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  • 1.
    Berner, Jessica
    et al.
    Blekinge University of Technology.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Blekinge University of Technology.
    Jogreus, Claes
    Blekinge University of Technology.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Blekinge University of Technology.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet ; Stockholm University.
    Wahlberg, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet ; Stockholm University.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lund University.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge University of Technology.
    Factors influenceing internet usage in older adults (65 years and above) living in rural and urban Sweden2015In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 237-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults living in rural and urban areas have shown to distinguish themselves in technology adoption;a clearer profile of their Internet use is important in order to provide better technological and health-caresolutions. Older adults’ Internet use was investigated across large to midsize cities and rural Sweden. Thesample consisted of 7181 older adults ranging from 59 to 100 years old. Internet use was investigated withage, education, gender, household economy, cognition, living alone/or with someone and rural/urban living.Logistic regression was used. Those living in rural areas used the Internet less than their urban counterparts.Being younger and higher educated influenced Internet use; for older urban adults, these factors as well asliving with someone and having good cognitive functioning were influential. Solutions are needed to avoid theexclusion of some older adults by a society that is today being shaped by the Internet.

  • 2.
    Berner, Jessica
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Jogreus, Claes
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola.
    Factors associated with change in Internet usage of the swedish older adults between 2004 and 20102012In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 152-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The increased reliance on Internet use in social functions has presumably left out a part of the population: the oldest-older adults. These are people who have not kept themselves up to date with the technological developments for various reasons. There are, however, exceptions from whom we have something to learn. This study investigates the older people in Sweden who started to use the Internet over a period of 6 years. Cognition, extraversion, openness, functional disability, household economy, sex, age and education were investigated in relation to starting to use the Internet. A chi-square test, Spearman correlation and a logistic regression analysis were conducted. It was found that higher cognition, being male and being between the ages of 60 and 80 years were determining factors in starting to use the Internet for the Swedish older adult. Our results indicate that the oldest-older adults are slow to adapt to using the Internet and more attention should be paid on how to support this group.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå universitet.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice - the views of nurses and nursing students2014In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 220-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses’ and nursing students’ views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  • 4.
    Petersson, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield.
    Evaluation and implementation of e-health and health information initiatives: international perspectives2010In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 161-163Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest2016In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPACTM Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. 

  • 6.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, Peter A.
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Vital sign documentation in electronic records: the development of workarounds2018In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 206-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workarounds are commonplace in health care settings. An increase in the use of electronic health records (EHR) has led to an escalation of workarounds as health care professionals cope with systems which are inadequate for their needs. Closely related to this, the documentation of vital signs in EHR has been problematic. The accuracy and completeness of vital sign documentation has a direct impact on the recognition of deterioration in a patient’s condition. We examined work flow processes to identify workarounds related to vital signs in a 372-bed hospital in Sweden. In three clinical areas a qualitative study was performed with data collected during observations and interviews and analysed through thematic content analysis. We identified paper workarounds in the form of hand-written notes and a total of eight pre-printed paper observation charts. Our results suggested that nurses created workarounds to allow a smooth workflow and to ensure patients safety.

  • 7.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Johansson, Pauline
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nurses' experience of using electronic patient records in everyday practice: a literature review2010In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic patient record (EPR) systems have a huge impact onnursing documentation. Although the largest group of end-usersof EPRs, nurses have had minimal input in their design. Thisstudy aimed to review current research on how nurses experienceusing the EPR for documentation. A literature search was conductedin Medline and Cinahl of original, peer-reviewed articles from2000 to 2009, focusing on nurses in acute/ inpatient ward settings.After critical assessment, two quantitative and three qualitativearticles were included in the study. Results showed that nursesexperience widespread dissatisfaction with systems. Currentsystems are not designed to meet the needs of clinical practiceas they are not user-friendly, resulting in a potentially negativeimpact on individualized care and patient safety. There is anurgent need for nurses to be directly involved in software designto ensure that the essence and complexity of nursing is notlost in the system.

  • 8.
    Throfast, Victoria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Hellström, Lina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Hovstadius, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Ericson, Lisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    e-Learning for the elderly on drug utilization: a pilot study2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 227-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the attitudes of elderly people to the use of electronic educational technology (e-learning) on drug utilization, with particular emphasis on the layout, usability, content, and level of knowledge in the tool. e-Learning modules were evaluated by a group of elderly people (aged ⩾65 years, n = 16) via a questionnaire comprising closed and open-ended questions. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses of the responses showed mostly positive reviews. The results indicate that the e-learning modules are a suitable tool for distributing information and education and that they can be managed by elderly individuals who are familiar with computers, allowing them to learn more about medication use.

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