lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bonakdar, Farshid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Sasic Kalagasidis, Angela
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    The Implications of Climate Zones on the Cost-Optimal Level and Cost-Effectiveness of Building Envelope Energy Renovation and Space Heat Demand Reduction2017In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 7, no 2, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cost-optimal level of energy performance for buildings shall be identified according to the European directive of 2010. The Swedish building stock needs comprehensive knowledge and an overall strategy for the cost-optimal level of renovation. This paper studies the contribution of Swedish climate zones to the cost-optimal level of renovation on a multi-story residential building in Sweden from the building owner perspective. The building space heat demand is simulated for four Swedish climate zones. The net present profit (NPP) method is defined and used in this study in order to analyze the cost-optimal level and the cost-effective renovation of building envelope components (e.g., attic floor, basement walls, exterior walls and windows). The implication of different discount rates is studied, as well. The results show that the optimum renovation of the building envelope offers 51% more energy savings for space heating when the building is in a northern climate zone compared to a southern zone. The study suggests that different renovation strategies for the building stock renovation need to be identified, separately, for each climate zone. The NPP analysis identifies the minimum required investment and maximum achievable energy savings that are needed to have a cost-effective renovation. The broad range of studied climate zones provides the opportunity to apply the obtained results to other climate zones by either interpolation or extrapolation of NPPs for the buildings with similar characteristics.

  • 2.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Pardalis, Georgios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Mainali, Brijesh
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Physical vs. Aesthetic Renovations: Learning from Swedish House Owners2019In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we identify the socio-economic attributes and attitudes that have influencedhouse owners in renovating their homes in the past. Our study is based on responses to an onlinequestionnaire survey of 971 house owners living in Kronoberg County in Sweden. Results showedthat the interest and willingness of the house owners to perform a renovation varied dependingon their demographic background and the age of the house. The latter positively affected pastrenovations, only when combined with the residence time. Furthermore, the age of house ownersstrongly and positively affected the probability of performing aesthetic type of renovations, becauseof a long time of residence in the house. Younger, town living, and highly educated house ownersseem to be more concerned regarding saving energy, which motivated them to perform physicalrenovations on their house. Our results also suggest that income, level of education, and place ofresidence have an effect on renovation decisions only through their effect on the energy concern ofhouse owners, and a varied effect on renovation decisions, when combined with the time of residencein the house.

  • 3.
    Dodoo, Ambrose
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Ayarkwa, Joshua
    Kwame Nkrumah Univ Sci & Technol, Ghana.
    Effects of Climate Change for Thermal Comfort and Energy Performance of Residential Buildings in a Sub-Saharan African Climate2019In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents an analysis of the impacts of climate change on thermal comfort and energy performance of residential buildings in Ghana, in sub-Saharan Africa, and explores mitigation as well as adaptation strategies to improve buildings' performance under climate change conditions. The performances of the buildings are analyzed for both recent and projected future climates for the Greater Accra and Ashanti regions of Ghana, using the IDA-ICE dynamic simulation software, with climate data from the Meteonorm global climate database. The results suggest that climate change will significantly influence energy performance and indoor comfort conditions of buildings in Ghana. However, effective building design strategies could significantly improve buildings' energy and indoor climate performances under both current and future climate conditions. The simulations show that the cooling energy demand of the analyzed building in the Greater Accra region is 113.9 kWh/m(2) for the recent climate, and this increases by 31% and 50% for the projected climates for 2030 and 2050, respectively. For the analyzed building in the Ashanti region, the cooling energy demand is 104.4 kWh/m(2) for the recent climate, and this increases by 6% and 15% for the 2030 and 2050 climates, respectively. Furthermore, indoor climate and comfort deteriorate under the climate change conditions, in contrast to the recent conditions.

  • 4.
    Jalilzadehazhari, Elaheh
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Vadiee, Amir
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Achieving a trade‐off construction solution using BIM, an optimization algorithm, and a multi‐criteria decision‐making method2019In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 1-14, article id 81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Energy Performance of Building Directive obligated all European countries to reduce the energy requirements of buildings while simultaneously improving indoor environment quality. Any such improvements not only enhance the health of the occupants and their productivity, but also provide further economic benefits at the national level. Accomplishing this task requires a method that allows building professionals to resolve conflicts between visual and thermal comfort, energy demands, and life‐cycle costs. To overcome these conflicts, this study exploits the incorporation of building information modelling (BIM), the design of experiments as an optimization algorithm, and the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) into a multi‐criteria decision‐ making method. Any such incorporation can (i) create constructive communication between building professionals, such as architects, engineers, and energy experts; (ii) allow the analysis of the performance of multiple construction solutions with respect to visual and thermal comfort, energy demand, and life‐cycle costs; and (iii) help to select a trade‐off solution, thereby making a suitable decision. Three types of energy‐efficient windows, and five types of ground floors, roofs, and external wall constructions were considered as optimization variables. The incorporation of several methods allowed the analysis of the performance of 375 construction solutions based on a combination of optimization variables, and helped to select a trade‐off solution. The results showed the strength of incorporation for analyzing big‐data through the intelligent use of BIM and a simulation in the field of the built environment, energy, and costs. However, when applying AHP, the results are strongly contingent on pairwise comparisons

  • 5.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Olsson, Stefan
    Energy Agency for Southeast Sweden, Växjö.
    Energy performance of two multi-storey wood-frame passive houses in Sweden2015In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 5, p. 1207-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two eight-story wood-framed residential buildings with the Swedish 2012passive house standard were built in 2009 in the Portvakten Söder quarter in the city of Växjöin Sweden. In this paper, we present the monitored specific energy use of the buildings andcompare to the requirements of the Swedish building code and recommendation for passivehouses. We also estimated the primary energy use and CO2 emissions and investigated thetenants’ views and experiences of the two buildings. Results show that the actual specificenergy use of 40.2 kWh/m2Atemp/year in the Portvakten Söder building fulfills, by a goodmargin, the requirements of the Swedish building code and the recommended passive housestandard, but is higher than projected. Applying a marginal perspective, the calculatedprimary energy use and carbon dioxide emission from operating the buildings (excludinghousehold electricity) was 40 kWh/m2Atemp/year and zero, respectively. Responses of 20 tenantsto a mail-in questionnaire survey showed that over 90% were satisfied with their apartments.

  • 6.
    Pardalis, Georgios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Mainali, Brijesh
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Swedish House Owners’ Intentions Towards Renovations: Is there a Market for One-Stop-Shop?2019In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 1-16, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine factors aecting owners’ intention for renovation of their detached houses. Furthermore, we analyze their interest in choosing a one-stop-shop (OSS) service for the renovation, even though such a concept is not yet established in Sweden, but emerging in other parts of Europe. Our study is based on responses to an online questionnaire survey of 971 house owners residing in Kronoberg Region in Sweden. About 76% of the respondents intend to renovate in the near future, with approximately 71% of them preferring to renovate individual components of their dwelling and 5% to renovate their whole house in steps. House owners of younger age, higher income, higher education, and those with an interest for environmental issues, were the ones most interested in physical renovations, which improves energy efficiency of the building. For those house owners, one-stop-shop can facilitate the decision-making process, and help them to choose those measures that will improve their quality of life. Approximately 20% of the respondents had a positive view towards an one-stop-shop, which is an indicator that market for such a service exists. Parameters such as quality of work, cost and energy savings and specification of measures to be adopted are the key for the promotion of one-stop-shop. Additionally, house owners want to have a certain level of involvement in the selection of actors performing the renovation. Moreover, financial incentives, e.g., loans, do not play a significant role for the selection of one-stop-shop, but act as complementary motive for house owners.

  • 7.
    Vadiee, Amir
    Mälardalen University.
    Jalilzadehazhari, Elaheh
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Heat Supply Comparison in a Single-Family Housewith Radiator and Floor Heating Systems2020In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Floor heating and radiators are two of the most common types of hydronic heating systemsused for space heating in single-family houses in cold climate regions. Notwithstanding, there are fewcomparative studies on indoor temperature distribution and system cost evaluations for radiatorsand floor heating. Furthermore, there are no aligned outcomes in terms of total heat supply fora single-family house with radiators or floor heating. In this study, the eect of building energyeciency level and construction type, including flooring material, on the supply heating demand andtransmission heat losses were studied for both radiator and floor heating systems. For this purpose,a single-family house located in Växjö, Sweden, was modeled as a case study. The heating demandwas supplied with a district heating system with a similar supply temperature at 45 C for both theradiator and floor heating system. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to assess the eect offlooring configurations on the annual supply heating demand for both conventional and passiveversions of the case-study building. The results showed that the radiator-integrated building had alower supply heating demand in comparison with the floor heating-integrated buildings. Based onthe sensitivity studies, the flooring material did not have a significant influence on the supply heatingdemand and on the transmission heat losses in the case of the radiators. The supply heating demandwas only reduced up to 3% if the flooring U-value was improved by 60%. The results also showedthat refurbishment in a standard conventional building with a radiator heating system based on thepassive criteria led to a 58% annual energy savings, while this amount for a building with a floorheating system was approximately 49%.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf