and ethno-musicological perspectives.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf