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  • 1.
    Allen, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Marriages of convenience?: Teachers and coursebooks in the digital age2015In: ELT Journal, ISSN 0951-0893, E-ISSN 1477-4526, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 249-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a survey of Swedish EFL teachers’ attitudes towards,and dependence on, ELT coursebook packages in the light of recent researchinto digital literacy. The results showed that while ICT is making massiveinroads into language classrooms in technologically advantaged countrieslike Sweden, the coursebook package still has its place assured amongtrainee teachers, at least for the immediate future. The current generationof ‘digital native’ pre-service teachers still looks to coursebook packagesto structure lessons during teaching practice and as a means of providingextended reading practice in the L2. Their more experienced in-servicecolleagues are, however, increasingly abandoning the coursebook in favour offreestanding digital resources. Practising teachers in the survey increasinglysaw coursebooks in contingency terms and as a ‘fall-back’ position. Finally,the article considers the desirability of a more fundamental abandonment ofthe coursebook in favour of digital tools and resources in the EFL classroom.

  • 2.
    Allen, Christopher
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Hadjistassou, Stella
    University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Remote tutoring of pre-service EFL teachers using iPads2018In: ELT Journal, ISSN 0951-0893, E-ISSN 1477-4526, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 353-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the availability of portable and relatively inexpensive audiovideo recording devices in the form of iPads and other mobile technologies in combination with increasing bandwidth, the remote observation and training of pre-service EFL student teachers without the physical presence of a tutor in the classroom is now a viable proposition. This paper reports on a novel initiative to provide remote feedback to a group of primary EFL pre-service teachers on teaching practice placement in Africa from a tutor based in Sweden via iPad minis and the training institution’s Moodle virtual learning environment. The feedback was assessed in relation to the Cambridge English Teaching Framework. Results suggest that the combination of recorded audiovideo material during the pre-service teachers’ teaching practice and Moodle feedback from the remote tutor can provide a valuable basis for tutorial support, formative assessment, and reflection for student EFL teachers on teaching practice.

  • 3.
    Siegel, Aki
    Rikkyo University, Japan.
    What should we talk about?: The authenticity of textbook topics2014In: ELT Journal, ISSN 0951-0893, E-ISSN 1477-4526, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 363-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topics presented in textbooks and covered in language classrooms are crucial parts of language teaching, as they facilitate student engagement, willingness to communicate, and ultimately, learning. However, whilst researchers and practitioners frequently discuss the authenticity of the language in textbooks, the authenticity and usefulness of textbook topics are rarely discussed or evaluated. To investigate their authenticity, topics from ELT textbooks and naturally occurring conversations were collected, categorized, and compared. The conversations occurred in English between Japanese and non-Japanese students from ten different countries at a university dormitory in Japan. When the textbooks and conversations were compared, large discrepancies between the treatment of some topics became evident, including students’ school lives. Pedagogic implications stemming from this review include incorporating topics that are realistic and practical for L2 English users into language classrooms to better prepare students for the ‘world out there’.

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More styles
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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