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  • 1.
    Annborn, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Finnbogadottir, Hafrún
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Obstetric violence a qualitative interview study2022In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 105, article id 103212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the meaning of the concept of ‘obstetric violence’ to women in Sweden, whoreported a negative birth experience.

    Design: An inductive qualitative approach with individual narratives. A thematic qualitative content anal-ysis was used.

    Setting: Three midwifery clinics in southwest Scania.

    Participants: Twelve women who had given birth less than three years previously and reported a nega-tive/traumatic birth experience.

    Findings: The key findings showed that the women had experienced psychological and physical abuse during childbirth which may be interpreted as ‘obstetric violence’. Four categories emerged from the analyses describing the women’s experiences: Lack of information and consent including poor informationand no right to participate in decisions concerning the process of labour, Insufficient pain relief, which encompassed unbearable pain without pain relief, Lack of trust and security where the women experi-enced staff with bad attitudes and jargon, and The experience of abuse including threats of violence from midwives and where the birth experience was compared to rape.

    Key conclusions: The study shows that physical and psychological abuse during childbirth exists in Sweden and that women experience this as being subjected to ‘obstetric violence’ during childbirth. The phenomenon of obstetric violence is very complex. The abuse of women during childbirth might be asignificant problem and quality assurance is required to secure the rights of women giving birth.

    Implications for practice: In order to secure the rights of birthing women and to promote respectful andsupportive care for new mothers, quality development programs are required

  • 2.
    Bitar, Dima
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Arabic-speaking women's experiences of communication at antenatal care in Sweden using a tablet application: part of development and feasibility study2020In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 84, no May, p. 1-8, article id 102660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore Arabic-speaking women´s experiences of communication at antenatal care in Sweden when using a tablet application (app).

    Design: The study is a part of a major research project, where a Swedish-Arabic app was developed to improve and facilitate communication between Arabic-speaking women and midwives. The first prototype was developed in 2017 and tested at six antenatal clinics in southeast of Sweden. Ten Arabic-speaking women were purposively recruited, and individual interviews were performed. Content analysis was used.

    Findings: Four main categories emerged: "Adapting the content to the patient group", "language and communication", "user-friendly" and "improvement proposal". The women reported that the content was educational, reliable and understandable. The information gave the women a sense of security. It was time effective and allowed opportunity for dialogue. Depending on language skills, there were different opinions as to whether the App should be a complement to having an interpreter or used separately.

    Key conclusion: Arabic-speaking women perceived the App as being a communication tool despite their language skills in Swedish. There is a need for digital support for communication in maternity care

  • 3.
    Bjelke, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Lendahls, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Management of the passive phase of the second stage of labour in nulliparous women—Focus group discussions with Swedish midwives2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 75, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bjelke, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Anna-Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Lendahls, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Using the internet as a source of information during pregnancy: a descriptive cross-sectional study in Sweden2016In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 40, p. 187-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The Internet plays a major role for pregnant women in seeking knowledge and for getting in touch with like-minded women. The information is available at all hours and can be accessed anywhere. The information provides the women with a sense of control and confidence but the large amount of information available can also be overwhelming. The aim of this study was to identify how women use the Internet as a source of information during their pregnancy and how it affects them.

    Design and setting

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted.Data were collected through a questionnaire at antenatal clinics in the southern Sweden. The data were analyzed descriptively

    Participants

    A total of 193 Swedish women, pregnant at least 34 weeks, participated in the study. The response rate was 94%.

    Findings

    Almost all (95%) of the women in the study used the Internet as a source of information. The main reason was to find information and read about people in the same situation. Reading pregnancy-related information on the Internet was seen as positive. However, a majority of the woman experienced feelings of worry due to something they read online. These feelings were most commonly coped with by talking to a partner, relatives, and friends or by asking the midwife at their next appointment. Eleven per cent of the women contacted the general healthcare services because of their feelings of worry.

    Conclusion

    Almost all women in this study searched the Internet to find pregnancy-related information, despite being satisfied with the information they received from the ANC. Using the Internet was seen as complementary to the information from professionals. It also caused feelings of worry, which could lead to the woman contacting healthcare services for support. ANC could help to reduce these feelings for some women by informing about the advantages and disadvantages with online information and recommending suitable web pages.

  • 5.
    Finnbogadottir, Hafrún
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Crang Svalenius, Elizabeth
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Persson, Eva K
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Expectant first-time fathers’ experiences of pregnancy2003In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 96-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to describe first-time-expectant fathers’ experiences of pregnancy.

    Design: an inductive method using narrative interview formand qualitative content textanalysis.The text of the transcriptswas coded and categorised.

    Settings and participants: seven first-time-expectant fathers living in a multicultural industrial town in southern Sweden were interviewed individually when their partner was in the 38th to 39thweek of pregnancy.

    Measurements and findings: all the fathers-to-be experienced some psychological, socialand/or physical change during the pregnancy. The main category, was ‘time of transition’. Eight categories were found under this. They were: ‘feelings of unreality, ‘insufficiency and inadequacy’, ‘exclusion’, ‘reality’, ‘social changes’, ‘physical changes’, ‘responsibility, and development’.

    Key conclusion: the fathers’-to-be special needs for support and encouragement durin gpregnancymay be as important as those of the mothers’-to-be. The caregiver needs to be as aware of and sensitive to these needs. However, before any interventions can be recommendedmore research is needed.

  • 6.
    Finnbogadottir, Hafrún
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Dykes, Anna-Karin
    Malmö University, Sweden;Lund University, Sweden.
    Midwives' awareness and experiences regarding domestic violence among pregnant women in southern Sweden2012In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    to explore midwives' awareness of and clinical experience regarding domestic violence among pregnant women in southern Sweden.

    Design

    an inductive qualitative design, using focus groups interviews.

    Setting

    midwives with experience of working in antenatal care (ANC) units connected to two university hospitals in southern Sweden. Participants 16 midwives recruited by network sampling and purposive sampling, divided into four focus groups of three to five individuals.

    Findings

    five categories emerged: ‘Knowledge about ‘the different faces’ of violence’, perpetrator and survivor behaviour, and violence-related consequences. ‘Identified and visible vulnerable groups’, ‘at risk’ groups for exposure to domestic violence during pregnancy, e.g. immigrants and substance users. ‘Barriers towards asking the right questions’, the midwife herself could be an obstacle, lack of knowledge among midwives as to how to handle disclosure of violence, fear of the perpetrator and presence of the partner at visits to the midwife. ‘Handling the delicate situation’, e.g. the potential conflict between the midwife's professional obligation to protect the pregnant woman and the unborn baby who is exposed to domestic violence and the survivor's wish to avoid interference. ‘The crucial role of the midwife’, insufficient or non-existent support for the midwife, lack of guidelines and/or written plans of action in situations when domestic violence is disclosed. The above five categories were subsumed under the overarching category ‘Failing both mother and the unborn baby’ which highlights the vulnerability of the unborn baby and the need to provide protection for the unborn baby by means of adequate care to the pregnant woman.

    Key conclusions and implication for practice

    avoidance of questions concerning the experience of violence during pregnancy may be regarded as a failing not only to the pregnant woman but also to the unprotected and unborn baby. Nevertheless, certain hindrances must be overcome before the implementation of routine enquiry concerning violence during pregnancy. It is important to develop guidelines and a plan of action for all health-care personnel at antenatal clinics as well as to provide continuous education and professional support for midwives in southern Sweden.

  • 7.
    Higginbottom, Gina M. A.
    et al.
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Safipour, Jalal
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Alberta, Canada.
    Yohani, Sophie
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    O’Brien, Beverley
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Mumtaz, Zubia
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Paton, Patricia
    Alberta Health Services, Canada.
    An ethnographic study of communication challenges in maternity care for immigrant women in rural Alberta2015In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 297-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    many immigrant and ethno-cultural groups in Canada face substantial barriers to accessing health care including language barriers. The negative consequences of miscommunication in health care settings are well documented although there has been little research on communication barriers facing immigrant women seeking maternity care in Canada. This study identified the nature of communication difficulties in maternity services from the perspectives of immigrant women, health care providers and social service providers in a small city in southern Alberta, Canada.

    Methods

    a focused ethnography was undertaken incorporating interviews with 31 participants recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. A community liaison and several gatekeepers within the community assisted with recruitment and interpretation where needed (n=1). All interviews were recorded and audio files were transcribed verbatim by a professional transcriptionist. The data was analysed drawing upon principles expounded by Roper and Shapira (2000) for the analysis of ethnographic data, because of (1) the relevance to ethnographic data, (2) the clarity and transparency of the approach, (3) the systematic approach to analysis, and (4) the compatibility of the approach with computer-assisted qualitative analysis software programs such as Atlas.ti (ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH, Germany). This process included (1) coding for descriptive labels, (2) sorting for patterns, (3) identification of outliers, (4) generation of themes, (5) generalising to generate constructs and theories, and (6) memoing including researcher reflections.

    Findings

    four main themes were identified including verbal communication, unshared meaning, non-verbal communication to build relationships, and trauma, culture and open communication. Communication difficulties extended beyond matters of language competency to those encompassing non-verbal communication and its relation to shared meaning as well as the interplay of underlying pre-migration history and cultural factors which affect open communication, accessible health care and perhaps also maternal outcomes.

    Conclusion

    this study provided insights regarding maternity health care communication. Communication challenges may be experienced by all parties, yet the onus remains for health care providers and for those within health care management and professional bodies to ensure that providers are equipped with the skills necessary to facilitate culturally appropriate care.

  • 8.
    Higginbottom, Gina M.A
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Yohani, Sophie
    Paton, Patricia
    Immigrant women's experience of maternity services in Canada: A meta-ethnography2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 544-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    to synthesise data on immigrant women's experiences of maternity services in Canada.

    Design

    a qualitative systematic literature review using a meta-ethnographic approach

    Methods

    a comprehensive search strategy of multiple databases was employed in consultation with an information librarian, to identify qualitative research studies published in English or French between 1990 and December 2011 on maternity care experiences of immigrant women in Canada. A modified version of Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic theoretical approach was undertaken to develop an inductive and interpretive form of knowledge synthesis. The seven-phase process involved comparative textual analysis of published qualitative studies, including the translation of key concepts and meanings from one study to another to derive second and third-order concepts encompassing more than that offered by any individual study. ATLAS.ti qualitative data analysis software was used to store and manage the studies and synthesise their findings.

    Findings

    the literature search identified 393 papers, of which 22 met the inclusion criteria and were synthesised. The literature contained seven key concepts related to maternity service experiences including social (professional and informal) support, communication, socio-economic barriers, organisational environment, knowledge about maternity services and health care, cultural beliefs and practices, and different expectations between health care staff and immigrant women. Three second-order interpretations served as the foundation for two third-order interpretations. Societal positioning of immigrant women resulted in difficulties receiving high quality maternity health care. Maternity services were an experience in which cultural knowledge and beliefs, and religious and traditional preferences were highly relevant as well but often overlooked in Canadian maternity settings.

    Key conclusions and implications for practice

    in order to implement woman-centered care, to enhance access to maternity services, and to promote immigrant women's health, it is important to consider these women's social position, cultural knowledge and beliefs, and traditional customs in the health care.

  • 9.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Bard, Karin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Berntorp, Kerstin
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Beliefs about health and illness postpartum in women born in Sweden and the Middle East.2009In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 564-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore beliefs about health and illness three months postpartum in women born in Sweden and the Middle East, and to study whether they perceive gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as a prediabetic condition. Methods: an explorative study using semi-structured interviews 3 months postpartum. Interviews were held three months after birth. Consecutive sample of women with GDM; 13 born in Sweden and 14 born in the Middle East. The results showed that irrespective of origin, health was focused on well-being and being able to care for the baby. Many Middle Eastern women did not know how long GDM would last or said that they had been informed by staff about its transience. They worried about still having diabetes mellitus, and the disease directed them to self-monitoring of blood glucose and the desire for health-care staff to verify the disease. They showed tendencies to dietary changes. Swedish-born women feared development of type 2 DM and had undertaken active health-related behaviour. In conlusion, beliefs about health and illness differ, change and affect awareness of risk and self-care practice postpartum. Swedish women showed high risk awareness with changes in life style and the desire for more information to avoid developing DM. Middle Eastern women showed increased risk awareness and sought help from staff in checking whether GDM was present in the postpartum period. For clinical practice it is important to recognise that Middle Eastern women, in contrast to Swedish-born women, have not incorporated the message that GDM is a risk marker for future development of DM. Health professionals have a significant role in supporting women and their families undergoing the transition to motherhood, particularly migrants in a new country. Identifying individual beliefs is of utmost importance. Pre-existing baby health clinics can be developed to address mothers' needs as well as the health of the baby.

  • 10.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Berntorp, Kerstin
    Frid, Anders
    Åberg, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Beliefs about health and illness in women managed for gestational diabetes in two organisations.2008In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 168-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore beliefs about health, illness and health care in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) managed in two different organisations based on diabetology or obstetrics.

    Semi-structured interviews were made in two different clinics. clinic A: a specialist diabetes clinic with regular contact with a diabetologist and antenatal care provided by a midwife

    clinic B: a specialist maternity clinic providing regular contact with a midwife, a structured programme for self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin treatment, and a 1-day diabetes class by an obstetrician, a diabetologist, a midwife and a dietician. The clinics were located at two different university hospitals in Sweden.

    Participants were a consecutive sample of Swedish women diagnosed with GDM; 13 managed in clinic A and 10 managed in clinic B.

    The findings showed that women described their perceptions of as well-being, being healthy and freedom from disease. All respondents reported a delay in the provision of information about GMD and an information gap about GDM and the management of the condition, from diagnosis until the start of treatment at the specialist clinic. Respondents from clinic A expressed fear about future development of type 2 diabetes. Women from clinic B discussed different causes of GDM, and many claimed that health-care staff informed them that GDM was a transient condition during pregnancy. Respondents from clinic A reported a conflict in their treatment of pregnancy and GDM as two different conditions.

    Beliefs differed and were related to the health-care model chosen.

  • 11.
    Ingvarsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Swedish midwives' experiences and views of amniotomy: an interview study2020In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 91, no December, article id 102840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore midwives’ experiences and views of amniotomy.

    Design: A qualitative inductive design was used. Data were collected using interviews and analysed with content analysis carried out with NVivo 12.

    Setting and participants: Sixteen midwives working at delivery wards at three hospitals in the south of Sweden.

    Findings: Three categories emerged: “Promote, protect and support the physiological process of labour”, “To make the decision -to do or not to do” and “Unpredictable response”. The overall theme linking the three categories was “We become our decisions”, portraying how midwives carry the responsibility in the decision-making and represent themselves in their handling of amniotomy.

    Conclusions: Amniotomy was experienced and viewed as both simple and complex, safe and risky, and deciding on it sometimes implied balancing contradicting perspectives. By using midwifery skills in the decision-making for an amniotomy, the midwives tried to predict the response, purposing to support physiological labour and promote health for women and babies.

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  • 12.
    Johansson, Christel
    et al.
    Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Finnbogadottir, Hafrún
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    First-time mothers’ satisfaction with their birth experience – a cross-sectional study2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 79, no December, article id 102540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore first-time mothers' satisfaction with their birth experience using Visual Analog Scale and to identify possible risk factors for a negative birth experience.

    Design: A cross-sectional design using retrospective data collection from electronic medical files.

    Setting: A birthing center in southern Sweden, which has approximately 1400 births annually.

    Participants: Primiparous women (N = 584) who gave birth during 2017. The cut-off point for a negative birth experience was set as <= 4 on the Visual Analog Scale.

    Measurements and findings: The mean age of the women was 29 years (SD 5.1; range 16-47 years). Prevalence of a negative birth experience was 9.6%. The strongest risk factors for a negative birth experience were having obstetric anal sphincter injuries (AOR 2.8 CI 95% 1.1-7.2) and oxytocin augmentation started in the first stage of labor (AOR 2.2 CI 95% 1.1-4.4).

    Key conclusions: Women who had their labours augmented with oxytocin or sustained an anal sphincter injury were statistically significantly more likely to have a negative birth experience. However, it is uncertain whether the women scored pain experience or birth experience when they reported their satisfaction on the Visual Analog Scale; further investigation is required.

    Implications for practice: It is important to use a reliable and validated instrument to measure birth experience in order to promote respectful and supportive care for new mothers.

  • 13.
    Jonsdottir, Sigridur Sia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Univ Akureyri, Iceland.
    Steingrimsdottir, Thora
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Thome, Marga
    Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Oskarsson, Guomundur Kristjan
    Univ Akureyri, Iceland.
    Lydsdottir, Linda Bara
    Univ Iceland, Iceland;VIRK Vocat Rehabil Fund, Iceland.
    Olafsdottir, Halldora
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik
    Univ Iceland, Iceland;Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland;Reykjav Univ, Iceland.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pain management and medical interventions during childbirth among perinatal distressed women and women dissatisfied in their partner relationship: A prospective cohort study2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 69, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate possible associations between distress in pregnant women and their use of pain management and medical interventions. Furthermore, we assessed the effects of reported dissatisfaction in relationship with their partner, or weak social support. Design: This was a prospective cohort study. Setting: Women were invited to participate while attending prenatal care at participating Icelandic health care centres. Birth outcome data were obtained from the hospitals where these women gave birth. Participants: Women in this study participated in a research project where 2523 women were screened three times during pregnancy for anxiety and depression. Women who had positive results at screening were invited to a semi-structured interview during pregnancy as well as every fourth woman who had negative results. Five hundred and sixty-two women participated in the interviews and the final sample was 442 women. Measurements: Distress was defined as symptoms of anxiety, stress and depression. The Edinburgh Post-partum Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS) were used for screening purposes. During the interview, the women answered the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and the Adverse Experienced Interview (AEI). The main outcome variables that were obtained from the women's childbirth records were: (1) use of pain management, categorized as: epidural analgesia, non-pharmacological pain management, nitrous oxide, pharmacological medication, or no pain management; (2) medical interventions categorized as: induction, stimulation, and episiotomy; and (3) mode of childbirth. A logistic regression analysis, adjusted for significant covariates, was conducted. Findings: A significant association was found between perinatal distress at 16 weeks gestation and use of epidural as single pain management. Overall, distressed women were 2.6 times more likely than non-distressed women to use epidural as a single pain management. They were also less likely to go through childbirth without use of any pain management method. Women who were dissatisfied in their relationship were significantly more likely to undergo induction of childbirth, an episiotomy and/or a vacuum extraction than those who were satisfied in their relationship, regardless if they were distressed or not. No association was found between social support and the outcome variables. Key conclusions: Women with perinatal distress were more likely to use an epidural than non-distressed women. The use of an epidural might help them manage pain and uncertainties related to childbirth. Women who were dissatisfied in their partner relationship may be more likely to undergo induction of childbirth, episiotomy and/or vacuum extraction. Implication for practice: Midwives need to acknowledge the possible association of distress and use of an epidural during childbirth and screen for distress early in pregnancy. It is important to offer counselling and help during pregnancy for expectant parents who are distressed or dissatisfied in their relationship. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Nilsson, Christina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    University College of Borås.
    Women's lived experience of fear of childbirth2009In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 25, no 2, p. e1-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to describe women’s lived experience of fear of childbirth.

    Design: a qualitative study using a phenomenological approach and a lifeworld perspective. Data were collected via tape-recorded interviews.

    Setting: Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Go¨teborg, Sweden in 2003.

    Participants: eight pregnant women (24–37 gestational weeks) seeking help within an outpatient clinic for women with severe fear of childbirth. Two of the women were primiparous.

    Findings: four constituents were identified: feeling of danger that threatens and appeals; feeling trapped; feeling like an inferior mother-to-be and on your own. The essential structure was described as ‘to lose oneself as a woman into loneliness’.

    Key conclusions: fear of childbirth affects women in such a way that they start to doubt themselves and feel uncertain of their ability to bear and give birth to a child. Previous birth experience was central to the multiparous women. They described their experiences of suffering in relation to the care they received during childbirth. This mainly concerned pain and negative experiences with staff.

    Implications for practice: pregnant women who fear childbirth are an exposed group in need of much support during pregnancy and childbirth. The encounter between the woman and the midwife can be a way of breaking down the feeling of loneliness and restoring the woman’s trust in herself as a childbearing woman.

  • 15.
    Oscarsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Medin, Erica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Holmström, Ida
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lendahls, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Using the Internet as source of information during pregnancy: a descriptive cross-sectional study among fathers-to-be in Sweden2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 62, p. 146-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to identify how fathers-to-be used the Internet as a source of information during their partners' pregnancy and how it affected them.

    Design and setting

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were collected through a questionnaire and distributed at a maternity clinic in south of Sweden. The data were analysed descriptively.

    Participants

    Ninety-two Swedish fathers participated in the study, and the response rate was 98.9%.

    Findings

    Of all the fathers-to-be, 76% sought pregnancy-related information on the Internet. One sought information on a daily basis, 40.6% every week and 58% every month or more rarely. The fathers-to-be who participated at all/most visits at antenatal care searched for information on the Internet more often than those who only attended few/no visits (p = 0.012). A total of 33.4% of fathers-to-be had been recommended a web page by the midwife at the antenatal care. The main reason for using the Internet was to find information about pregnancy related subjects and read about people in similar situations. More than half of the fathers-to-be (61.8%) had at some point been worried by something they read online. These concerns were commonly addressed by asking the midwife at their next appointment (33.9%). Almost 26% of the fathers-to-be chose not to take any action at all to address their concerns.

    Conclusion

    The majority of all fathers-to-be searched for information on the Internet, and more than half of the fathers were, at some point, worried about the information they read on the Internet. One way to address questions and concerns could be for the fathers-to-be to ask and discuss with the midwives what they read online so that midwives can recommend appropriate and credible websites. To achieve this, there must be opportunities for midwives to gain knowledge on how best to use the Internet as a tool.

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