lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cohen, Scott A
    et al.
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Gössling, Stefan
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund University.
    A darker side of hypermobility2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 1660-1679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the formulation of the mobilities paradigm, research has shown that movement is increasingly at the heart of our social identities. This paper argues that mobility, and indeed, hypermobility, constitutes to a growing extent who we are, whilst societal perspectives on mobility increasingly dictate how we need to move in time and space in order to accrue network capital. In this critical review, deeply embedded mechanisms of the social glamorization of mobility are uncovered, and juxtaposed with what we call a ‘darker side’ of hypermobility, including the physiological, psychological, emotional and social costs of mobility for individuals and societies. The paper concludes that whilst aspects of glamorization in regard to mobility are omnipresent in our lives, there exists an ominous silence with regard to its darker side.

  • 2.
    Gren, Martin
    et al.
    Karlstad universitet.
    Zierhofer, Wolfgang
    The Unity of Difference: a critical appraisal of corporeality in Nilkas Luhmann´s theory of social systems in the context of corporeality and spatiality2003In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 615-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Niklas Luhmann was one of the most innovative and productive social theorists of the 20thcentury. He developed a comprehensive and distinctive social theory and his ideas have enrichedmany disciplines. Yet, only few geographers have engaged with his work. Convinced of its qualities,our intention is to stimulate a critical reception of his theory among human geographers. Herean introduction into his theory of social systems is provided, and the possibilities for a geographyof social systems is explored. A key element of our proposal is a differential notion of space as apossibility of distinction, which complements Luhmann's epistemological notion of time. Our conclu-sion is that a geography of social systems would have to set out conceptually from accessibilitysystems, which are systems that encompass communications, their necessary physical and ecologicalenvironment, as well as their coordination in various dimensions of space and time

  • 3.
    Gössling, Stefan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Nilsson, J.H
    Frequent Flyer Programmes and the Reproduction of Mobility.2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, no 42, p. 241-252Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Therborn, Göran
    University of Cambridge.
    End of a paradigm: the current crisis and the idea of stateless cities2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 272-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban studies in the social sciences have for two decades been driven by a hegemonic conception, under slightly different, competing labels: world city, global city, and world city networks. While making important cognitive contributions, it has, I argue, been fundamentally flawed in assuming nation-states and state-processed national economies to be unimportant to the world economy and to world/global cities. While in several ways enriching urban knowledge, its dominance has also impoverished urban research by reducing cities to zip codes of firms and labour markets, leaving out that cities are also places of meaningful built environments, in which people live and interact. Basic assumptions and arguments of the world/global city idea by the three most distinguished representatives of the approach John Friedmann, Saskia Sassen, and Peter J Taylor are critically scrutinized. The current economic crisis has demonstrated these assumptions and arguments about cities in the world economy as untenable. The economic crisis is spawning a paradigmatic crisis, which should be seen as an opportunity for wider views of cities to be opened up.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf