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  • 1.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Health Effects of an Individualized Lifestyle Intervention for People with Psychotic Disorders in Psychiatric Outpatient Services: A Two Year Follow-up2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with psychotic disorders experience to a great extent avoidable physical illnesses and early mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential effects for this group of participating in a lifestyle intervention. A multi-component nurse-led lifestyle intervention using quasi-experimental design was performed. Changes in biomedical and clinical measurements, self-reported health, symptoms of illness and health behavior were investigated. Multilevel modeling was used to statistically test differences in changes over time. Statistically significant changes were found in physical activity, HbA1c and waist circumference. A lifestyle intervention for people with severe mental illness can be beneficial for increasing physical activity.

  • 2.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University.
    Health risks among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 585-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital.

  • 3.
    Brolin, Rosita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Baigi, Amir
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Satisfaction with housing and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of satisfaction with housing and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities in Sweden. A total of 370 residents, in supported housing and in ordinary housing with housing support, completed a new questionnaire and reported a high degree of overall satisfaction, but many of them wanted to move somewhere else. Differences were found between the two different types of housing concerning satisfaction with housing support, social life and available choices. Security and privacy, as well as other's influence on the choice of residential area and dwelling proved to be important predictors for satisfaction.

  • 4.
    Brolin, Rosita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Syrén, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Validity and reliability of a Swedish questionnaire for assessing satisfaction with housing and housing support for persons with psychiatric disabilities2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 731-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of a questionnaire for studying satisfaction with housing and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities. Most items were gathered from English language questionnaires. These were translated and adapted to a Swedish context and items concerning housing support were added. Two studies were conducted. The first, a test-retest reliability analysis, was performed in a pilot study with 53 participants; in the second study, which had 370 participants, a five factor solution with good internal consistency emerged. Further development of the questionnaire is discussed.

  • 5.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    The ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital in Sweden2008In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 221-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory study aims to investigate the ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a forensic psychiatric context in the light of Moos’ conceptualization of the treatment setting.

    The wards for female patients bore similarities to Relationship-Oriented and Insight-Oriented programmes and had a generally positive ward atmosphere. On the other hand the wards for male patients did not resemble any treatment programme and had a more mixed diagnosis profile than those for female patients. Comparisons of the two types of wards are made and implications of the findings in terms of the overriding principle of normalization are discussed.

  • 6.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    A suggested revision of the Community Oriented Program Environmental Scale (COPES) for measuring the psychosocial environment of supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities.2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to address issues of construct validity and reliability of a revised short version of the COPES instrument to measure the psychosocial environment of supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities. The results revealed that the division into subscales is not sufficiently reliable for use in measuring the psychosocial environment, although the three higher order dimensions can possibly be used for the descriptive and comparative purposes. A factor analysis based on the revised short version generated new factor solutions, differing from the COPES subscales, but with sufficient psychometric properties.

  • 7.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Schroder, Agneta
    Örebro University, Sweden;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 697-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The residents' perspective of the quality of housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing has been studied and a comparison has been made with the findings from those from a previous study in ordinary housing with outreach support. One-hundred and seventy-eight residents from 27 supported housing facilities in eight Swedish municipalities completed the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) instrument. The highest quality ratings were found for: Secluded Environment, Encounter and Support, while Participation, Housing Specific and Secure Environment were rated at lower levels. Despite relatively high ratings, a majority of items did not attain the 80% cutoff point deemed as defining satisfactory quality of service. The residents in ordinary housing with outreach support rated higher levels for the majority of the QPC-H dimensions in comparison with those in supported housing. A conclusion is that the quality of care in supported housing facilities has a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Supported housing is generally rated as having a lower quality of care than in ordinary housing with outreach support. Suggestions for the content of staff training are made based on the results.

  • 8. Carlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Helena
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Patients longing for authentic personal care: A phenomenological study of violent encounters in psychiatric settings.2005In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 287-305Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College;Swedish Family Care Competence Centre, Sweden.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Swedish Family Care Competence Centre, Sweden.
    Support interventions for family members of adults with mental illness: a narrative literature review2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 768-780Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this review was to describe research related to support interventions for adult family members of people with mental illness and the significance that support may have. The results indicate the importance of flexible and individualized forms of support from both professionals and people with personal experience as a family member of someone with mental illness. In many cases, the intervention studies revealed that family members' burden decreased, their knowledge of the disease and treatment increased, and their ability to cope with the situation was improved. The results highlight the importance of support both from professionals and peers.

  • 10.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    'The art of understanding in forensic psychiatric care': from a caring science perspective based on a lifeworld approach2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 802-809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients in forensic psychiatric clinics are a vulnerable and exposed patient group due to suffering from a severe mental disorder, having committed a crime and being cared for against their will in an institutional environment with a high level of security. The art of understanding in forensic psychiatric care is discussed from a caring science perspective, based on a lifeworld approach. The aim is to contribute knowledge that can support staff, who daily meet patients on forensic psychiatric wards, in applying a caring attitude.

  • 11.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sjögren, Reet
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    To be Strategically Struggling against Resignation: The Lived Experiences of Being Cared for in Forensic Psychiatric Care2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 743-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To be referred tocare in forensic psychiatric services can be seen as one of the mostcomprehensive encroachments society can impose upon a person’s life, as itentails a limitation of the individual’s freedom with no time limit. This study focuses upon patients’ experiences oftheir life situation in forensic psychiatric wards. Using a ReflectiveLifeworld Research approach founded in phenomenology, we analysed eleven qualitative interviews with patients cared for in a maximum security unit in a Swedish forensic psychiatric service. Results show how forensic psychiatric care canbe non-caring with only moments of good care, from the patient’s perspective.By use of different strategies, the patients struggle to adapt to the demandsof the caregivers in order to gain privileges. At the same time the patientsare lacking meaningful and close relationships and long to get away from thesystem of forensic care. Being cared for entails struggling against anapproaching overwhelming sense of resignation.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The Physical Environment of Purpose-Built and Non-Purpose Built Supported Housing for Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities in Sweden.2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 223-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate if methods derived from environmental psychology can be used to study the qualities of the physical environment of supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities. Three units of analysis were selected: the private area, the common indoor area, and the outdoor area. Expert assessments of 110 features of the physical environment in these units and semantic environmental description of the visual experience of them consistently showed that purpose-built supported housing facilities  had more physical features important for high quality residential environments than the non-purpose-built supp orted housing facilities. The employed methods were thus seen to be able to describe and discriminate between qualities in the physical environment of supported housing facilities. Suggestions for the development of tools for the assessment of the physical environment in supported housing are made.

  • 13.
    Jormfeldt, H
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bengtsson, A
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Svedberg, P
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Staff's Experiences of a Person-Centered Health Education Group Intervention for People with a Persistent Mental Illness2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 488-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient education in mental health care is a conventional intervention to increase patients' knowledge about their illness and treatment. A provider-centered focus in patient education may put patients in a passive role, which can counteract their processes of recovery. There is an increasing emphasis on recovery-oriented practice, an approach that is aligned with the service user perspective, but little is known about healthcare staffs’ perspective on person-centered mental health care. A qualitative approach was used to describe staffs’ experiences of being group leaders in a person-centered health education intervention in municipal services for persons with a persistent mental illness. The analysis of staff experiences revealed three core categories: implications of division of responsibility between local authorities, awareness of facilitating factors of growth and the meaning of dialogue, forming the theme “Preconditions for person-centered care”. Further research is required to explore larger economic, political and social structures as a backdrop to person-centered mental health care, from the perspective of service users, families, health professionals and society at large.

  • 14. Jormfeldt, H
    et al.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Agneta
    Svedberg, Petra
    Experiences of a person-centred health education group intervention: A qualitative study among people with a persistent mental illness2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 209-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main focus of psychoeducative interventions for people with persistent mental illnesses have been on the reduction of noncompliance by providing information about symptoms of disease and its treatment. Social support and supporting group contexts have been described as essential for transforming personal strategies into action and the achievement of personal goals. A qualitative descriptive approach was used in order to explore experiences of a person-centered health education group intervention among persons with a persistent mental illness. The sample consisted of 13 persons with a persistent mental illness who had participated in the group intervention between the autumn 2008 and the autumn 2009. Participants expressed experiences of health processes in terms of stimulating content, development towards personal growth and group context with equality, when participating in the intervention. The findings of the actual study support further investigation on the topic of health promotion approaches emphasizing individual preferences throughout the process of psychoeducation. Further research regarding individual preferences and participation in decision-making processes related to issues of compliance among persons with a persistent mental illness are suggested.

  • 15.
    Marcheschi, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Lunds Universitet.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hansson, Lars
    Lunds Universitet.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lunds Universitet.
    The influence of physical environmental qualities on the social climate of supported housing facilities for people with severe mental illness2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates the extent to which the perceived physical environmental quality of housing facilities for people with severe mental illness accounts for perceived social environmental quality. Twenty facilities were assessed by people with psychiatric disabilities (residents), staff, and experts with regard to the physical environmental aspects of visual pleasantness, indirect environmental effects, overall physical quality, and the social environmental indicator of social relationship. The results suggest that residents’ and staff's physical environmental quality perception accounts for social relationship quality perception, whereas experts’ environmental assessment does not. Moreover, the staff reported a more positive social relationship perception than the residents.

  • 16.
    Rask, Mikael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University ; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Residents' View of Quality in Ordinary Housing with Housing Support for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 132-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the quality of housing support provided in housing services for people with psychiatric disabilities living in ordinary housing with housing support from the residents' perspective, by using the QPC-H instrument. A sample of 174 residents in ordinary housing, receiving housing support from 22 housing support services in nine Swedish municipalities, participated in this study. The results show that the quality of psychiatric care in housing services was mainly rated highly as measured with the QPC-H instrument. The dimensions Encounter and Secluded Environment were the aspects that were rated as the two with the highest quality of housing service. The dimensions Participation and Secure Environment were rated as those with the lowest quality. There were more residents who totally disagreed with the statements in the dimensions Participation and Housing Specific than in the other dimensions. The perceived lower quality in Encounter, Participation, Support and the Housing Specific dimensions was associated with a low frequency of psychiatric outpatient clinic contacts. A conclusion is that the support staff could be more observant regarding the residents' need for support and also talk more with them about what could be done to assist them. It also seems important that the support staff discuss with the residents regarding how they can help them to feel more secure in their accommodation.

  • 17.
    Rusner, Marie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    The paradox of being both needed and rejected: the existential meaning of being closely related to a person with bipolar disorder2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 200-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the existential meaning of being closely related to a person with bipolar disorder. A qualitative, descriptive and explorative design with a phenomenological meaning-oriented analysis was used. The findings reveal a paradoxical, existential exposure of close relatives to a person with bipolar disorder, being both needed and rejected whilst being overshadowed by the specific changeable nature of bipolar disorder. Psychiatric health care services are recommended to consider changes in attitudes and structures that may facilitate for close relatives` participation in the care and treatment of persons with bipolar disorder.

  • 18.
    Syrén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Cty Hosp, Jönköping, Sweden.
    A Striving Towards 'Normality': Illness-related Beliefs among Individuals Living with a Psychotic Disorder2014In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 842-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beliefs related to illness constrain or facilitate health and wellbeing, and are of importance in how people understand and manage their illness. The aim of this study was to identify illness beliefs among individuals living with illness from a psychotic disorder. Data collected through two qualitative interview studies was secondary analysed by means of a method for directed content analysis. Beliefs of being different and odd, and of what constitutes 'normality', are prominent and constrain, in several respects, wellbeing among the individuals with psychotic illness. Beliefs about possible wellbeing are preferably related to existential, human desires of caretaking and responsibility for self and others. An awareness among mental healthcare staff that one does not hold the unequivocal truth about what is normal and healthy, is of importance. They need to ask questions about illness beliefs and not ignore or judge the answers received, but instead discuss them. Relationship-centred care, where a mutual dialogue occurs between the individual, the family and mental healthcare staff, is highlighted.

  • 19.
    Tuvesson, Hanna
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund university.
    Nursing Staff Stress and Individual Characteristics in Relation to the Ward Atmosphere in Psychiatric In-Patient Wards2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 726-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    - This study investigated the interplay between nursing staff stress, Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, individual characteristics and the ward atmosphere in psychiatric in-patient care. Data were collected through five questionnaires from 93 nursing staff. Multivariate analysis showed that Moral Strength, Moral Burden, Internal Demands, Perceived Stress and age were related to several factors of the ward atmosphere. We conclude that efforts to reduce stress levels and create a supporting ethical climate on psychiatric wards would be beneficial for both psychiatric nursing staff and their nursing practice. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 20.
    Tuvesson, Hanna
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö University.
    Perceived stress among nursing staff in psychiatric inpatient care: the influence of perceptions of the ward atmosphere and the psychosocial work environment2011In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 441-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate (1) perceived stress as felt by the nursing staff working in psychiatric inpatient care, (2) possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants, and (3) associations among individual characteristics, the ward atmosphere, the psychosocial work environment, and perceived stress. Ninety-three members of the nursing staff completed three instruments--one each measuring perceived stress, the ward atmosphere, and the psychosocial work environment. There were no differences among the staff groups concerning perceived stress. Multivariate analysis showed that the ward atmosphere factor "Involvement" and the psychosocial work environment factor "Role Clarity" were indicators of perceived stress. Improvements in these factors could help to prevent stress among the staff.

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