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  • 1.
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, India.
    Removal of bromophenols from water using industrial wastes as low-cost adsorbents2007In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. B139, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Engineering (YIEST), Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710, Gangwon-do, South Korea.
    Choi, Y.H.
    Yoon, Y.J.
    Shin, Y.
    Jeon, B.H.
    Kang, J.W.
    Bromate removal from water by granular ferric hydroxide (GFH)2009In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 170, no 1, p. 134-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The feasibility of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for bromate removal from water has been studied. Batch experiments were performed to study the influence of various experimental parameters such as effect of contact time, initial bromate concentration, temperature, pH and effect of competing anions on bromate removal by GFH. The adsorption kinetics indicates that uptake rate of bromate was rapid at the beginning and 75% adsorption was completed in 5 min and equilibrium was achieved within 20 min. The sorption process was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The maximum adsorption potential of GFH for bromate removal was 16.5 mg g−1 at 25 °C. The adsorption data fitted well to the Langmuir model. The increase in OH peak and absence of Br–O bonding in FTIR spectra indicate that ion-exchange was the main mechanism during bromate sorption on GFH. The effects of competing anions and solution pHs (3–9) were negligible. Results of the present study suggest that GFH can be effectively utilized for bromate removal from drinking water.

  • 3.
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    et al.
    Environmental Science & Technology Division, Central Building Research Institute (CBRI), Roorkee 247667, India / Department of Environmental Engineering (YIEST), Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710, South Korea.
    Minocha, A.K.
    Adsorptive removal  of 2,4- dichlorophenol from water utilizing Punica granatum peel waste and stabilization with cement2009In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 168, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Eva
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Andersen, Henrik Rasmus
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Ledin, Anna
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Substance flow analysis of parabens in Denmark complemented with a survey of presence and frequency in various commodities2008In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 156, no 1-3, p. 240-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parabens are commonly used as preservatives due to anti-bactericidal and anti-fungicidal properties and they are ubiquitously present in personal care products, pharmaceuticals, food, industrial and domestic commodities. They are suspected of causing endocrine disrupting effects to aquatic organisms and adverse effects in humans and, thus, it is highly relevant to identify and quantify their sources and transportation pathways in the urban environment. Here a substance flow analysis (SFA) was performed in order to map and comprehend the substances’ flow on a national basis. Many household commodities were found to contain parabens; cleaning detergents, slimy toys, and water-based paint. The presence and concentration of parabens are regulated in cosmetics and food. Use of parabens in pharmaceuticals as excipients is documented in Denmark. The import of parabens is increasing; although the number of industrial parabens containing commodities is decreasing and manufacturer reports phase-out of parabens. The vast majority of the paraben containing commodities has a durability of 18–30 months, thus the average lifetime of the paraben stock is perceived to be limited. The inflow was ca. 154 tonnes via pure chemicals and 7.2–73 tonnes via commodities in 2004. This corresponds to an average wastewater concentration of 640–900 μg/L, when excluding discharge to solid waste, soil, biodegradation and metabolism. This is in the same order of magnitudes as can be found in industrial wastewater but higher than that seen in domestic wastewater. The data needed for the SFA is sparse, dispersed, and difficult to access and associated with a great deal of uncertainty.

  • 5.
    Filipsson, Monika
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Henningsson, Marianne
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Peltola, Pasi
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Öberg, Tomas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Exposure to contaminated sediments during recreational activities at a public bathing place2009In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 171, no 1-3, p. 200-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More and more time is spent on recreational activities, but few risk assessments focus specifically on these situations and exposure factor data are often scarce. To assess exposure to contaminants at a public bathing place in an urban environment, we have compiled literature data, conducted observation studies, and analyzed water and sediment samples. The levels of anthropogenic contaminants are high in urban environments and traffic frequently plays an important role. In this study, to characterize variability and uncertainty, the deterministic exposure calculations for metal pollutants were supplemented by a probability bounds analysis for the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The results from these calculations show that oral intake is the major exposure route for metals, while skin absorption, with present assumptions, is more important for the PAH. The presently measured levels of contaminants, at this public bathing place, cannot be anticipated to cause any significant adverse influence on public health.

  • 6. Jain, A.K
    et al.
    Gupta, V.K.
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, India.
    Suhas, S.
    Utilization of industrial waste products as adsorbents for the removal of dyes2003In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Salomon, Paulo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Granéli, Edna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Effects from log-yard stormwater runoff on the microalgae Scenedesmus subspicatus: Intra-storm magnitude and variability2011In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 185, no 2-3, p. 732-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the effects posed by stormwater runoff from an industrial log-yard on the microalgae Scenedesmus subspicatus. The effects of stormwater runoff sampled during two rain events were determined by exposing S. subspicatus cells to different concentrations (% v:v) of each sample. The effects were measured as the percentage change in growth rates in relation to a control culture after exposure times of 24, 48, 72 and 96h. The runoff from the first rain event had no negative effects to S.subspicatus, posing in most cases growth stimulation, whereas the runoff from the second rain event inhibited algae growth. Differences in runoff physico-chemical characteristics combined with the hydrological factors of each rain event explained these opposite effects. The hypothesis of toxic first flush phenomenon was confirmed in the second rain event on the basis of normalized inhibitory effects and runoff volume. It was found that 42, 51 and 50% of the inhibitory effects during exposures of 24, 48 and 72h are associated with the initial 4% of the total discharged volume. The fact that negative effects were observed in the two runoff events analyzed here, raises concern about the potential environmental threats posed by runoff originated from wood-based industrial areas during the entire hydrological year.

  • 8. Kriipsalu, Mait
    et al.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nammari, Diauddin R
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bio-treatment of oily sludge: The contribution of amendment material to the content of target contaminants and the biodegradation dynamics.2007In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 148, p. 616-622Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kumar, Eva
    et al.
    Univ Porto, Fac Engn, Dept Engn Quim, LSRE, P-4200465 Oporto, Portugal.
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    Univ Porto, Fac Engn, Dept Engn Quim, LSRE, P-4200465 Oporto, Portugal / Tech Univ Hamburg, Inst Environm Technol & Energy Econ, D-21073 Hamburg, Germany.
    Kumar, Umesh
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Chem, Tainan 701, Taiwan.
    Sillanpää, Mika
    Lappeenranta Univ Technol, Fac Technol, FI-50100 Mikkeli, Finland.
    Defluoridation from aqueous solutions by nano-alumina: Characterization and sorption studies2011In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 186, no 2-3, p. 1042-1049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of nano-alumina (Al(2)O(3)) for fluoride adsorption from aqueous solutions. The nature and morphology of pure and fluoride-sorbed nano-alumina were characterized by SEM with EDX, XRD, and FTIR analysis. Batch adsorption studies were performed as a function of contact time, initial fluoride concentration, temperature, pH and influence of competing anions. Fluoride sorption kinetics was well fitted by pseudo-second-order model. The maximum sorption capacity of nano-alumina for fluoride removal was found to be 14.0 mg g(-1) at 25 degrees C. Maximum fluoride removal occurred at pH 6.15. The fluoride sorption has been well explained using Langmuir isotherm model. Fluoride sorption was mainly influenced by the presence of PO(4)(3-), SO(4)(2-) and CO(3)(2-) ions.

  • 10.
    Ni, Gaofeng
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. European Ctr Excellence Sustainable Water Technol, Netherlands.
    Harnawan, Pebrianto
    European Ctr Excellence Sustainable Water Technol, Netherlands.
    Seidel, Laura
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Heijne, Annemiek Ter
    Wageningen Univ, Netherlands.
    Sleutels, Tom
    European Ctr Excellence Sustainable Water Technol, Netherlands.
    Buisman, Cees J. N.
    European Ctr Excellence Sustainable Water Technol, Netherlands;Wageningen Univ, Netherlands.
    Dopson, Mark
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms assist sulfide removal in a microbial electrolysis cell2019In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 363, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several industrial processes produce toxic sulfide containing streams that are often scrubbed using caustic solutions. An alternative, cost effective sulfidetreatment method is bioelectrochemical sulfide removal. For the first time, a haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing microbial consortium was introduced to the anodic chamber of a microbial electrolysis cell operated at alkaline pH and with 1.0 M sodium ions. Under anode potential control, the highest sulfideremoval rate was 2.16 mM/day and chemical analysis supported that the electrical current generation was from the sulfide oxidation. Biotic operation produced a maximum current density of 3625 mA/m(2) compared to 210 mA/m2 while under abiotic operation. Furthermore, biotic electrical production was maintained for a longer period than for abiotic operation, potentially due to the passivation of the electrode by elemental sulfur during abiotic operation. The use of microorganisms reduced the energy input in this study compared to published electrochemical sulfide removal technologies. Sulfide-oxidizing populations dominated both the planktonic and electrode-attached communities with 16S rRNA gene sequences aligning within the genera Thioctikalivibrio, Thioalkaihnicrobium, and Desulfurivibrio. The dominance of the Desulfurivibrio-like population on the anode surface offered evidence for the first haloalkaliphilic bacterium able to couple electrons from sulfide oxidation to extracellular electron transfer to the anode.

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