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  • 1.
    Emilson, Anette
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Folkesson, Anne-Mari
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Children's participation and teacher control2006In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 176, no 3 & 4, p. 219-238Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Hedlin, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    ‘They only see their own child’: An interview study of preschool teachers’ perceptions about parents2019In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 189, no 11, p. 1776-1785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate how preschool teachers see their interaction with the home. The empirical material consists of semi-structured interviews with 30 qualified preschool teachers working in Swedish preschools. The informants describe how they promote cooperation and prevent conflict by clarifying that parents’ comments are welcome. They also try to grant parents’ requests regarding their own children; however, the informants also speak about parents having views about what should happen with the whole group and how the teachers should carry out their job, such as parents telling the preschool teachers whether they should hold their activities indoors or outdoors. Highly educated and well-off parents can express comments and demands in a way as if they want to decide how the work in the preschool is planned and carried out. A contrasting challenge is when parents with a non-Swedish background have language difficulties that can hinder cooperation.

  • 3.
    Hedlin, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gunnarsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Preschool student teachers, technology, and gender: positive expectations despite mixed experiences from their own school days2014In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 184, no 12, p. 1948-1959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool curriculum emphasises preschool teachers' task to stimulate children's interest in science and technology. Technology education, however, has not always had a given place in Swedish early childhood education, and this has been associated with female preschool teachers' fear of technology. This qualitative study explores how students training to be teachers in Swedish preschool view both the technology education they themselves received during their school days and their future task of teaching technology in preschool. The study's empirical material is an assignment that the students did within their Preschool Teacher Programme. Seventy-nine students, including 77 women and 2 men, described their experiences in writing. Many students describe a boring technology education which made them, as girls, feel marginalised. However, there were also those who felt quite at ease with their technology classes. Nevertheless, the students, regardless of their former experiences, have a positive attitude towards the task of teaching technology. Technology education in preschool is viewed as something quite different from the technology education they themselves had in school. The students stress that technology in early childhood education should be something that children and preschool teachers explore together.

  • 4.
    Hedlin, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Åberg, Magnus
    Karlstad university.
    Fussy girls and chattering women: The construct and subordination of femininity in preschool teacher training2018In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 188, no 2, p. 220-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in Western countries generally, most preschool teachers are women. This fact sometimes leads to the assumption that preschools are “feminine”, and that this might be bad for boys. We challenge this assumption. Using a gender critical approach we have studied preschool student teachers. “Femininity” might be used as a rhetorical and demeaning stereotype by them. Women and femininity however, are not interchangeable concepts. Failure to acknowledge this can pave the way for subtle sexism against girls and women. Our argument is supported by ethnographic observations and interviews with student teachers. By means of a Foucauldian genealogical analysis we uncover the conditions of possibility for two long-lasting feminine stereotypes. One stereotype argues that young girls should never fuss. The other claims that women are chattering gossipers. Our study shows that these archaic notions persist in Swedish preschool teacher training, despite its long tradition of work for gender equality.

  • 5.
    Hedlin, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Åberg, Magnus
    Centrum för Genusforskning, Karlstad universitet.
    The call for more male preschool teachers: Echoed and questioned by Swedish student teachers2013In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 183, no 1, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries, more men in preschools are called for. In this article, we explore how Swedish students understand the talk about recruiting more male preschool teachers, and how they agree with or challenge dominant notions of femininity and masculinity through their understanding. Interviews were conducted with female and male student teachers who were aiming at working in preschools. The results show that gender stereotypes and common-sense phrases are both adopted and challenged in the students’ discussions. Many students, both female and male, welcome male teachers because men are expected to add something to preschools. Furthermore, male teachers are widely appreciated in a way that female teachers are not. However, other students, both female and male, highlight and question the simplification that often comes with the call for more men. These students question the one-sided focus on gender. They also object to the gender division that may occur in gender-mixed work groups.

  • 6.
    Hofslundsengen, Hilde
    et al.
    Western Norway University of Applies Sciences, Norway.
    Magnusson, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Svensson, Ann-Katrin
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Jusslin, Sofia
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Mellgren, Elisabeth
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hagtvet, Bente E.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Heilä-Ylikallio, Ria
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    The literacy environment of preschool classrooms in three Nordic countries: challenges in a multilingual and digital society2020In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 190, no 3, p. 414-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the physical literacy environment of preschools in three Nordic countries. The environments were assessed using an observation protocol in a total of 131 classrooms with children aged between one and seven in Sweden, Norway and Finland. The results showed that children’s books were common and accessible in all three countries. Half of the preschools had a writing centre, and digital devices were available in less than half of them. Multilingual children were present in 82% of the classrooms, but texts and books in the multilingual children’s first languages were rare. Taken together, the results suggest that children’s books were the main gateway to literacy in these preschools, while artefacts supporting writing skills and digital literacy were less common. The findings indicate that the physical environment in these preschools did not reflect the ongoing societal changes towards increased multimodal literacy.

  • 7.
    Ree, Marianne
    et al.
    University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Emilson, Anette
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Participation in communities in ECEC expressed in child-educator interactions2019In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to contribute to knowledge about children’s opportunities to participate in early childhood education and care (ECEC) communities. The study focuses on the communication between educators and children in ECEC settings and how the communication forms condition children’s opportunities to participate in the community. The research questions are: What kind of communication patterns occur in educator and child interactions and how do these influence children’s opportunities to participate in the ECEC community? How can the communication patterns and the opportunities for participation in a community be understood from a lifeworld and a system perspective? Theoretically, the study is based on Habermas’s (1995) social philosophical perspective and the way he views the world from both a lifeworld and a system perspective. His concepts of communicative and strategic action guide the study in the purpose to identify and interpret communication patterns. The data consist of video observations of educators and children in everyday interactions in three Norwegian ECEC institutions. The analysis generated three main categories representing different communication patterns and participation opportunities in the community: (a) controlling communication – limited participation, (b) supportive communication – passive participation, and (c) co-operative communication – mutual participation. The findings show a priority in early childhood education on the individual child and a goal-oriented practice where the educator controls the communication and, by that, the children’s lifeworlds.

  • 8.
    Sivberg, Bengt
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lundqvist, Pia
    Lund University.
    Johanson, Ingmarie
    Lund University.
    Nordström, Berit
    Lund University.
    Persson, Bengt A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Screening of infants at eight months for atypical development in primary health care in southern Sweden2016In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 186, no 2, p. 287-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Screening studies of a population in primary health care are sparsely reported. The aim was to describe observed atypical behaviours that may be associated with autism spectrum conditions, in a population (n = 4329) of infants at eight months. Observations were performed by paediatric nurses. An observational instrument, named SEEK developed for child health care, was used focusing on social interaction, communication, motor skills, and an interview with parents. The analysis contains descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and a logistic regression model (cut-point 8 SEEK points). Infants scoring 8 points or more were observed a second time by psychologists and judged to be in the risk zone for atypical development. Delayed reaction to stimuli and preverbal language development were significant atypical behaviours together with deficits in communication skills, the latter more often among boys than girls. However, 7% scored 4 points or more indicating minor developmental problems. Catching early signs are crucial for both proactive care and intervention. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

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