lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Blomqvist, Lars
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Shape stability of laminated veneer products: a review – defining and achieving shape stability2015In: International Wood Products Journal, ISSN 2042-6445, E-ISSN 2042-6453, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laminated veneer products (LVPs) consist of veneers bonded together with an adhesive into a predetermined shape. Deviation from the intended shape is a problem for both manufacturers and customers of the final products. The shape stability of LVP depends on a variety of material and process parameters, and this review identifies several important factors that influence shape stability, the purpose being to find ways of decreasing distortion and improving shape stability so that product quality can be improved.

    The review ends to the following statements:

    The fibre orientation of the veneer strongly influences the shape stability of LVP. The products can show considerable distortion (particularly twist) if the fibre orientation of the veneer is oriented in an unsuitable way in the assembly before moulding.

    The effect of fibre orientation on shape stability can be very small directly after moulding, but it can increase considerably when the moulded product is subjected to a change in moisture content (MC). In general, a change in moisture leads to distortion. Moisture changes alone, however, result in a controlled distortion.

    The orientation of the loose and tight sides of the veneers in LVP affects the shape stability.

    An asymmetrical construction, coupled with different levels of moisture in the different veneers in an assembly before moulding, will result in poor shape stability of the product.

    The choice of wood species affects shape stability. Beech shows more distortion and poorer shape stability than birch.

    Based on existing knowledge to produce shape-stable LVP, the veneers should be conditioned to uniform MC and sorted with regard to fibre orientation and loose or tight side of the veneer before bonding. End-user climates should govern the veneers’ MC and added moisture from the adhesive during the process. Straight grain veneers and symmetry should always be sought.

    This review reveals several areas that need to be further clarified in order to achieve shape-stable LVP, for example the influence of adhesive, the distribution of pressure, temperature, stresses and strains during moulding and the development of numerical methods to better predict the final shape.

  • 2.
    Mahnert, K-C
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute of Wood Technolgy, Norway ; Georg August University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Koch, G
    Thünen Institute of Wood Research, Germany.
    Militz, Holger
    Georg August University of Göttingen, Germany.
    UV-microspectrophotometry: A method to prove wood modification with MMF?2015In: International Wood Products Journal, ISSN 2042-6445, E-ISSN 2042-6453, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 27-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modification of wood with methylolated melamine formaldehyde resin belongs to the group of impregnation modifications. In the course of this study, Koto sapwood samples were impregnated with methylolated melamine formaldehyde resin solutions in a full cell vacuum pressure process. The samples were cured at a maximum temperature of 120°C for 24 h. To characterise the modification, the solution uptake and weight percent gain of the samples were calculated. The fixation of the melamine as parameter for the degree of curing was examined by C/N analysis. Areal UV-microspectrophotometry scans of ultra-thin transverse sections of an untreated control and samples impregnated with methylolated melamine formaldehyde resin at 240 nm were recorded. Additionally, photometric point measurements with a spot size of 1 μm−2 in the range 230 and 350 nm were conducted. UV-microspectrophotometry was proven as suitable technique for the quantitative analysis of wood modified with methylolated melamine formaldehyde resin.

  • 3.
    Sjökvist, Tinh
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Wålinder, Magnus E.P.
    Royal Institute of Technology, KTH.
    Blom, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Liquid sorption characterisation of Norway spruce heartwood and sapwood using a muiticycle Wilhelmy plate metho2018In: International Wood Products Journal, ISSN 2042-6445, E-ISSN 2042-6453, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multicycle Wilhelmy plate method was applied to study the water and octane sorption behaviour of small Norway spruce veneers. Dry heart- and sapwood samples of varying density were investigated. The results showed a correlation between the porosity and the sorption of octane for all samples, i.e. a higher wood porosity resulted in higher octane sorption. However, no difference in octane sorption was found between heart- and sapwood samples of similar density. The water sorption behaviour was difficult to interpret, probably due to the influence of surface-active wood extractives. It is suggested that the presence of such extractives, particularly in the sapwood samples, increases the sorption of water due to a significant decrease in its apparent surface tension. Hence, the results indicate that the liquid water sorption of spruce heart- and sapwood is strongly influenced by variations in the extractives content rather than by the micromorphology.

  • 4.
    Trischler, Johann
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. johann.trischler@lnu.se.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Anaerobic digestion of monocotyledons in particleboard production: a concept of process integration to increase substitution of wood raw material2015In: International Wood Products Journal, ISSN 2042-6445, E-ISSN 2042-6453, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 154-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this conceptual study was to introduce a possibility of integrating a surface treatment of monocotyledons by enzymes into particleboard production to provide a substitute raw material to replace wood particles. Because of the greater competition for wood as a raw material for particleboard production, there is increasing interest in monocotyledons as a substitute for wood. Monocotyledons, such as grass or cereal straw, differ from wood mostly in that they have a surface layer of waxes and embedded silica. If particles of monocotyledons are to be used in combination with wood in particleboards they must be modified. Using the concept of anaerobic digestion, it is possible to modify the surface of monocotyledon particles, having methane as a side product and to achieve a process, which leads to greater product diversity. A SWOT analysis was used to evaluate the process.

  • 5.
    Östman, Birgit
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Fire performance of wood products and timber structures2017In: International Wood Products Journal, ISSN 2042-6445, E-ISSN 2042-6453, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overview of the European requirements on fire safety in buildings is presented based on the construction products regulation and its essential requirements. These requirements are mandatory, to be used in all countries. They include classification systems for reaction to fire of building products, fire resistance of building elements and structural Eurocodes. The reaction-to-fire performance of wood products in accordance with the European classification system is given. Euroclass D is usually achieved. Higher classes can be reached by chemical treatments, but the durability of the reaction-to-fire performance needs to be fulfilled according to a new European system. The fire resistance of building elements can be either tested according to the European standards or calculated using design methods according to Eurocode 5, EN 1995-1-2. Both separating and load-bearing structures are included. Timber structures can obtain high fire resistance, e.g. REI 60, REI 90 or even higher.

  • 6.
    Östman, Birgit
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Tsantaridis, L D
    SP/RISE Technical Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Durability of the reaction to fire performance of fire-retardant-treated wood products in exterior applications: a 10-year report2017In: International Wood Products Journal, ISSN 2042-6445, E-ISSN 2042-6453, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fire retardants may considerably improve the reaction to fire properties of wood products, but the long term durability needs to be addressed. Several long term studies of fire retardant treated (FRT) wood products over time are presented. They are performed according to a European system based on earlier Nordic and North American systems and include accelerated aging according to different procedures and natural weathering up to 10 years.

    Main conclusions are:

    • The hygroscopic properties are unchanged compared to untreated wood products for most FRT wood products studied and used commercially

    • The reaction to fire properties of FRT wood may be maintained after accelerated and natural aging if the The hygroscopic properties are unchanged compared to untreated wood for most FRT wood retention levels are high enough, but several products lose most of their improved reaction to fire properties during weathering

    • Paint systems contribute considerably to weather protection and are usually needed to maintain the reaction to fire performance at exterior applications

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf