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  • 1.
    El-Sayed, A. M.
    et al.
    Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Canada.
    Delisle, J.
    Canadian Forest Service, Canada.
    De Lury, N.
    Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Canada.
    Gut, L. J.
    Michigan State University, USA.
    Judd, G. J. R.
    Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Canada.
    Legrand, Sacha
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Reissig, W. H.
    New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, USA.
    Roelofs, W. L.
    New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, USA.
    Unelius, C. Rikard
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Trimble, R. M.
    Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Canada.
    Geographic variation in pheromone chemistry, antennal electrophysiology, and pheromone-mediated trap catch of North American populations of the obliquebanded leafroller2003In: Environmental Entomology, ISSN 0046-225X, E-ISSN 1938-2936, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 470-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The total and relative amounts of (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate (Z11-14:Ac), (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate (E11-14:Ac), (Z)-11-tetradecen-1-ol (Z11-14:OH) and (Z)-11-tetradecenal (Z11-14:Al), and the EAG response of male antennae to these pheromone gland compounds were compared in laboratory reared Choristoneura rosaceana Harris (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) from British Columbia, Michigan, Ontario, New York, and Quebec. A field trapping experiment was conducted in each of these locations to determine the effect of Z11-14:Al on the numbers of moths captured. The amount of each of the four pheromone-gland compounds declined successively in moths from British Columbia, Quebec, Ontario, Michigan, and New York. The relative amount of Z11-14:Ac was greatest in moths from New York and smallest in moths from Ontario, whereas the relative amount of E11-14:Ac was greatest in moths from Ontario and smallest in moths from British Columbia. Moths from Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Michigan, and New York contained decreasing relative amounts of Z11-14:OH and Z11-14:Al. There was a trend of increasing antenna] sensitivity to each of the four pheromone-gland compounds in moths from New York, Michigan, Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia. The addition of 1% Z11:Al to a three compound blend of Z11-14:Ac, E11-14:Ac and Z11-14:OH (97:2:1) resulted in a >twofold increase in average trap catch in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec; this compound had no effect on trap catch in Michigan or New York.

  • 2.
    El-Sayed, A.
    et al.
    SLU, Sweden.
    Unelius, C. Rikard
    KTH, Sweden.
    Liblikas, I.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Lofqvist, J.
    SLU, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, M.
    SLU, Sweden.
    Witzgall, P.
    SLU, Sweden.
    Effect of codlemone isomers on codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) male attraction1998In: Environmental Entomology, ISSN 0046-225X, E-ISSN 1938-2936, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1250-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the effect of codlemone geometric isomers (E,Z)-, (Z,E)-, and (Z,Z)-8,10-dodecadienol on sex attraction of male codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), in the field and in a wind tunnel. The use of an ultrasound evaporator made it possible to apply known rates of compound at defined isomeric purity. In the wind tunnel, 5, 20, and 100% addition of Z,E isomer to (E,E) -8,10-dodecadienol (codlemone) slightly increased male night response. However, field captures with these blends were not significantly different from codlemone alone. A 20 and 100% addition of E,Z isomer decreased male landings on the odor source in the wind tunnel and trap captures in the field; Z,Z had an antagonistic effect at 100%. The equilibrium isomer blend (100% EB; 26% E,Z; 20% Z,E; 5% Z,Z) strongly reduced male attraction. The behavioral effect of isomerization of codlemone in dispenser materials used for mating disruption has to be taken into consideration.

  • 3.
    El-Sayed, Ashraf M.
    et al.
    New Zealand Institute of Plant & Food Research, New Zealand.
    Venkatesham, Uppala
    Unelius, C. Rikard
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. New Zealand Institute of Plant & Food Research, New Zealand.
    Sporle, Andrew
    New Zealand Institute of Plant & Food Research, New Zealand.
    Perez, Jeanneth
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Taylor, Phillip W.
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Suckling, David M.
    New Zealand Institute of Plant & Food Research, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Chemical Composition of the Rectal Gland and Volatiles Released by Female Queensland Fruit Fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Diptera:Tephritidae)2019In: Environmental Entomology, ISSN 0046-225X, E-ISSN 1938-2936, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 807-814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The composition of the rectal gland secretion and volatiles emitted by female Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni was investigated. Esters were found to be the main compounds in the gland extracts and headspace, while amides were the minor compounds in the gland extracts and headspace. Ethyl dodecanoate, ethyl tetradecanoate, ethyl (Z9)-hexadecenoate and ethyl palmitate were the main esters in the gland extracts, while ethyl dodecanoate and ethyl tetradecanoate were the main esters in the headspace. Four amides (N-(3-methylbutyl)acetamide), N-(2-methylbutyl)propanamide, N-(3-methylbutyl)propanamide, and N-(3-methylbutyl)-2-methylpropanamide were found in the gland extracts and the headspace. Among the amides, N-(3-methylbutyl)acetamide and N-(3-methylbutyl)propanamide were the main amides in the gland extracts and the headspace.Traces of three spiroacetals were found both in the gland extracts and in the headspace. (E,E)-2,8-Dimethyl-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane, (E,E)-2-ethyl-8-methyl-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane, (E,E)-2-propyl-8-methyl-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane. All compounds found in the headspace were present in the extract of the rectal gland suggesting that the rectal gland is the main source of the headspace volatiles, whose function remains to be elucidated.This is the first comprehensive chemical analysis of the rectal gland secretions and volatiles of female B. tryoni, and further laboratory and field bioassays are required to determine the function of compounds identified in this study. Discovery of the same amides previously identified in the male rectal gland in the female rectal gland raises questions about the pheromonal role previously suggested for these compounds.

  • 4.
    Kleiber, Joseph R.
    et al.
    Oregon State University.
    Unelius, C. Rikard
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Ltd., PB 4704, Christchurch, 8140, New Zealand.
    Lee, Jana
    USDAÐARS, Horticulture Crops Research Unit, Corvallis, OR 97331.
    Maxwell Suckling, David
    The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Ltd., PB 4704, Christchurch, 8140, New Zealand.
    Qian, Michael
    Oregon State University, Food Science and Technology, Corvallis, OR 97331.
    Bruck, Denny J.
    DuPont Pioneer, 7300 NW 62nd Ave., PO Box 1004, Johnston, IA 50131.
    Attractiveness of Fermentation and Related Products to Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae)2014In: Environmental Entomology, ISSN 0046-225X, E-ISSN 1938-2936, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 439-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory screening bioassays and field trapping experiments of spotted wing drosophila flies, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), were conducted to determine the attractiveness of 17 compounds as well as to compare attractant efficiency during peak fruit ripeness and postharvest captures late in the season. Compounds structurally related to each of the fermentation products acetic acid, ethanol, ethyl acetate, and 2-phenethyl alcohol were screened for attractiveness compared with a soap water control in greenhouse cage bioassays. The compounds determined to be attractive in the greenhouse bioassay (methanol, ethanol, propanol, formic acid, acetic acid, ethyl acetate, propyl acetate, phenethyl acetate, phenethyl propionate, and phenethyl butyrate) were individually tested in the field added to apple cider vinegar (ACV). The acids were also tested individually in neutralized AVC (NACV; pH 7). Combinations of the compounds were tested in NACV. The capture numbers in ACV traps were not significantly increased by the addition of any of the compounds tested, although significant deterrent effects of some of the compoundsallowed differences between treatments to be observed. Compounds that are most prevalent in wine and vinegar (methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, and ethyl acetate) as well as phenethyl propionate and phenethyl butyrate were less deterrent than the other compounds tested in the field. Captures during peak fruit ripeness were compared with the postharvest period when fruit hosts were not available or were overripe. Although the total number of flies captured late in the season was lower, the trends in treatment performance were similar, indicating a consistent performance of these baits from peak fruit ripeness through postharvest.

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