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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Ali
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Hammarstedt, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Sexual orientation and earnings: A register data-based approach to identify homosexuals2010In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 835-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [nb]

    This paper examines earnings differentials between homo- and heterosexual individuals by identifying sexual orientation with the help of information from register data. Register data enable us to avoid the misclassifications of sexual orientation often mentioned as a potential bias in survey-based studies. The results show that gay men are at an earnings disadvantage as compared to male heterosexuals while the earnings differential between lesbians and heterosexual women is very small. Our results are in line with results from previous research but are more reliable since we use a more reliable measure of sexual orientation than previous research.

  • 2.
    Heidrich, Stefanie
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Intergenerational mobility in Sweden: a regional perspective2017In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 1241-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I employ high quality register data to present new facts about income mobility in Sweden. The focus of the paper is on regional differences in mobility, using a novel approach based on a multilevel model. This method is well suited when regions differ greatly in population size, as is the case in Sweden. The maximum likelihood estimates are substantially more precise than those obtained by running separate OLS regressions. I find that few regions are statistically significantly different from the Swedish average when measuring mobility in relative terms, while a greater number of regional differences emerge when focusing on absolute outcomes. Compared to growing up in the least favorable region, children from the most favorable region with parents located at the 25th percentile in the income distribution reach higher income ranks corresponding to approximately one monthly salary for an average Swedish worker per year.

  • 3.
    Lindh, Thomas
    et al.
    Institute for Futures Studies, P.O. Box 591, 10131, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, 10691, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Demography and housing demand: What can we learn from residential construction data?2008In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 521-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are obvious reasons why residential construction should depend on the population’s age structure. We estimate this relation on Swedish time series data and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development panel data. Large groups of young adults are associated with higher rates of residential construction, but there is also a significant negative effect from those above 75. Age effects on residential investment are robust and forecast well out-of-sample in contrast to the corresponding house price results. This may explain why the debate around house prices and demography has been rather inconclusive. Rapidly aging populations in the industrialized world makes the future look bleak for the construction industry.

  • 4.
    Lundborg, Petter
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, Anton
    Lund University, Sweden;Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics. Stockholm University, Sweden;Institute for the Study of Labor, Germany.
    The health-schooling relationship: evidence from Swedish twins2016In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 1191-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health and education are known to be highly correlated, but the mechanisms behind the relationship are not well understood. In particular, there is sparse evidence on whether adolescent health may influence educational attainment. Using a large registry dataset of twins, including comprehensive information on health status at the age of 18 and later educational attainment, we investigate whether health predicts final education within monozygotic (identical) twin pairs. We find no evidence of this and conclude that health in adolescence may not have an influence on the level of schooling. Instead, raw correlations between adolescent health and schooling appear to be driven by genes and twin-pair-specific environmental factors.

  • 5.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Ekberg, Jan
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Unemployment and Earnings for Second Generation Immigrants in Sweden - Ethnic Background and Parent Composition2003In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 787-814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sheds light on the labour market outcomes of children born to immigrants in the destination country, i.e. second generation immigrants. The study has the advantage of being able to (i) identify several different ethnic backgrounds and (ii) identify the parent composition, i.e. whether one or both parents of the individual are foreign born. The labour market outcomes of second generation immigrants mirror those of first generation immigrants in that we find heterogeneity in labour market outcomes to be associated with ethnic background. Moreover, these outcomes, especially for Southern and non-European backgrounds, are much worse than those for native-born with a Swedish background. Finally, the outcome is more favourable if one parent is born in Sweden compared to having both parents foreign born, especially if the mother is native born. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

  • 6.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    IFAU (Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    University of Kalmar, Baltic Business School.
    Shifts in attitudes and labor market discrimination: Swedish experiences after 9-112005In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 603-629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present longitudinal survey data suggesting that the terrorist attacks in the USA on September 11, 2001, changed attitudes toward certain minorities in Sweden. This finding is consistent with results in previous studies. To investigate whether this change in attitudes also affected the labor market situation of these minorities, we study unemployment exit around 9-11 using detailed data on the entire Swedish working-age population. Contrary to what may be expected from many theories of labor market discrimination, the time pattern of exits and entries for different ethnic groups, as well as difference-in-differences analyses, shows no sign of increased discrimination toward these minorities. A possible explanation for this result is that employers act rationally in their hiring decisions and do not respond to changes in attitudes toward immigrants as a group.

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