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  • 1.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University.
    Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 236-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n=16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others, which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness.

  • 2.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    IMH, Avd för omvårdnad, Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping.
    Arvidsson, Hans
    IMH, Avd för Omvårdnad, Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Core components in the care of immigrants with psychoses:: A Delphi survey of patients, families, and health-care staff.2011In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 174-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify core components in the care of immigrants with psychosis in Sweden. Experts (n = 43) from different perspectives (immigrants, families, and health-care staff) were assembled and used to score the importance of statements regarding components in the care for a person with psychosis in three questionnaire rounds. After each round, the opinions were consolidated and compared to identify whether consensus was reached. Consensus was reached about the importance of being treated on equal terms, regardless of country of birth. Staff interest and respect, shown in different ways of understanding, was valued. Consensus could not be reached on approximately half of the statements, of which four tended to be ranked towards unimportant. Those included that staff should have specific cultural knowledge or that the patient should be allowed to decide whether to be cared for by male or female staff. Nor was it regarded as important to identify a person's religious or ethnic background. The results illustrate the importance of fundamental psychiatric nursing, which should enable nurses to identify and meet the basic needs of all patients, regardless of country of origin. Areas for which consensus was not reached illustrate a future challenge for health-care staff to identify situations when cultural clashes could appear. Staff should have strategies to accomplish cultural negotiations to build an effective treatment alliance with the patient, as well as the family, to meet individual needs.

  • 3.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Foreign-born and Swedish-born families' perceptions of psychosis care.2009In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 62-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe how foreign-born and Swedish born families living in Sweden perceive psychosis care. Methods: Eleven foreign-born and 15 Swedish-born family members were interviewed. Data were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. Findings: Three main descriptive categories were found: taking responsibility, access to care, and attitudes to psychosis. The degree of responsibility in the family decreased if there was easy access to care and support from health-care staff. Knowledge of psychosis was considered to be important in order to counteract prejudiced attitudes in the family and the community. Foreign-born families did not want to be treated differently from Swedes and stressed the importance of finding ways to communicate despite communication barriers. Foreign-born families also were affected by their experiences of psychiatric care and different beliefs about psychosis in their home country. Conclusion: The results indicate how important it is that health-care staff members treat families on equal terms. It is necessary to take the time to identify how to communicate in a good manner and to identify families' previous experiences of and beliefs about psychosis care in order to help families face prejudice in society and to see beyond the psychosis.

  • 4.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Community health-care staff's experiences of support to prevent type 2 diabetes among people with psychosis: An interview study with health staff.2012In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 480-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe mental health staff experiences of giving support to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) among people with psychosis in community psychiatry. A qualitative interview study with a purposeful sample of 12 community health staff was conducted. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results show how staff reported continuously supporting people with psychosis to adapt to healthy lifestyles, but stated that support is not given until after a person becomes overweight or is diagnosed with type 2 DM. Support was described as a never-ending process of motivation facing many reverses. Individually-adapted support given in practical situations was perceived as most successful. Cooperation between health-care organizations was seen as essential, but inadequate. Limitations in income and social network, and easy access to fast food and alcohol, were seen as obstacles to support. The results indicate that community health staff are in a position to make a considerable impact in motivating and supporting healthy lifestyle changes in practical situations in daily life among people with psychosis. This study raises awareness of how community health staff's support can be useful when developing nursing skills and health-care plans for people with psychosis.

  • 5.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Axelsson, Åsa
    Clients’ perceptions of client-nurse relationships in local authority psychiatric services:: A qualitative study.2004In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mental Health Care reform in Sweden aimed, among other things, to improve the possibilities for persons with mental illnesses to experience companionship and participation in society. The aim of the study was to describe how persons suffering from mental illness perceive their relationships with nursing staff in local authority psychiatric services. Data were collected through semi-structured recorded interviews with 17 strategically chosen clients. A qualitative approach inspired by phenomenography was used to analyse the data. The analysis resulted in four main categories and 13 subcategories. The main categories were: security, companionship, confirmation and development.

  • 6.
    Rusner, Marie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Towards a more liveable life for close relatives of individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder2013In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 162-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The life of close relatives of persons with bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with emotional distress, depression and a high level of use of mental health care. Illness-related changes of the life situation endanger relationships, social life, finances and occupational functioning. Understanding of facilitating conditions for close relatives is still a neglected research area. The aim of the present study was thus to explore what makes the life of close relatives of persons with BD more liveable. A lifeworld phenomenological approach was used. The findings reveal that keeping distance, having stability in everyday life and strengthening equality through transparent communication are conditions that enable close relatives to influence the unpredictable and its consequences and thus make life more liveable. This implies contributions from close relatives, the person with BD and the caring services. We propose that healthcare support should not be divided in support for the patient and/or the close relatives but instead be designed as support for the 'patient and close relatives' as a unit. Professional caregivers need to take responsibility for creating intersubjective settings for the person with BD and their close relatives to share their needs and make joint plans for how to influence the illness-related life issues.

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