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  • 1.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Älvsborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Henrik
    Älvsborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jiménez-Herrera, Maria
    Universitat Rovira I Virgili, Spain.
    Bång, Angela
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Andersson, Henrik
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Sweden.
    Ljungström, Lars
    Skaraborg Hospital, Sweden.
    The Early Chain of Care in Patients with Bacteraemia with the Emphasis on the Prehospital Setting2016In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 272-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of knowledge about the early phase of severe infection. This report describes the early chain of care in bacteraemia as follows: (a) compare patients who were and were not transported by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS); (b) describe various aspects of the EMS chain; and (c) describe factors of importance for the delay to the start of intravenous antibiotics. It was hypothesized that, for patients with suspected sepsis judged by the EMS clinician, the delay until the onset of antibiotic treatment would be shorter.

    All patients in the Municipality of Gothenburg (Sweden) with a positive blood culture, when assessed at the Laboratory of Bacteriology in the Municipality of Gothenburg, from February 1 through April 30, 2012 took part in the survey.

    In all, 696 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Their mean age was 76 years and 52% were men. Of all patients, 308 (44%) had been in contact with the EMS and/or the emergency department (ED). Of these 308 patients, 232 (75%) were transported by the EMS and 188 (61%) had “true pathogens” in blood cultures. Patients who were transported by the EMS were older, included more men, and suffered from more severe symptoms and signs.

    The EMS nurse suspected sepsis in only six percent of the cases. These patients had a delay from arrival at hospital until the start of antibiotics of one hour and 19 minutes versus three hours and 21 minutes among the remaining patients (P =.0006). The corresponding figures for cases with “true pathogens” were one hour and 19 minutes versus three hours and 15 minutes (P =.009).

    Among patients with bacteraemia, 75% used the EMS, and these patients were older, included more men, and suffered from more severe symptoms and signs. The EMS nurse suspected sepsis in six percent of cases. Regardless of whether or not patients with true pathogens were isolated, a suspicion of sepsis by the EMS clinician at the scene was associated with a shorter delay to the start of antibiotic treatment.

  • 2.
    Bremer, Anders
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sandman, Lars
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Balancing Between Closeness and Distance: Emergency medical services personnel’s experiences of caring for families at out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and deaths2012In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a lethal health problem thataffects between 236,000 and 325,000 people in the United States each year. As resuscitationattempts are unsuccessful in 70-98% of OHCA cases, Emergency Medical Services(EMS) personnel often face the needs of bereaved family members.Problem: Decisions to continue or terminate resuscitation at OHCA are influenced byfactors other than patient clinical characteristics, such as EMS personnel’s knowledge,attitudes, and beliefs regarding family emotional preparedness. However, there is littleresearch exploring how EMS personnel care for bereaved family members, or how theyare affected by family dynamics and the emotional contexts. The aim of this study is toanalyze EMS personnel’s experiences of caring for families when patients suffer cardiacarrest and sudden death.Methods: The study is based on a hermeneutic lifeworld approach. Qualitative interviewswere conducted with 10 EMS personnel from an EMS agency in southern Sweden.Results: The EMS personnel interviewed felt responsible for both patient care and familycare, and sometimes failed to prioritize these responsibilities as a result of their ownperceptions, feelings and reactions. Moving from patient care to family care implied amovement from well-structured guidance to a situational response, where the personnelwere forced to balance between interpretive reasoning and a more direct emotionalresponse, at their own discretion. With such affective responses in decision-making, thepersonnel risked erroneous conclusions and care relationships with elements of dishonesty,misguided benevolence and false hopes. The ability to recognize and respond to people’sexistential questions and needs was essential. It was dependent on the EMS personnel’sbalance between closeness and distance, and on their courage in facing the emotionalexpressions of the families, as well as the personnel’s own vulnerability. The presence offamily members placed great demands on mobility (moving from patient care to familycare) in the decision-making process, invoking a need for ethical competence.Conclusion: Ethical caring competence is needed in the care of bereaved family membersto avoid additional suffering. Opportunities to reflect on these situations within a frameworkof care ethics, continuous moral education, and clinical ethics training are needed.Support in dealing with personal discomfort and clear guidelines on family support couldbenefit EMS personnel.Bremer A, Dahlberg K, Sandman

  • 3.
    Doohan, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University.
    Exploring injury panorama, consequences, and recovery among bus crash survivors: a mixed-methods research study2017In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 165-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore physical and mental consequences and injury mechanisms among bus crash survivors to identify aspects that influence recovery.

    METHODS: The study participants were the total population of survivors (N=56) from a bus crash in Sweden. The study had a mixed-methods design that provided quantitative and qualitative data on injuries, mental well-being, and experiences. Results from descriptive statistics and qualitative thematic analysis were interpreted and integrated in a mixed-methods analysis.

    RESULTS: Among the survivors, 11 passengers (20%) sustained moderate to severe injuries, and the remaining 45 (80%) had minor or no physical injuries. Two-thirds of the survivors screened for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) risk were assessed, during the period of one to three months after the bus crash, as not being at-risk, and the remaining one-third were at-risk. The thematic analysis resulted in themes covering the consequences and varying aspects that affected the survivors' recoveries. The integrated findings are in the form of four "core cases" of survivors who represent a combination of characteristics: injury severity, mental well-being, social context, and other aspects hindering and facilitating recovery. Core case Avery represents a survivor who had minor or no injuries and who demonstrated a successful mental recovery. Core case Blair represents a survivor with moderate to severe injuries who experienced a successful mental recovery. Core case Casey represents a survivor who sustained minor injuries or no injuries in the crash but who was at-risk of developing PTSD. Core case Daryl represents a survivor who was at-risk of developing PTSD and who also sustained moderate to severe injuries in the crash.

    CONCLUSION: The present study provides a multi-faceted understanding of mass-casualty incident (MCI) survivors (ie, having minor injuries does not always correspond to minimal risk for PTSD and moderate to severe injuries do not always correspond to increased risk for PTSD). Injury mitigation measures (eg, safer roadside material and anti-lacerative windows) would reduce the consequences of bus crashes. A well-educated rescue team and a compassionate and competent social environment will facilitate recovery. Doohan I , Björnstig U , Östlund U , Saveman BI . Exploring injury panorama, consequences, and recovery among bus crash survivors: a mixed-methods research study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(2):165-174.

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