lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Commentary on Grauer and Miller, and DeWitte and Kowaleski2018In: Fragments: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Pasts, ISSN 2161-8585, Vol. 7, p. 73-79Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The papers by DeWitte and Kowaleski, and Grauer and Miller are exemplary interdisciplinary studies, bringing together the written word of historical records with the material remains of the dead to tell a more complete and complex story about violence and disease in Medieval England. Both demonstrate how integrated, critical analysis of varying sources through the lens of different disciplines adds both nuance and depth to our understanding of the past. This commentary will engage these two papers in a discussion about key components of their interdisciplinary scholarship, but also push further by pointing out dimensions and possibilities that they leave unexplored. The purpose of doing this is not to critique the papers’ findings, but rather to open up a discussion of new directions for interdisciplinary scholarship, especially in the era of the “Third Science Revolution”[1] and its effects on archaeology, bioarchaeology, and our understanding of the past. This commentary will challenge the idea of what we expect interdisciplinary work in archaeology to “look like”; it will break away from the limiting dyadic relationship that has come to dominate the field in favor of a more dynamic and expanding approach that engages with a broader range of disciplines on equal terms.

1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf