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  • 1.
    Laohaprapanon, Sawanya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Removal of Organic Pollutants from Wastewater Using Wood Fly Ash as a Low-Cost Sorbent2010In: CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water, ISSN 1863-0650, E-ISSN 1863-0669, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1055-1061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study untreated and treated wood fly ash (WA) was used as a low cost sorbent in batch sorption tests to investigate the removal of organic pollutants from a real wastewater generated by cleaning/washing of machinery in a wood laminate floor industry in Sweden The experiments focused on the effect of the WA dosage and particle size on the removal efficiency for organic compounds With a WA dosage of 160 g L-1 and a particle size less thin 1 mm the reductions of chemical oxygen demand (COD) biologic oxygen demand and total organic carbon were 37 +/- 0 4 24 +/- 0 4 and 30 +/- 0 3% respectively Pre treatment of WA with hot water improved the COD removal efficiency by absorption from 37 +/- 0 4 to 42 +/- 1 6% when the same dosage (160 g L-1) was applied Sorption isotherm and sorption kinetics for COD using untreated WA can be explained by Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models Intra particle diffusion model indicates that pore diffusion is not the rate limiting step for COD removal Based on the experimental data WA could be used as an alternative low cost sorption media/filter for removal of organic compounds from real industrial wastewater.

  • 2.
    Laohaprapanon, Sawanya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Packed-Column of Granular Activated Carbons for Removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand from Industrial Wastewater2013In: CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water, ISSN 1863-0650, E-ISSN 1863-0669, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 244-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal by packed-columns of activated carbon (AC) derived from two different materials (coal activated carbon, CAC and wood activated carbon, WAC) is reported as part of an on-site wastewater treatment system for handling small volumes of wastewater generated at wood-floor industries for which there are no proper on-site treatment options available in the market. The performance of the sorbents, the effect of bed depth (0.19 and 0.57 m) and volumetric load (0.10 and 0.24 m h−1) on the breakthrough curve of sorption systems were studied. The results indicated the feasibility of using both ACs to treat these wastewaters. At the bed depth (0.57 m), volumetric load (0.24 m h−1), and 30% breakthrough, CAC and WAC showed treatment capacity of 40.5 L kg−1 in 250 h and 23.8 L kg−1 in 63 h, respectively. This indicated that CAC requires longer retention times to reach a performance similar to WAC. The experimental data was fit into the bed depth-service time model showing that under the same conditions, CAC had higher maximum sorption capacity (N0) than WAC. Moreover, thermal regeneration at 500°C temperature could be a cost-effective procedure since the reuse of spent AC through such regeneration process for further treatment could still achieve 90% of the initial sorption capacity, reducing then costs for the use of new sorbents and also the need for waste disposal.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Henric
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Combined Ozone and Biological Treatment of Oak Wood Leachate2015In: CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water, ISSN 1863-0650, E-ISSN 1863-0669, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 598-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we investigated the possibility of treating oak wood leachate with a combined ozone and biological treatment. Wood leachate is characterized by high amounts of organic carbon and is reported as being toxic to aquatic organisms. Ozone was used as a pre-treatment before using aerobic degradation. The biological treatment was applied for seven days and evaluated using head-space respirometry. Target pollutant in this investigation was polyphenols in combination with more general parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and colour. A custom made bubble column reactor was used, 1.5 L of wood leachate was exposed to 0-4 g/L of ozone, corresponding to a specific ozone dose between 0.7-7 g/L O-3/g of initial COD. Oak wood leachate was found to be easily degraded by ozone, with >90% of polyphenols degraded. COD was degraded by 73%, TOC by 61% and colour by 97% by ozone. Furthermore, a positive correlation between biodegradation and ozone pre-treatment was found.

  • 4.
    Svensson, Henric
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Determination of Nutrient Deficiency in Stormwater from the Wood Industry for Biological Treatment2015In: CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water, ISSN 1863-0650, E-ISSN 1863-0669, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 38-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The efficiency of biological treatment systems in degrading organic matter is affected by both the available nutrients and the efficiency of the microbial organisms that carry out the degradation. This study assesses whether a wetland treatment system treating stormwater from a wood industrial site faced nutrient deficiency or lacked efficient microbes, and whether addressing these possible problems could enhance the degradation of organic matter in the system. The stormwater was a mix of industrial stormwater, irrigation water and leachate from woodchip piles. The industry mainly processes pedunculate oak, which is known to create a leachate high in polyphenols. This water is currently treated in a pilot-scale wetland system and an aerated lagoon. To study whether the treatability could be enhanced by addition of nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen, micronutrients), headspace respirometry was used. The effect of adding microbes from a paper mill activated sludge system was also evaluated. Our results showed that all nutrient additions had a positive effect on the treatability of the stormwater. In particular, the addition of nitrogen showed a 12% rise in chemical oxygen demand reduction over 336h. However, addition of paper mill activated sludge did not enhance the degradation of organic matter; instead, a toxic effect of the stormwater was shown.

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