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  • 1. Beck, Inger
    et al.
    Runeson, Ingrid
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Blomqvist, Kerstin
    To find inner peace: soft massage as an estabished and integrated part of palliative care2009In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 541-545Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Health-promoting conversations about hope and suffering with couples in palliative care2008In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 439-445Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Olav
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Söderman, Annika
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Sweden;Region Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Translating the Patient Dignity Inventory2019In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 334-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI) is based on an empirically-driven dignity model that has been developed and used for clinically assessing the various sources of dignity-related distress. In a recent review, it received the highest score as a useful instrument in both practice and research in palliative care. The PDI has been adapted to and validated for use in various countries, but not yet Sweden. Aims: To translate the PDI into Swedish, including cultural adaptation for clinical use. Methods: A multi-step process of translation, negotiated consensus, expert group discussion (n=7: four invited experts and three researchers) and cognitive interviewing (n=7: persons with palliative care needs). Findings: Discussion, by the expert reviewers, of both linguistic and cultural issues regarding the content and readability of the translated Swedish version resulted in revisions of items and response alternatives, focusing mainly on semantic, conceptual, and experiential equivalence. A pilot version for cognitive interviews was produced. The analysis of data showed that most of the items were judged to be relevant by the persons with palliative care needs. Conclusion: The process of translation and adaptation added clarity and consistency. The Swedish version of the PDI can be used in assessing dignity-related distress. The next step will be to test this Swedish version for psychometric properties in a larger group of patients with palliative care needs before use in research.

  • 4.
    Bylund-Grenklo, Tove
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Sweden;Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Uppsala university, Sweden;Örebro university, Sweden.
    Dignity in life and care: the perspectives of Swedish patients in a palliative care context.2019In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 193-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: How patients preserve their sense of dignity in life is an important area of palliative care that remains to be explored.

    AIMS: To describe patients' perspectives of what constitutes a dignified life within a palliative care context.

    METHODS: Twelve palliative care patients were interviewed about their views on living with dignity. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: What constitutes a dignified life during end-of-life care was captured by the theme 'I may be ill but I am still a human being' and presented under the categories 'preserving my everyday life and personhood', 'having my human value maintained by others through 'coherence' and 'being supported by society at large'.

    CONCLUSION: Patients' sense of dignity can be preserved by their own attitudes and behaviours, by others and through public support. Health professionals need to adopt a dignity-conserving approach, for which awareness of their own attitudes and behaviours is crucial.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Ansgar Theological Seminary, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Berggren, Ingela
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Community nurses’ experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative care:: A Swedish study2010In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 224-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate community nurses’ experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative care.Background: There are many studies on palliative care but research on how communitynurses experience ethical dilemmas in palliative home care is lacking.The ethical dilemmas to which these nurses are exposed seriouslychallenge their ethical competence.Method: Seven community nurses described their experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative home care.The data was analysed by means of qualitative content analysis.Findings :The core themes that emerged were: powerlessness, frustration, and concern in relation to ethical dilemmas in palliative care. The nurses were motivated and felt responsibility for their patients’ end of life, and relatives, and took their duties seriously. They wanted to satisfy all parties; the patient, the relatives and other palliative care professionals and deal with such issues. The study confirms the need for knowledge about how community nurses experience dilemmas in ethical decision-making. They have the freedom to act and the willingness to make decisions, but they lack competence and knowledge about how their colleagues experience

     

  • 6.
    Svensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Ingrid
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Patient perceptions of specialised hospital-based palliative home care: a qualitative study using a phenomenographical approach2018In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Specialised palliative care is given around the clock to palliative patients who have severe symptoms or special needs. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe patients' perceptions of what it is like to be cared for by a specialised palliative care team within hospital-based palliative home care (HPHC). Method: A qualitative method with semi-structured interviews was used. Fourteen patients enrolled in HPHC at a unit for specialised palliative care linked to the hospital in the southeast of Sweden participated. The analysis was performed with a phenomenographical approach. Results: Four description categories were identified: 'it is safe to receive care at home,' 'support and commitment', 'having access to a multiprofessional team', and 'how HPHC changes everyday life'. To be cared for by HPHC was perceived as safe, and the patients thought that having access to competent staff who supported them around the clock had improved their care and daily life. Conclusion: The need for specialised palliative care will likely grow with an ageing population and this form of care was perceived as functioning well.

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