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  • 1.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    The Incubus Paradox: Attempts at Foundational Rethinking of the “SME Support Genre”2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1135-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the lacking scientific support regarding efficiency, public authorities launch and owner-managers' participate in public support programmes. Previous research has failed to address this enigma and dissolve the underlying paradox. Drawing on mythical inspiration, this article offers a framework grounded on the medieval demonic character of incubus/subbuci, by means of which this incubus paradox is analytically treated. Empirically, an indirect approach based on inserting a fictive case into a general focus-group method is adopted, thus avoiding leading questions. Two images of the small-business support syndrome emerge from the proposed mythical framework: The first one, which could be named just “incubus” ascribes malevolence to the helpers and a good deal of naivety on the part of the support programme participants. The second one, the paradox, suggests that there will be no measurable growth effect of support measures since none of the stakeholders identified in this discourse intend to actually foster development and growth in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The field material indicates that these two images jointly provide a comprehensive understanding, that there is not an incubus and a victim but rather several incubuses operating within the confines of a support programme. Thus, instead of claiming that the support agents are malevolent, the conclusion is that they have their own agenda. Since our inquiry, in addition indicates that this is true also for the participating SME representatives, they can hardly be seen as victims in the traditional sense. They rather exploit an arena where it is possible to strengthen one's own identity as responsible business persons bringing financial support to their region.

  • 2.
    Fredin, Sabrina
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Jogmark, Marina
    Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Local culture as a context for entrepreneurial activities2017In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1556-1574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how an industrial legacy leads to the formation of a distinct local culture and how the culture's survival provides a context for the subsequent entrepreneurial activities in new local industries. The discussion about culture as a key driver of entrepreneurship and economic growth is well established in the academic debate. However, we know little about how culture is formed. Through a qualitative case study of two polar Swedish cities, the study highlights four key factors which are instrumental in the formation of local culture: initial conditions, characteristics of key players, network activities and composition of newcomers. We show how the local entrepreneurs responded to the underlying assumptions of the two different cultures.

  • 3.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Lindholm-Dahlstrand, Åsa
    Bridging the Functional and Territorial Rationales: Proposing and Integrating Framework for Regional Dynamics’2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1117-1133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Regional development by means of broadened entrepreneurship2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1205-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
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