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  • 1.
    Brandin, Elisabeth
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Versions of 'wild' and the importance of fences in Swedish wildlife tourism involving moose2009In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Current Issues in Tourism, Vol. 12, no 5-6, p. 413-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There seems to be a trend for humans to interact with free-ranging wildlife in addition to interact with animals in parks and zoos. In Sweden, there is also an opposing spatial trend. One example is the establishment of themed moose parks where visitors can interact closely with the animals. This raises questions about the role of spatial context for how encounters between moose and humans take place, which influences the meanings of ‘wild’ moose. In this article, the meaning of ‘wild’ in Swedish wildlife tourism involving moose (Alces alces, ‘elk’ in English) is explored by a performative approach to wildlife tourism in three spatial settings of zoo, moose safari and moose park. It is argued that the meaning of ‘wild’ becomes practised as ‘exotic stranger’, ‘admired acquaintance’ or ‘close personal friend’ depending on the kind of bodily encounter that takes place within the three spatial settings. These encounters give rise to opportunities to learn and to be entertained by the moose in different ways due to variation in spatial context.

  • 2.
    Darbi, William Phanuel Kofi
    et al.
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand ; Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration, Ghana.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. University of Canterbury, New Zealand ; University of Oulu, Finland ; University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Elite interviews: critical practice and tourism2014In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 832-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elite interview method has been applied to the study of politics and policy-making and to other social and organisational contexts, although it has been relatively little applied in a formal fashion in tourism research. Nevertheless it is a method that has the potential of enhancing the quality and quantity of research data given the power and influence of elite subjects. The conduct of elite interviews suggests that there are qualitatively different aspects in interviewing ‘up’ as compared to interviewing ‘across’ or ‘down’. The article provides a review of some of the major issues involved in the conduct of elite interviews and highlights some of the tactics that researchers may use in the interview process as well as some of the potential ethical and publishing constraints. Even though there are a number of potential methodological challenges in using this method it provides a valuable approach in tourism research, especially studies that aim to understand decision-making processes, policy-making and perceptions. It is shown that individual ingenuity and reflexivity are required in order to overcome some of the challenges reported in existing studies.

  • 3.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
    Cohen, Scott A.
    Univ Surrey, UK.
    Hibbert, Julia F.
    Bournemouth Univ, UK.
    Tourism as connectedness2018In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 21, no 14, p. 1586-1600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Late modernity in developed nations is characterized by changing social and psychological conditions, including individualization, processes of competition and loneliness. Remaining socially connected is becoming increasingly important. In this situation, travel provides meaning through physical encounters, inclusion in traveller Gemeinschaft based on shared norms, beliefs and interests, and social status in societies increasingly defined by mobilities. As relationships are forged and found in mobility, travel is no longer an option, rather a necessity for sociality, identity construction, affirmation or alteration. Social contexts and the underlying motivations for tourism have changed fundamentally in late modernity: non-tourism has become a threat to self-conceptions. By integrating social and psychological perspectives, this paper expands and deepens existing travel and mobilities discussions to advance the understanding of tourism as a mechanism of social connectedness, and points to implications for future tourism research.

  • 4.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Research Centre for Sustainable Tourism, Norway.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Andersson, Ann-Christin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    The manager's dilemma: a conceptualization of online review manipulation strategies2018In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 484-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online evaluations are one of the most important innovations in tourism in recent years, often combining a review/rating (business-specific evaluation) and a ranking (inter-business comparison). As online reputation determines economic success, tourism managers may be tempted to manipulate online content. This paper presents the results from a qualitative study involving 20 hotel managers in southern Sweden, and their perspectives on manipulation. Results confirm that there exists a wide range of review manipulation strategies, many of which are difficult to control. Even though only few managers appear to systematically manipulate, online evaluations represent a significant challenge for businesses, as they introduce direct competition and foster consumer judgement cultures. It is postulated that managers will increasingly find themselves in a Prisoner's dilemma, representing a situation where engaging in manipulation is the most rational choice in an increasingly competitive market situation.

  • 5.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    J, Hultman
    Service Management, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    L, Haglund
    Service Management, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    H, Källgren
    Service Management, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    M, Revahl
    Service Management, Lund University, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Swedish air travellers and voluntary carbon offsets: towards the Co-creation of Environmental Value?2009In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is now a broad consensus that aviation is a significant contributor to global warming. One question that thus arises is whether voluntary carbon-offsetting schemes can make a significant contribution to mitigating the contribution of aviation to climate change. These schemes have seen considerable growth in recent years, even though the overall amount of emissions offset remains negligible: tour operators and airlines offering voluntary carbon offsets report that customers show limited interested in these schemes. In the light of this, the article seeks to discuss the implications of voluntary carbon-offsetting schemes as a means of compensating emissions from aviation, and goes on to assess air travellers' knowledge of and attitudes to these schemes. Structural problems that have to be overcome to create broader interest in voluntary carbon offsetting are discussed in the context of co-creation of environmental value at the level of economic transactions between individual passengers (consumers) and airlines (producers), based on a survey of Swedish air travellers.

  • 6.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University;Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Zeiss, Harald
    Harz University of Applied Sciences, Germany.
    Hall, C. Michael
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Martin-Rios, Carlos
    HES-SO University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Ram, Yael
    Ashkelon Academic College, Israel.
    Grøtte, Ivar-Petter
    Western Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    A cross-country comparison of accommodation manager perspectives on online review manipulation2019In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 22, no 14, p. 1744-1763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accommodation businesses are increasingly dependent on a limited number of reservation platforms. A significant feature of these platforms is guest evaluations, which are transformed into ratings and rankings. As the positioning of the business in comparison to competitors determines customer demand, accommodation managers have considerable interest in maintaining or improving their online reputation. One response may be to engage in manipulation strategies. This paper presents the results of a survey including 270 hotel managers in five countries, Germany, Israel, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. Managers confirm growing competition as a result of ratings and rankings, and they report that guests are increasingly aware of the importance of reviews. To avert negative online feedback impacts, managers intervene strategically. The paper discusses new market pressures, emergent consumer judgement culture and consumer citizenship, opportunities for legal redress and the emerging importance of reputation management strategies.

  • 7.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury ; Univ Oulu ; Univ Johannesburg.
    On the mobility of tourism mobilities2015In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 7-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism mobilities are increasing over time and over space. However, while overall growth is clearly of significance, there is a need for a greater interrogation of some of the underlying assumptions made with respect to the nature of tourism mobility in the highly North American and Eurocentric English language tourism literature. Therefore, closer examination of mobilities in the so-called emerging economies that are becoming of growing importance with respect to aggregate tourism consumption and production may shed significant light on our understandings of tourism and associated mobilities.

  • 8.
    Kim, Myung Ja
    et al.
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand;Univ Oulu, Finland;Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Investment crowdfunding in the visitor economy: the roles of venture quality, uncertainty, and funding amount2019In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investment crowdfunding is a growing means to finance startups and small businesses, including in the visitor economy (tourism, leisure, sports, creative media, arts, and culture). However, research on investor behaviour in investment crowdfunding is extremely limited in this area, particularly with respect to the impacts of venture quality, uncertainty, and funding amounts. To investigate this gap, a comprehensive and integrated model on the effects of venture quality and uncertainty level is developed and tested on crowdfunding participation in investing in visitor economy projects in South Korea. Results show that venture quality and uncertainty level had significantly positive impacts on crowdfunding participation which, in turn, highly influences word-of-mouth and re-participation. The funding amount invested was found to moderate the relationships among those constructs in the research model. Consequently, this study offers new insights for researchers and industry stakeholders in investment crowdfunding in the tourism and leisure sectors.

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