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  • 1.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Arnesson, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Dialogue in a learning process: problematization of gender equality in higher education2017In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 474-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim with the study was to describe the knowledge building that was developed in a group of students who were trained nurses enrolled in a Swedish higher education programme. With a point of departure in an interactive research approach, the authors applied the dialogue seminar as method and pedagogical model. When the students in close to practice talks, shared their thoughts about how gender and gender equality could be experienced and understood, the dialogue seminar became useable. At the analysis of the stories which the students shared at the dialogue seminars, it became clear that most of the students had an ambivalent approach to gender equality. When they reflected on gender relations, they brought out the hierarchical and separate gender relations which they experienced as existing within healthcare. Furthermore, their professional lives seemed to be embedded in gender-related practices. An important conclusion is that the students’ reflections oscillated between critical reflection on conditions and critical reflection on processes within their own practice in healthcare. Another finding was that the students’ reflections in dialogue form became important in a learning process, not least in the light of that gender relations and gender equality only to a limited degree had been included in their nurse’s education at the basic level.

  • 2.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Elmqvist, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nursing students’ and lecturers’ experiences of learning at a university-based nursing student–run health clinic2019In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 423-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to describe the phenomenon of learning at a university-based nursing student–run health clinic, as experienced by student nurses and lecturers. The study is based on a reflective lifeworld research approach founded on continental philosophy. Eight group interviews were conducted with 38 student nurses and 5 lecturers. The data were explored and analysed for meaning. The results show that learning is supported by a permissive learning environment that builds on both individual and common learning as well as equal relationships within the student group, in relation to the visitors at the health clinic and, to a certain extent, in relation to the lecturers. The most significant finding is that reflective, development-oriented learning takes place when the students, supported by each other and their lecturers, reflect on how to relate to problems and situations. A situation-based learning approach is thus shown to create the prerequisites for lecturers being nearby, reflective dialogue partners but also supervisors in situations where the students ask for support and guidance.

  • 3.
    Arnesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Reflecting talks: a pedagogical model in the learning organization2019In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 234-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to deepen the understanding of how a pedagogical model for reflecting talks can be used in order to make sustainable learning part of the daily work in the learning organization. From an interactive research approach, we have together with a project management group in a European Social Fund project worked with sustainable learning and knowledge development. Empirical data has been collected at the implementation of ten reflecting talks about sustainable equality. The results of the study lead to a strategy for how sustainable learning can become part of the daily work at a workplace. The strategy is constituted by a pedagogical model for reflecting talks, which clearly shows how sustainable learning in an organization can be structured. The core of the pedagogical model for the reflecting talks where both practically applied and theoretically anchored knowledge are important components. The learning process is based on observation, reflection, analysis and discussion of concrete situations/events. The models rests on four basic conditions; pedagogical competence, a delimited problem area, the learning group and timeframes. The model can be used in the daily work at short dialogues or at more penetrating discussions.

  • 4.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Developing a Didactic Method that Emphasizes Lifeworld as a basis for learning2009In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Special Issue: Reflective Learning: Channelling Ideas and Creating Possibilities, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The learning process in a professional education is characterized by the encounter between the student's own lifeworld and scientific knowledge in theory and in practice. Didactics is needed in order to be able to provide support for this meeting and create the conditions for a reflective process that strengthens the integration between the lifeworld and theoretical and practical knowledge. This paper presents an innovative research project where the aim was to develop a new didactic method in nursing education that makes it possible for the student to encounter both the theoretical caring science structure and the patient's lived experiences in his/her learning process. A reflective group supervision model for nursing students during clinical studies was developed and tested for the duration of two years. A teacher and a nurse led each group. The supervision started in patient narratives the students collected during their clinical practices and brought to the supervision sessions. The narratives were problematized and analysed in the supervision session using caring science terminology with the purpose of creating a unity of theory and lived experiences, thus developing a deeper understanding for the patient's situation and need. During the project, data were collected and analysed phenomenologically in order to develop knowledge of the students' reflection and learning when using the supervision model. The result shows that the students, with the help of this didactic method, have developed a better understanding of the patient and that they have had good use of the theoretical caring science in creating this understanding. They have learned to reflect more systematically and the examination has become more realistic to them as it is now carried out in a patient context. However, in order to reach these results some prerequisites are required. These can be summarized as the necessity of recognizing the students' lifeworld in the supervision process.

  • 5.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Lifeworld-based reflection and learning: a contribution to the reflective practice in nursing and nursing education.2007In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 331-343Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Caring and learning intertwined in supervision at a dedicated education unit: a phenomenological study2015In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 753-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supervising student nurses in clinical praxis entails dealing with both caring and learning aspects. There is a dearth of research focusing on both the caring and learning aspects in supervision. The present study describes how caring and learning is intertwined in supervision. The study was performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach and analyzed phenomenologically for meanings. Eight interviews were conducted with supervisors on an orthopedic-dedicated education unit. The findings reveal how supervisors constantly move in order to be either close to or standing back, adjusting to the students’ and the patients’ needs. This is described in more detail via the constituents: handling responsibility in constant movement, participating in a new and different way, coexisting with students creates meaning and development. The findings show that a reflective attitude in supervision, clear structure for daily activities, and a lifeworld-led didactics can promote a learning and caring environment. Supervisors’ demanding task requires pauses in order to maintain motivation among supervisors. A mutual link between supervisors, students and patients is crucial in order to create an environment where caring and learning are intertwined.

  • 7.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Students ’ learning in an encounter with patients – supervised in pairs of students2012In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 693-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring science didactics is the framework of a supervision model that includes students learning process, from a lifeworld perspective, in an encounter with patients, supported by supervision in pair of students. A challenge in nursing education is to bridge the gap between theory and praxis. Reflection and a model for learning and supervision enable students to learn in meeting patients and to get a deeper understanding of their lifeworld. The aim of this study was to describe the learning process of students, in an encounter with a patient, when supported by supervision given to pair of students. Data were collected through interviews and diary entries, interviews in pair of students, and diary entries in private. The analysis was based on reflective lifeworld research approach, founded on phenomenology. Results show that security and insecurity in pair of students, environmental conditions and attitude of health care professionals have influence on students’ learning process. Meeting patients is described as important for the student learning process, but also as indiscernible and that supervised reflection serves to bridge the gap between theoretical and practical knowledge. Structured supervision is shown to be supportive for nursing students when developing in their learning process.

    Keywords: caring science; learning; lifeworld; nursing students; phenomenology; reflection

  • 8.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Galvin, Kathleen
    University of Brighton, UK.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Using lifeworld philosophy in education to intertwine caring and learning: an illustration of ways of learning how to care2019In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 56-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our general purpose is to show how a philosophically oriented theoretical foundation, drawn from a lifeworld perspective can serve as a coherent direction for caring practices in education. We argue that both caring and learning share the same ontological foundation and point to this intertwining from a philosophical perspective. We proceed by illustrating shared epistemological ground through some novel educational practices in the professional preparation of carers. Beginning in a phenomenologically oriented philosophical foundation, we will first unfold what this means in the practice of caring, and secondly what it means for education and learning to care in humanly sensitive ways. We then share some ways that may be valuable in supporting learning and health that provides a basis for an existential understanding. We argue that existential understanding may offer a way to bridge the categorisations in contemporary health care that flow from problematic dualisms such as mind and body, illness and well-being, theory and practice, caring and learning. Ways of overcoming such dualistic splits and new existential understandings are needed to pave the way for a care that is up to the task of responding to both human possibilities and vulnerabilities, within the complexity of existence. As such, we argue that caring and learning are to be understood as an intertwined phenomenon of pivotal importance in education of both sensible and sensitive carers. Lifeworld led didactics and reflection, which are seen as the core of learning, constitute an important educational strategy here.

  • 9.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden;University of Borås, Sweden.
    Jarling, Aleksandra
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Thorén, Ann-Britt
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    It has given me tools to meet patients’ needs’: students' experiences of learning caring science in reflection seminars2015In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 459-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study aims to describe nursing students’ experiences of learning caring science by using reflection seminars as a didactic model. A reflective lifeworld research approach according to Husserl’s phenomenological philosophy was used. Findings suggest that reflective seminars increased understanding of caring science, other people and one’s self. Moreover, substance-oriented reflection and lifeworld perspectives provided a good learning environment. Learning prerequisites were found to be openness, honesty, respect, trust, security, justice, parity and shared responsibilities along with having a common platform and a clear framework. These findings highlight conditions for a culture conducive to learning and for gaining embodied knowledge, but also present concerns regarding the difficulty and importance of establishing a good learning environment. A need to create meaningfulness, establish caring as conscious, reflective acts and show the value in personal differences were also found. These findings offer an important perspective necessary for preparing nurses to perform good quality care.

  • 10.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Elmqvist, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    A nursing student-run health clinic: an innovative project based on reflective lifeworld-led care and education2014In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 415-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing students need support in order to be able to intertwine caring science theory with practice through reflection. In this theoretical paper a nursing student-run health clinic based on lifeworld led learning and caring is described and propounded as providing such support. The student nurses are offered possibilities for integrating theoretical and practical knowledge by the re-location of parts of the theoretical courses to this innovative learning environment. In applying a phenomenological attitude, both in the learning situation and in the caring situation, the natural (unreflective) attitude is challenged in order for the student nurses to gain a deeper and broader understanding of caring science within their caring practice and vice versa. This means that the nursing students can develop a reflective caring approach that is important in order to become both sensitive and sensible nurses. This paper can be supportive for nurse educators in developing nursing education to meet the needs of the modern society. Our perspective on health, well-being and reflective learning can also inspire persons who work in clinical practice and with health promotion.

1 - 10 of 10
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