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  • 1. Ekman, Elisabet
    Antihypertensive drugs and erectile dysfunction as seen in spontaneous reports, with focus on angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers2010In: Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, ISSN 1179-1365, E-ISSN 1179-1365, Vol. 2, p. 21-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe spontaneously reported cases of erectile dysfunction (ED) in association with angiotensin II type I blockers (ARB) and other antihypertensive drugs.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS: All spontaneously reported cases of ED submitted to the Swedish Medical Products Agency (MPA) between 1990 and 2006, where at least one antihypertensive drug was the suspected agent, were scrutinized. Patient demographics, drug treatment and adverse reactions were recorded. Using the Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network (BCPNN) method, the information component (IC) was calculated.

    RESULTS: Among a total of 225 reports of ED, 59 involved antihypertensive drugs including ARB (9 cases) as suspected agents. A positive IC value was found indicating that ED was reported more often in association with antihypertensive drugs classes, except for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, compared with all other drugs in the database. Positive dechallenge was reported in 43 cases (72%).

    DISCUSSION: All classes of major antihypertensive drugs including ARB were implicated as suspected agents in cases of ED. Few risk factors were identified. The relatively high reporting of ED in association with ARB is in contrast with previous studies, suggesting that ARB have neither a positive nor any effect on ED. This discrepancy suggests that further studies are warrnted on this potential adverse reaction to ARB.

  • 2.
    Ekman, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Tågerud, Sven
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bäckström, Martin
    Awareness among nurses about reporting of adverse drug reactions in Sweden2012In: Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, ISSN 1179-1365, E-ISSN 1179-1365, Vol. 4, p. 61-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate awareness among nurses regarding their new role as reporters of adverse drug reactions in Sweden and factors that may influence reporting by nurses.

    Methods: In 2007, all nurses were included in the adverse drug reaction reporting scheme in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to 753 randomly selected nurses in September 2010.

    Results: Of the 453 (60%) responding nurses, 265 (58%) were aware that nurses were included in the reporting of adverse drug reactions. Sixty-one nurses (14%) stated that they had reported an adverse drug reaction. Fifteen percent (n = 70) of the respondents had received training about reporting of adverse drug reactions. Almost one third of these (n = 21, 30%) had reported an adverse drug reaction on at least one occasion. Among nurses without training, a smaller proportion (n = 40, 11%, P < 0.05) had reported an adverse drug reaction on at least one occasion. The two factors considered most important by nurses for reporting were the severity of the adverse drug reaction and if the reaction was to a newly approved drug. A majority of the nurses (n = 397, 88%) were interested in a training course in pharmacology as part of their ongoing professional development. One third (32%) of all nurses stated that one reason for not reporting a suspected adverse drug reaction was that the physician responsible did not regard the reaction necessary to report.

    Conclusion: We found that more than half of the study population of nurses in Sweden were aware of their new role as reporters of adverse drug reactions, but few of the responding nurses had reported an adverse drug reaction. Given that training seems to be associated with high reporting frequency, we suggest more training in pharmacovigilance for nurses.

  • 3.
    Nordqvist, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. Region Kalmar County, Sweden.
    Lönnbom Svensson, Ulrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Brundin, Lars
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden;Linköping university, Sweden.
    Wanby, Pär
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Adherence to risk management guidelines for drugs which cause vitamin D deficiency – big data from the Swedish health system2019In: Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, ISSN 1179-1365, E-ISSN 1179-1365, Vol. 11, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Several medications are known to cause vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this study is to describe vitamin D testing and supplementation in patients using these “risk medications”, thereby assessing adherence to medical guidelines.Patients and methods: A database with electronic health records for the population in a Swedish County (≈240,000 inhabitants) was screened for patients prescribed the pre-defined “risk medications” during a 2-year period (2014–2015). In total, 12,194 patients were prescribed “risk medications” pertaining to one of the three included pharmaceutical groups. Vitamin D testing and concomitant vitamin D supplementation, including differences between the included pharmaceutical groups, was explored by matching personal identification numbers.Results: Corticosteroids were prescribed to 10,003 of the patients, antiepileptic drugs to 1,101, and drugs mainly reducing vitamin D uptake to 864. Two hundred twenty-six patients were prescribed >1 “risk medication”. Seven hundred eighty-seven patients (6.5%) had been tested during the 2-year period. There were no differences regarding testing frequency between groups. Concomitant supplements were prescribed to 3,911 patients (32.1%). It was more common to be prescribed supplements when treated with corticosteroids. Vitamin D supplementation was more common among tested patients in all three groups. Women were tested and supplemented to a higher extent. The mean vitamin D level was 69 nmol/L. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 24.1% of tested patients, while 41.3% had optimal levels. It was less common to be deficient and more common to have optimal levels among patients prescribed corticosteroids.Conclusion: Adherence to medical guidelines comprising testing and supplementation of patients prescribed drugs causing vitamin D deficiency needs improvement in Sweden.

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