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  • 1.
    Amore, Alberto
    et al.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand;Univ Oulu, Finland;Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.
    From governance to meta-governance in tourism?: Re-incorporating politics, interests and values in the analysis of tourism governance2016In: Tourism Recreation Resarch, ISSN 0250-8281, E-ISSN 2320-0308, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 109-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its theorization in the political and policy sciences in the early 1990s, the concept of metagovernance has gained relatively little recognition in tourism studies. Nevertheless, its significance in the political sciences and policy literature, especially as a result of the perceived failure of governance systems following the recent global financial crisis, has only served to reinforce its relevance. Metagovernance addresses some of the perceived failures of traditional governance approaches and associated interventions, and has enabled the understanding of central-state led regimes of shadowed hierarchical authorities and local-level micro-practices of social innovation and self-government. In contrast, tourism studies have tended to restrict study of the political dimension of tourism governance and the role of the state under the traditional parallelism between government and governance. Examination of how governance is itself governed enables a better understanding of the practices of planning and policy making affecting tourism and destinations. In particular, the applications of concepts of governance are inextricably linked to a given set of value assumptions which predetermine the range of its application. A short example of the application of the metagovernance paradigm is provided from the New Zealand context. It is concluded that governance mechanisms are not value-neutral and instead serve to highlight the allocation of power in a destination and the dominance of particular values and interests.

  • 2.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Peeters, Paul
    Scott, D
    The Future of Tourism: Can Tourism Growth and Climate Policy be Reconciled?: A Climate Change Mitigation Perspective.2010In: Tourism Recreation Resarch, ISSN 0250-8281, E-ISSN 2320-0308, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 119-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism is an increasingly significant contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Emissions growth in the sector is in substantial conflict with global climate policy goals that seek to mitigate climate change through significant emission reductions. This article discusses the role of various tourism sub-sectors in generating emissions, and technical and management options in reducing these. It concludes that given observed and anticipated emission growth rates, technology and management will not be sufficient to achieve even modest absolute emission reductions in the sector, pointing to the key role of social and behavioural change in realizing climatically sustainable tourism. The article also discusses some of the systemic barriers that have to be overcome in order for tourism to comply with post- Kyoto Protocol global mitigation frameworks. The article concludes that radical change will be needed to reconcile the holiday and business travel demands of a growing world population with the climate policy targets of the international community, specifically restricting anthropogenic global warming to less than 2°C.

  • 3.
    Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. University of Canterbury, New Zealand;University of Oulu, Finland.
    Veer, Ekant
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    The DMO is dead. Long live the DMO (or, why dmo managers don’t care about post-structuralism)2016In: Tourism Recreation Resarch, ISSN 0250-8281, E-ISSN 2320-0308, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 354-357Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Scott, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Waterloo, Canada.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    What could the next 40 years hold for global tourism?2015In: Tourism Recreation Resarch, ISSN 0250-8281, E-ISSN 2320-0308, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 269-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 40 years, tourism has developed to become a sector of global economic, social and environmental significance. This paper provides a retrospective overview of the massive expansion and evolving geography of international and domestic tourism over the last 40 years, including the factors that enabled and challenged this growth, in order to contextualize a discussion of what the next 40 years may hold for global tourism. Social, technical, economic, environmental and political dimensions influencing tourism over the past and future 40 years are identified, together with a synthesis of available long-range scenarios of tourism futures to 2050. Comparisons with selected non-tourism scenarios suggest that current assessments of tourism futures are limited in scope, and that the tourism sector may have much to learn from scenario building and forecasting from other economic sectors and analyses of global grand challenges. Reconciling anticipated tourism growth with the sustainability and development imperatives of the next 40 years are discussed.

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