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  • 1.
    Agevall, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Olofsson, Gunnar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    The Emergence of the Professional Field of Higher Education in Sweden2013In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The changing structure of the Swedish university system has shaped its corps of university teachers. The analytical device used to demonstrate this connection is the changing social functions of Swedish universities which serve as the lens through which we understand this change. We argue for five successive and historically added layers of functions: the training of church officials, state functionaries, experts of the industrial society, the welfare professions, and, finally, the mass of employees of the “knowledge society.” Each new function is superimposed on the existing ones, adding to the complexity of tasks, areas of knowledge, and teacher categories in the universities. The position of the university as the arbiter of the highest form of knowledge, the internal differentiation of the field of higher education, and the growth and stratification of its teaching corps are three main building blocks for this history of the Swedish system of higher education.

  • 2.
    Flisbäck, Marita
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lund, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Artists' Autonomy and Professionalization in a New Cultural Policy Landscape2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using literature on the professions, the article explores how a new political model for funding and steering may affect professional autonomy. Professional groups’ efforts to independently practice their profession during times of political change are elaborated. The professional group in questions is artists, the context is Sweden, and the new model is called the Collaborative Cultural Model. This model entails a shift in the funding and realization of cultural policy from the national to the regional level. From a situation in which civil servants with specific culture knowledge were involved, politicians, representatives of civil society, civil servants and artists are now to work together to create a regional culture plan. In the article, two different outcomes of the new model are discussed as possible. It can lead to de-professionalization process, particularly if the policy on keeping outside influences at “arm’s length” weakens. On the other hand, negotiations between different actors could result in artists’ knowledge becoming more prominent and receiving more recognition than previously. This, in turn, could promote professional artists’ status.

  • 3.
    Flisbäck, Marita
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lund, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Editorial: Artists and Professionalism2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Artists and professionalism is a special issue with the overall aim to bring artistic professions into the field of professions and professionalism. The issue consists of four contributions that all highlight artistic professions from different perspectives, such as artists’ educational possibilities, professional careers, strategies for inclusion and exclusion, professional logics and boundary-makings, how professional autonomy is affected by welfare states policies and so forth.

  • 4.
    Funck, Elin K.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Professional archetype change: The effects of restricted professional autonomy2012In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the points on which researchers agree is the centrality of autonomy to professionalism. Moreover, a common conclusion in the studies of professions is that the profound changes in society over the last fifty years have threatened the autonomy and changed the archetype of professionalism. This paper contributes to the research on changes and continuities, challenges and opportunities for professionalism by discussing advantages and disadvantages of restricted professional autonomy. By describing the historical development in the Swedish and Canadian healthcare context, two major findings are discussed. First, although medical professionals have been subjected to certain constraints, they still appear to maintain a relatively high level of autonomy concerning the technical content of the work. Second, restricting professional autonomy is not negative merely due to the preservation of the professional archetype; rather, a «reasonable» limitation can be positive if professional autonomy is understood as a contract based on public trust.

  • 5.
    Kallio, Tomi J.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. University of Turku, Finland.
    Tevameri, Terhi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Vähätalo, Mervi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Nurses' organizational roles: stakeholders’ expectations2018In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 1-17, article id e1973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we analysed stakeholders’ organizational role expectations for nurses. We defined organizational role expectations as a set of informal expectations in behavioural patterns and formal expectations in work tasks related to a certain position in the organization. A qualitative study was conducted, and content analysis was applied to 150 articles published in a Finnish nursing trade journal. We identified five general organizational role expectations of patients and their relatives, physicians and other healthcare professionals, the work community, the nursing association, and legislators in our analysis: “the alongside stroller,” “the patients’ advocate,” “the reliable colleague and team member,” “the expert and skills developer,” and “the organizational underdog.” This study explores these nursing roles and links stakeholder perspective to the organizational role expectations in professional services.

  • 6.
    Krantz, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Fritzén, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    From Expert to Novice?: The Influence of Management by Documents on Teachers Knowledge Base and Norms.2017In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 7, no 3, article id e2113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to reveal how teachers experience the effects of management by documents in their professional practice. Approximately one hundred primary school teachers were asked to describe their daily teaching work with special focus on the demands in terms of the production of documentation. The reports were analysed using a “profession theoretical” model which focuses on the following aspects of professional knowledge: recognition, emotional engagement, and evaluation of and responsibility for one’s own work. The results show that the teachers have experienced that the teaching profession has changed because of fixation on results, and fragmentation has resulted in a decrease in the levels of trust and a feeling that the work is boring. The internal pedagogic discourse is weakened because of the presence of an external legal discourse. Management by documents can thus be a factor that causes a professional regression.

  • 7.
    Sjöstrand, Glenn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    The Field of Technology in Sweden:  The Historical Take-off of the Engineering Professions2013In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the engineering profession has been called “the failed profession” owing to its lack of social closure, engineers have been successful in claiming their area of expertise and specialized knowledge as legitimate areas of research, knowledge, and intervention. In this article, the historical development of engineering professions in Sweden is used as a case of professional development. With the use of primary statistical sources and secondary historical sources, I endeavor to explain engineers’ professional development via coinciding factors such as the expansion and scientific content of lower and higher engineering education, the struggle for power in interest groups and unions, and engineers’ position in what seems to be an ever-increasingly diversified labor market. I argue that the professionalization process for Swedish engineers has fluctuated and that more than one professional take-off (two or even three) has occurred.

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